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October 02, 1981 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-02

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 2, 1981-Page 5

1000-0

Bomb blast kills 60;
rips apart PLO center

1\

AP P ofO
MICHAEL BATES OF DREWSVILLE, N.H., holds up his hands for
newsmen to see yesterday at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital.
Bates has seven fingers reattached successfully after a two-day operation at
the hospital. He had lost eight, one of which could not be saved.
7 fingers reattached

i.n surgical
BOSTON (AP) - Seven fingers
severed from the hands of a 21-year-
old man by an iron press were suc-
cessfully reattached in a two-day
} "surgical marathon" that involved
44 doctors, nurses and technicians,
doctors announced yesterday.
Dr. James May Jr., who headed
the Massachusetts General Hospital
surgical team, said he believed the
operation marked the first time
surgeons have been able to replace
that many fingers. He also said the
461/2 hours was the longest a patient
had been under general anesthesia
at Massachusetts General.
"THE REASON FOR reporting
this case is that surgeons in general
and the public in general must be
made aware that this type of
procedure is possible," May tolda
news conference that was attended
by the patient, Michael Bates of
Drewsville, N.H.
Bates lost eight fingers Sept. 4
when they were caught in the iron
press at a factory in Bellows Falls,
Vt.
"I knew I didn't have any hands,"
Bates recalled. "I didn't think I'd
have hands again until a fewdays
ago when they had me- move my
fingers."
MAY SAID THE surgical proced-
cures for reattaching severed limbs
have become commonplace over the
past few years. He- estimated
surgeons at his hospital perform an
average of one replant operation a
week.
"This type of replant surgery is
going on in'every major city as we
speak," he said. "We were able to
conduct this type of surgical
marathon because we have the per-
sonnel to carry it out."

marathon
Bates was first treated at
Rockingham Memorial Hospital in
Bellows Falls by Dr. Richard San-
ctuary, who conferred with May by
telephone and decided to send the
patient the 120 miles to Boston.
DOCTORS WERE ABLE to
replant all eight fingers, but May
said the little finger on the right
hand had to be partially amputated
later after it began to lose cir-
culation.
Bates arrived in Boston by am-
bulance 2% hours after his accident.
The fingers, which were kept in a
saline solution cooled by ice water,
were taken to Boston in the same
ambulance.
May said the fingers were crushed
at the base, making surgery more
difficult. Surgeons had to shorten
each finger about-three-quarters of a
inch to eliminate the most serious
damage.
WHILE BATES WAS being
treated in the emergency room,
pairs of surgeons, working with
microscopes, prepared each finger
for reattachment, labeling 16 nerve
endings, 24 tendons, and 24 arteries
and veins.
Surgeons had to graft veins from
Bates' arms and feet to sections of
the fingers severely mangled by the
iron press.
Bates was then transferred to the
operating . ^om where pairs of
surgeons worked on each hand. The
surgeons worked in shifts, with May
working some 20 hours.
May said Bates already has
recovered partial movement in the
fingers and will have to undergo in-
tense physical therapy before doc-
tors know how much function he will
have in his hands.

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - A car
bomb explosion ripped through the ner-
ve center of the Palestine Liberation
Organization yesterday, killing at least
60 people and wounding about 300, a
PLO spokesman said. The PLO said no
ranking guerilla was hurt, but another
group reported a PLO Central Commit-
tee member was killed.
Witnesses said the blast set off fires,
reduced 60 cars to scorched metal,
splintered telephone poles and hurled
bodies through the air as the ex-
plosives-packed auto blew up in front of
the PLO offices on Bustani Street in
Moslem West Beirut. Explosives exper-
ts estimated 220 pounds of TNT went
off.
LEBANON'S state-run television said
an anonymous caller purporting to
represent a right-wing organization
claimed his group was responsible for
the blast.
The group, the Front for the
Liberation of Lebanon from
Foreigners, has claimed reponsibility
for a series of bombings in the past two
weeks. A total of 54 people perished in
the previous attacks, including 25
people killed Sept. 17 at the PLO's south
Lebanon regional headquarters in
Sidon.
The PLO says the group is an Israeli
front, and that "Israel and its agents in
Lebanon" set off the latest bomb.
IN TEL AVIV, a spokesman for the
Israeli Foreign Ministry denied "all
responsibility for the recent ex-
plosions" and called the charge "one of
the PLO's most outrageous lies so far."
Prime Minister Shafik Wazzan of
U' student
acquitted
in liquor,
sales trial
(Continued from Page 1)
However, another bartender working
that night - Carl Warschauski, a 22-
year-old LSA junior - testified that he
heard the police officer who made the
citation telling Skupin that she did, in
fact, have a stamp on her hand. The
stamp on her hand, Warschauski
testified, was from the Second Chance
bar, 516 E. Liberty, and was to prove
that she had paid a cover charge, not
that she was old enough to drink.
The officer told the court that he did
not remember whether the conver-
sation had taken place.
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

Lebanon also blamed Israel for the at-
tack. "Israel, which has been preven-
ted from launching further air attacks
on Lebanon, has now resorted to other
methods for which it is either directly
responsible or by using its agents in
Lebanon," he said.
He was referring to a U.S.-proposed
July 24 cease-fire that stopped two
weeks of PLO-Israeli fighting in
southern Lebanon.
"If this is going to continue, then we
consider it a serious violation of the
cease-fire agreement," said Shafiq Al
Hout, director of the PLO office in
Lebanon. "We can't stand a cease-fire
on a declared war and face a secret
war."

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Engin. salary hike
'announced by Dec

(Continued from Page 1)
Competition from jobs in private in-
dustry has created an even greater
problem, Mechanical Engineering
Professor Charles Vest said.
"OVER THE LAST few years we
have lost some of our very best people
Sn the young professor category," Vest
said.
Mechanical engineering Assistant
Professor Panos Papalambros said
that corporations come to professors of-
fering salaries that are three times
higher than the University pays.
"In the hot areas like .computer
design you hear of salaries in the
$50,000 to $70,000 range," Papalambros
said.
Schools in the southwest are offering
teaching and research jobs in the
*$30,000 to $35,000 salary range for
freshly graduated Ph.Ds, Papalambros
added.
Professors resist the lure of private
industry and choose to stay at the

University because of loyal
colleagues and the supporti'
tual environment, Papalamb
People also stay at the
because they are devoted t
and teaching, Vest said.
"If your sole motivation
money, then this prograr
help," Vest said.
Dnnt wait for li1ttle birdie

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