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October 01, 1981 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-01

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Page 6-Thursday, October 1, 1981-The Michigan Daily

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ABOT, IKEGROINGOLD FER-

FTC halts monitoring of TV ads

Design flaws to delay
Diablo plant opening

{

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Federal
Trade Commission yesterday killed
what had become perhaps the most
controversial project in its history - an
attempt to ban or otherwise limit the
kinds of commercials shown to children
on television.
The project, formally begun in 1978
with roots reaching back even farther,
had been attacked as "nannyism" by
broadcasters, food producers and other
affected parties. It also earned the
wrath of Congress, which eventually
placed strict limits on what the agency
could do.

THE COMMISSION staff recommen-
ded earlier this year that the
proceeding be scrapped - even though
there is a "legitimate cause for public
concern" - because it would be im-
practical for the agency to try to ban
commercials.
What the agency originally con-
sidered, but never formally proposed,
were:
" A ban on all commercials on shows
aimed at very young children.
" A ban on ads for highly sugared
foods, including candy and some break-
fast cereals, on shows seen by older

children.
" A requirement that advertisers
devote money to public service
messages promoting good dental and
nutritional habits.
"It is not in the public interest to con-
tinue this proceeding," the commission
announcement said. "We seriously
doubt.. . whether a total ban should
ever be imposed on children's adver-
tising at the end of rulemaking
proceedings."
"We cannot justify sacrificing other
important enforcement priorities to its
continuation," it said.

i:

Dean says faculty could be fired

Continued from Page 1)
over the definition of the term
"program," Steiner said.
IT IS ALLOWABLE for the ad-
ministration to discontinue a large
academic program and fire the tenured
faculty within that program. Steiner
said. The administration, however,
cannot discontinue a program that con-
tains one or two faculty members
without being accused of targeting
specific individuals, Steiner added.
"It is an indirect way of getting at in'
dividuals," Steiner said of eliminating

small programs.
Speculation by University professors
was mixed as to whether the ad-
ministration ;will be forced to fire
tenured faculty.
"PRETTY SOON the faculty will be
the only place left (to cut funds)," said
Charles Lehmann, School of Education
professor.
Lehmann said he thought the Univer-
sity did not want to be in the position of
cutting tenured faculty, but added that
it eventually may be forced to.
Bob Sauve, a University ad-
ministration budget adviser, said

yesterday the University may be forced
to cut tenured faculty members if it can
no longer cut administration or support
programs.
"But I imagine it will be a hell of a lot
harder done than said," Sauve said.
Wilfred Kaplan, University
mathematics professor, said the
University already has "slipped a not-
ch" because it is eliminating the
geography department and would suf-
fer even more if the administration
tries to terminate tenured faculty
members.

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP) -
Design flaws at the Diablo Canyon
nuclear power plant affect its ability
to withstand earthquakes and could
delay fuel loading at Unit 1 for
"several weeks," engineers repor-
ted yesterday.
The $2.3 billion seaside plant,
which the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission licensed Sept. 21 for
low-power testing, was the site of a
two-week anti nuclear protest by the
Abalone Alliance which generated
1,901 arrests.
ENGINEERS-FOR Pacific Gas
and Electric Co., which owns the
plant, should know by tomorrow the
extent of modifications needed on
the unit's five seismic pipe supports,
which were built to specifications for
Unit 2 because of a diagram mix-up,
PG&E spokesman Greg Pruett said.
Piping systems in the two domes
were to have been identical but on
opposite sides, Pruett said.
However, it turned out the piping on
Unit 1 was actually built on the
wrong side - as though the plans for
Unit 2 had been used.
"The frames are 180 degrees op-
posite to the design specifications to
which they were built," Pruett said.
"Our engineers are working around

the clock to complete an analysis.
We think we should have a pretty
good handle on the problem and
what it takes to correct it by the end
of this week."
THE NRC, in a staff report issued
in Washington, D.C., said PG&E wa
checking whether wrong diagrams
were used on Unit 2, which is still
under construction. The NRC
analysis also showed four systems to
keep Unit 1's reactor from
overheating could be affected by the
mistake.
Although the protesters' attem-
pted land and sea blockade ended
Monday, arraignments should con-
tinue through tomorrow, Municipal
Court clerk Patty Williams said.
- Among those released yesterday
was actor Robert Blake, who was
arrested during the final blockade
attempt and pleaded no contest to
trespass. Rock star Jackson Browne
was also due for possible arraign-
ment later in the day, she said.
The Alliance, an umbrella group
of 60 anti-nuclear organizations, op-
poses the plant because it is near an
offshore earthquake fault. PG&S's
diagram error further justified their
objections, Alliance spokesman Jeff
Kalbach said yesterday.

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Sunday afternoon concerts in the
Mchigan Thea tre
Oct. 4, 1-4 p.m.-$2.00
SAVAGE*
T. Petty,J. Starship, Heart covers
great originals
Herizon.
an all-female band
THE JOHN VOILES BANNED
power trio
American Music Series NEXT SHOW NOV. 1

(Continued from PaI
about the institutions' responsibilities.
"When the Reagan administration,
was elected, they stopped sending those
crews around the country investigating
schools, and if there is a complaint,'
then they will write you a letter and ask
you to look into the matter. That's a lit-
tle fairer approach and that's the ap-
proach that gets things done in my
opinion," said Canham.
ONE SCHOOL that has been through
the new procedure is Akron. They were
found not to be in compliance with Title
IX at the time of its investigation but
had a three- to five-year projective
program. "We took a wait, look, and
see attitude," said Akron Athletic
Directory Gordon Larsen. "It makes
more sense. We don't need to create a
women's program if there is no in-
terest." He said that athletic depar-
tments can deal with equality on their
own more easily now.
"We were able to work out a satisfac-
tory resolution with Akron because -of
the positive steps that institution has
taken on its own initiative," Education,
Secretary Bell said.
JANE GLICKMAN of the civil rights

office said the department 'can
theoretically cut off federal funds to an
institution that doesn't cooperate.
"Practically, we don't do it," she said.
Talking to university officials is easier
and quicker than lengthy legal battles,
she added.
Canham said the old and new ap-
proaches contrast drastically. "It (the
investigation) was a bizarre experience
that I absolutely will never go through
again. I refuse to talk to them.
"I think that the Reagan ad-
ministration has only changed one
thing in -Title IX and that is the.
harassment aspect of it. When we were
investigated by Title IX they
threatened that you're (the University)
going to lose your federal grants."
University Regents addressed the
non-discrimination issue at a recent
meeting. They adopted on Sept. 18 a
resolution reaffirming their support of
the athletic department's commitment
to non-discrimination. The document
referred to a court decision and indirec-
tly to the Hatch proposal.
THE COURT decision referred to is
the recent Othen v. Ann Arbor School
Board case. In that case, Judge Charles

Future of Title IX up in the air

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Joiner of the Sixth District Court ruled
that Title IX applies only to programs
or activities receiving direct federal
assistance. Since then, the case was
appealed.
Until the appeal decision is.reached
the Department of Education will con-
tinue to enforce the Title IX of 1972, in
the area of athletics and education, said
department official Art Besner last
year.
Glickman also reaffirmed that
statement. Only if the court of appeals
upholds the decision would the civil
rights office stop its investigators, she
said.
Theresa Cusick, informational
assistant at PEER (Project on Equal
Education Rights) said she saw an at-
tack on Title IX on three fronts: the
justice department, the Hatch bill, and
the Department of Education.
She predicted that the result of the
Bush Task Force review will be a
rewritten Title IX regulation. This
would first involve placing the proposed
new federal regulation in the federal
register to invite public comment. If the
public did not strongly oppose it, the
department probably would rewrite the
regulation.
"WE BELIEVE it's a case of large
colleges and universities having to pay
equal scholarships," said Cusick. She
said football "eats up" the men's por-
tion of scholarships and thereby.forces
schools to pay more for women's
scholarships. She said she also believes
recent events have been a "pretty
definite blow against Title IX."
University Affirmative Action Direc-
tor and Title IX coordinator Virginia
Nordby summed it up in this way: "If
all the things being proposed come to '
pass, I think it will be a very major pull-
back (from Title IX) on the part of the
Reagan administration."
Daily
Classifieds get
Results
Call 764-0557

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9 O Oct
15-18 in
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Tickets.at PTP
office in the Mich-
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f4r irk tcn~ - 7R4-n4.a~fl

1V1" +1LiaG V V v vv

TEILHARD CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
IN ANN ARBOR-1981
Pierre Telihard de Chardin (1881-1955) was a great evolutionary thinker. His thinking and writing has brought
about a new vision on evolution and on the destiny of human kind. His thoughts and ideas provide a new matrix
for all disciplines and all aspects of human life. In this sense he is important to us all.
The University of Michigan is honoring this great thinker by arranging a series of symposia on the occasion of his
centennial.
October 1, Thursday 8:00 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"TEILHARD: EARTHING THE VISION" - Dr. John Newson
Dr. John Newsom, a secretary of the Teilhard Centre for the Future of Man, in London, and for many years
editor of the Teilhard Review is a physicist intimately acquainted with Teilhard's thought as well as an original
evolutionary thinker.
November 19, Thursday 8:00 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"THE POLITICS OF COMPASSION: Implications of Teilhard's Thought
for Socio-Political Life Today" - Prof. Robert A. Ludwig
"THE POLITICS OF EVOLUTION EQUALS EPISTEMOLOGY OF BECOMING"
- Prof. Henryk Skolimowski
Prof. Ludwig currently in the Theology Department of Loyola University in Chicago participated earlier this
year in the Boulder Forum on Evolution honoring Teilhard de Chardin.
Prof. Skolimowski is a member of the Humanities Faculty in the College of Engineering and his most recent
publication Eco-Philosophy: Designing New Tactics for Living is an articulation and application of Teilhard's
thought.
December 15, Tuesday 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"HUMAN PEACEMAKING AND THE EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS" - Prof. Elise Boulding
..__t . _ L* t aL _._ _ 1.. . * .1 8 . . . ..a r- ... .8 L -L. -....d 1- ->. -- 4 . U . _ ... T,

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