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October 02, 1981 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Kuwait
says Iran
bombed its
S S
oil fields
KUWAIT (UPI) - Kuwait charged
yesterday that Iranian warplanes
violated its airspace for the fourth time
since the start of the Iran-Iraq war, at-
tacking and setting fire to oil in-
stallations. Officials in Tehran denied
the charge.
The Kuwaiti Foreign Ministry sum-
moned Iranian Ambassador to Kuwait
Ali Shams Ardakani and handed him a
formal note of protest which was
described by Kuwait's KUNA news
agency as "strongly-worded."
A SPOKESMAN said the Kuwaiti
cabinet met in emergency session to
discuss the attack, -which KUNA said
was the fourth incident since the start
of the Iran-Iraq war on Sept. 22, 1980.
Kuwait's government spokesman and
acting foreign minister, Abdel Aziz
Hussein, said three Iranian warplanes
attacked the oil complex in Um Aleish,
across the border from the Iraqi oil in-
stallations that have been frequent
targets in the war.
Hussein said there were no casualties
in yesterday's attack but it touched off
a massive fire which damaged part of
the installation. The blaze was brought
under control by firemen later in the
day, he said.
An Iranian foreign ministry
spokesman, contacted by telephone
from Beirut, called the Kuwaiti report WALKER BEDDOES, AN employee of the General Services Administration
"baseless ... Our planes were not even holds an ebony carving of an Indonesian woman, originally presented to
in the area today and there has been no former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, at an auction yesterday in
aerial activity in that area. s Washington. The gifts were presented to U.S. officials by foreign gover-
nments, and any gifts worth more than $50, such as this, must be returned to
the government.
Groups sugest rape deterrents

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October'2, 1981-F
State prison reform
needed, expert says

7

LANSING (UPI) - Nationally known
crime expert Milton Rector said
yesterday the state must follow through
on recommendations made by a blue-
ribbon panel following the May riots if
it wants to avoid future outbursts.
Rector, president of the National
Council on Crime and Delinquency, also
praised the early releases allowed un-
der the state's Prison Overcrowding
Act and said other states are looking at
the measure as a model for similar
programs.
RECTOR TOLD the House Correc-
tions Committee too many states have
disregarded reports such as those made
following the riots at Southern
Michigan Prison at Jackson, Ionia
Reformatory and Marquette Branch
Prison.
"The big trouble with every citizens
committee is that they were disbanded.
They need to stay on to monitor and see
that program recommendations are at-
tained," Rector said.
"You need to not let this get started
and then cut it off. If anything makes
them (prisoners) cynical, it's to see
those reports go on file."
HE SUGGESTED the state build up
its prison ombudsman program to
closely monitor gripes from inmates.
Rector noted there is seldom a riot

where the prison chaplain has not been
informed of problems "a long time
before."
The council president also said the
state must rescind a ballot proposal
passed three years ago that eliminated
time off for good behavior.
"You must tell them (voters) that
unless they rescind it, they'll be spen-
ding more money (on corrections
programs), not less," Rector said.
The crime expert - a former adviser
to then-Gov. Ronald Reagan - said the
president may be damaging himself by
promising more money for federal
prisons in hopes they will help stem the
rising crime rate.
"If anything will erode his
credibility, it's trying to live up to his
promises," Rector said.

ANN ARBĀ«
F INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
Sth Arc at Lob 761.1700
50 WED. SAT. SUN.
.$150 'TIL 6:00 PM
$ 300 EVERY DAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT TUES $1.00 day)
WHY WON'T ANY OTHER
THEATRE IN ANN ARBOR
SHOW THIS MOVIE?
BECAUSE..,
IT'S ABOUT A MAN AND A WOM-
AN IN THEIR SEVENTIES.
BECAUSE...
IT DEALS WITH THE THINGS YOU
CARE ABOUT, LIKE GROWING OLD,
FEARING DEATH INSTEAD OF PRO-
VIDING AN ESCAPE FROM REALITY!

MELVIN DOUGLAS
LIVA KEDROVA

I

DAILY-7:10, 9:00
SAT. SUN-1:30, 3:20, 5:20,
7:10,9:10

4

(Continued from Page 1)

and locking doors and windows at
home.
One source of information on rape
prevention is the newly formed
Citizen's Advisory Committee on Rape
Prevention, chaired by City Coun-
cilmember Lowell Peterson. The 13-
member committee met for the first
time on September 1, and "put together
an inventory of rape prevention ac-
tivities," Peterson said.
One main project will be coordinating
activities of different sexual assault
centers in the Ann Arbor area, Peterson
said.
THEY ARE also pushing for federal
support of an all-night Dial-a-ride type
program. This program would provide
a taxi from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. and would
cost $1 total for all riders.
This program, however, won't be in
operation before the winter Peterson
said.
The committe will also be putting
together a spot map highlighting areas
of past or future potential danger.
LAST MAY, the council set aside
$3,600 for rape prevention education
programs. Peterson said most of 'the
money has already been put to use on
films and pamphlets.
0 The Assault Crisis Center is another
source of education on rape prevention.
They have speakers and a great deal of
literature on ways to prevent a rape
before it happens, Lynch-Miller said.
But the crisis center also provides
important direct counseling with rape
victims immediately after the incident.
They are usually called in by the
hospital emergency nurse or by the
. police after a rape has been reported to
help the victim recover from the
trauma, she said.
"EMPHASIS IS put on the comfort
and needs of the victim," she said.
"That's number one."

Assault Crisis workers also help the
victims understand the police
proceedings, including the medical
examination and the police report.
They stress that it is the victim's
decision alone whether or not she wants
to prosecute.
Lynch-Miller said many victims are
reluctant to go to court because they
fear the stereotypical harassment'that
television portrays. That isn't true
here, she said; the officers are not in-
sensitive to the victim.
AFTER MEDICAL examination and
the police proceedings, the crisis center
helps the victim in the important stage
of getting over the experience by
making an appointment with the victim
to come in and talk about it.
Making a police report of a rape is a
straightforward procedure, basically
the same as making any other criminal
report.
After the police are notified of the
rape, they urge the victim to go to the
hospital for an examination, said Sgt.
William Canada of the Ann Arbor
Police Department. This exam can be
used as evidence if the victim should
decide to prosecute.
AS SOON AS she is able, the victim is
interviewed by a detective who asks
questions about the circumstances
surrounding the rape.
Canada said the answers from the in-
terviews can help determine if the
assailant has been involved in other
cases that have been reported.
It is often hard to identify the
assailant, however, Canada said,
because it is generally dark and the
woman is "scared to death."
IF THE VICTIM doesn't know her
assailant, Canada said, the police at-
tempt to draw a composite picture of
the suspect from her description. She is
also shown photographs of suspects
from other sexual cases to see if she

recognizes any of them.
The officers that were on duty that
night are asked if they noticed any
suspicious persons.loitering in the area
of the rape or if they recognize the
suspect from the description.
The police also go to the scene of the
crime, taking anything they find to the
Michigan State crime lab, said detec-
tive Mary Smith.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557
S r

2nd & FINAL WEEK
"A KNOCKOUT!
A VERY BIG,
BEAUTIFUL FILM.
THE BEST PER-
FORMANCE BY
AN ACTRESS
THIS YEAR."
-Vincent Canby,
New York Times

GLENDA
JACKSON
AS

(PG}

DAILY-7:20, 9:20
SAT. SUN-1;10, 3:10, 5:20,
7:20, 9:20

7-

Mlich igan

Ensemble Theatre
cMirandoffna
by Carlo Goldoni
Sept. 24-27
Oct. 1-4
8:00 p.m.
Sunday Mat.
2:00 p. m.

ANN ARBOR
9 ., CHEAP FLICKS
FRI & SAT NIGHT
ALL SEATS 994
AT 12:00 AM
MUSIC BY
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One of the
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ALTEREDO
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Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
Tickets at PTP-Mich. League
764-0450
FINAL WEEK

THE

OCT. 6

Hill Auditorium
Tickets are
on sale now.

GORDON LIGHIFOOT
OCT. 10- Hill Auditorium
Tickets are $11.00 and $10.00
and are on sale now.

Ar

Al IActeII

I

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