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September 30, 1981 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-30

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The Michigan Doily-Wednesday, September 30, 1981-Page 7

Hot kisses on a guerrilla tour

Discover Flying
for '20

FLYERS

By RJ SMITH
These days Tom Carson does not exactly believe in
,winning over his readers with sweet talk. This is the
opening sentence to his new novel, Twisted Kicks:
" Three days after Erica slashed her wrists with a
piece of glass from the mirror-she'd smashed in the
psycho ward of the hospital where they had pumped
''her stomach and put her back under observation af-
'*;'her previous attempt, Dan Lang came back to
40W, THAT IS an intro that makes contact, as the
Firesign Theater used to say - like the hot kiss at
.AhQ end of 'a cold fist..
.Carson is the phenom of the New York rock critics,
> ,graduate from Princeton in '77 who writes
w larly on the music for Rolling Stone, The Village
':ce, The Boston Phoenix, and New York Rocker.
Carson writes with none of the entertaining wildness
endemic to many New York writers; his reviews are
dense with ideas, thoughtful, and at their best not for

quick scanning.
Though it is well-crafted, Twisted Kicks makes the
kind of attention-grabbing unruly noises rock writing
does not. To make sure that noise gets heard, Carson
has embarked on a "guerrilla tour" across the coun-
try, packing a station wagon full of copies ofehis book
and giving readings in punk clubs, record stores,
boarding houses, marinas, Jesuit seminaries - any
place that will have him.
THE TOUR WILL spend four days in Ann Arbor,
starting tomorrow. Carson will give a reading at 9
p.m. at East Quad's Halfway Inn, will be at the Star
Bar Friday and Saturday with Ragnar Kvaran and
the Flexibles, and with Ragnar again at Rick's on
Sunday. He also will be singing autographs at
Schoolkids, Sunday at 5 p.m.
Just what will happen when he appears on stage is
another matter. On his tour through the south, which
preluded the Ann Arbor stop, Carson sometimes sim-
ply read from his book, on other occasions doing so

with recorded accompaniment and even with live
bands backing him up on stage (REM in Atlanta).
Carson says some of the readings have been taped
and may well end up on National Public Radio.
A TRUE CHAMPION of new American music, and
practically the only writer actually going out and
hearing new bands not performing in the media mec-
cas, Carson has become a key rock writer since the
punk explosion. He says he's taking notes on this tour.
"So far I've seen an awful lot that intertests me," he
remarked. "I'd imagine at some point I will be
writing on individual ban's I have seen, or even as
everything."
A-rock fiction reading in the '80s? Bongos will be
checked at the door of the Half Way, thank you.'Ac-
tually, what's happening is Carson is reaching out to
find out just who his, and the rock and roll, audience
is. It's a gutsy experiment. This isn't the time for
happenings and be-ins, but as for twisted kicks, they
have never been so in fashion.

The Michigan Flyers is offering Lr...J
to anyone affiliated with the 44
University of Michigan an introductory
flying lessonfor just $20.
No matter what you're doing now you could learn to pilot on
airplane. For information call 994-6208.
See the airplane on the diag from Tues.. Sept. 29 to Fri..
Oct. 2.
VAN FROM MICHIGAN UNION TO ANN ARBOR
AIRPORT SAT. and SUN.; EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR
9 A.M.-4 P.M.

.j
,.

.I

Haig-Gromyko talks
fail to resolve eonflicts

From AP and UPI
UNITED NATIONS - Secretary
of State Alexander Haig said yester-
day his talks with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko failed to
resolve "areas of intense
disagreement" between the two
superpowers. But he said the, fact
they talked at all was a good sign.
"I suppose there is progress in any
such communication," Haig said of
the meetings Monday and last Wed-
nesday. "We had a whole host of
areas of intense disagreement bet-
ween the two powers and we had an
opportunity to explore the basis of
allthoseissues.'
HAIG SAID he and Gromyko
agreed between them to say little
about the 'meetings. They also
agreed to continue the discussions
early next year, probably in Geneva.,

But Haig said he did come away with
the feeling that the Soviets are as
anguished as the United States over
the situation in Poland.
Haig had said prior to the meeting
he would warn Gromyko against
Soviet military intervention in
Poland. He said yesterday, "We'
have made it very clear, together
with our allies, the consequences of
Soviet intervention 'would be
profound and long-lasting."
Meanwhile, Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger, in a presen-
tation beamed by satellite to
Europe, unveiled a slick gover-
nment booklet on Soviet military
might yesterday, saying he hopes it
will convince Europeans and
Americans of a "real and growing"
Soviet threat.
THE BOOKLET came out less

than 24 hours after Secretary of
State Haig's meeting with Gromyko
and within days of an expected an-
nouncement by President Reagan on
his decision about the MX missile
and bomber programs.
Despite-its profusion of facts,,
charts and pictures, however, the 99-
page booklet titled "Soviet Military
Power" provides little in terms of
numbers that was not already
available in previous assessments
by the' government or independent
agencies.
'At the news conference Wein-
berger said the new booklet's value
is in presenting "more information
onthe USSR's armed forces than had
been previously available under one
cover."

Body Heat
(Continued from Page 5)
as he stares, wild-eyed, into Walker's
home from outside, and on her face as
she stares back, nostrils quivering. He
grabs a chair, smashes it through a
glass door, and. dashes for her;
simultaneously, the camera lunges
forward behind him and does not move
from the couple's.reckless embrace. }
William Hurt and Kathleen Turner
are wonderfully cast here; they are two
performers who simply exude
sexuality. Kasdan deliberately uses
newcomers to the medium as his stars;
this is Hurt's third film and Turner's
first. As a result, the acting feels fresh
and uninhibited, the characters
completely~genuine.
Body Heat is not without its flaws.
Kasdan gets so wrapped up in creating
atmosphere that he occasionally
forgets about emphasizing character.
Because of this there is, at times, an
emotional distancing from Racine
which does not serve any real purpose.
These problems, however, are minor
considering Kasdan's cinematic
achievements here. Body Heat un-
deniably establishes him as an impor-
tant new director.
THURSDAY, OCT. 1
7;30 p.m.
Coalition against
The Family
Protection Act
MICHIGAN UNION
Wekler Room
Discussion of Legal, Social,
and Political aspects of The
Family Protection Acf.

__
_
r'

T-APPY-'HOUR UNTO. C LO5e
MEZ,1CALaN ' t'EnTAL STuEEThS

EX CDJK P IL.

Financial markets face uncertainty

-I
__
lh _

gy' 4 i Rsr' _ - -
- FE NCEL GRA~ioN

* I.

From AP and UPI
NEW YORK - Financial markets,
always a fragile system of exchange,
iseem increasingly frazzled as well in a
world of mounting economic uncertain-
ty.
The evidence is abundant: in stock
and bond'markets, in foreign exchange
trading and in commodity markets.
Prices have beei' yo-ybing,'.and some
people have been talking about
"'worldwide recession" and "panic."
THEGLOOM may be overdone, but
the jitters remain. Wild gyrations in the
world's stock markets this' week were
only the latest and most dramatic
example of how extraordinarily sen-
sitive the markets have become.
In Tokyo, 'for example, the stock
market suffered its biggest single-day

loss in history Monday. Then in a spec-
tacular reversal, it rallied yesterday to
its argest one-day gain in history.
Analysts said overseas markets took
a cue from Wall Street, which exploded
in an 18.55 points rebound Monday
despite American market guru Joseph
Granville's grim forecast for one of the
worst routs in U.S. financial history.
MOST FOREIGN traders ignored
Granville's latest prophecy that Wall
Street's strong showing Monday was
merely a "bounce" and that the market
soon would resume its dramatic decline
before hitting bottom in 1982.
On the London stock market, which
sustained severe losses Monday on
Granville's prediction that an inter-
national market crash would follow the
projected bloodbath on Wall Street,

prices closed sharply higher.
Marty stock market analysts at-
tribute the worldwide slump to fears
about the effects on the U.S. economy of
chillingly high interest rates: Many in-
vestors also fear that if the Reagan
administration fails to meet its goal of
budget cutting, extensive government
borrowing could keep rates high and
lead to a severe recession.
SAlse underrmining confidence, in
curgncy a ad other markets are
growing doubts, particularly in
Europe, about the administration's
commitment to fighting inflation. Many
market specialists suspect the ad-
ministration is pressuring the Federal
Reserve Board to ease its tight-money
policy, which is aimed at controlling in-
flation, in order to avoid weakening the
economy.

RYEMUSIC

1

z ,- . I I , . I - 44 Fr4 ,

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