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September 29, 1981 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-29

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 29, 1981 -Page 5
Springboks rugby team leaves
for 'hero's welcome' at home

NEW YORK (AP) - Under extreme
security, the world-renowned
Springboks rugby team took off yester-
day for their racially segregated South
-African homeland, after a violence-
marred, three-game tour of the United
States.
The group departed Kennedy airport
at 7:55 p.m. EDT aboard South African
Airways' Flight 202 for a 17-hours one-
stop flight to Johannesburg, as more
than 100 heavily geared police stoody
by.
THERE WERE no demonstrators on

hand-and no trouble as the Springboks
departed. The boarding area for the
flight was sealed in mid-afternoon and
all vehicles entering the sector were
searched for weapons and explosives.
Other passengers boarded ahead of
the team, which was bused from a
nearby airport hotel to planeside for
' boarding at the last minute.
CO-PASSENGERS with the
Springboks included the Old Ed's rugby
team, a club-level group from South
Africa. It recently completed a series of

nine games in Milwaukee, Chicago,
Boston and Orlando, Fla., on what
might be termed rugby's minor league
level.
"We haven't had one single bad word
said to us," said team member Allan
Antoncich, 28, contrasting their treat-
ment in this country with the
Springboks.
In Johannesburg, a South African
newspaper, the Citizen, said the
Springboks would get a hero's
welcome.

Army official admits

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
STOCKWELL RESIDENTS shape up in a Dance for Fitness class, one of 12 dance classes being offered this term at
several dormitories.
Adult Activities Program holds
. dance classes in dormitories

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) - A
former Army warrant officer interrup-
ted his federal trial yesterday and
pleaded guilty to conspiring to sell
military secrets to the Soviet Union
over a 17-year period. In return, the
Justice Department dropped three
counts of espionage.
Sentencing for Joseph Helmich was
set for Nov. 5. The maximum penalty is
life imprisonment.
HELMICH,;44, who made his surprise
plea as his trial entered its second
week, insisted that the information he
relayed to the Russians was not as im-
portant as the government contended.
Under questioning by U.S. District
Judge Susan Black, Helmich admitted
that he contacted Soviet agents in Paris
in January 1963, while he was facing a
possible court-martial because of bad
checks.
Between January 1963 and July 1964,
a Soviet KGB agent paid him $131,000
for information about the KL-7 Cyr-

ptosystem, including the coding
machine's parts, repair and main-
tenance manuals and lists of codes, the
count said.
HOWEVER, THE KL-7 machine
wasn't as important to the armed for-
ces in 1963 as the government had con-
tended, said Helmich, who was based in
Paris with the U.S. Signal Corps.
"Anything that was being passed (on
the KL-7) was no longer being used on
the first line of defense," Helmich said
in a hushed tone. "It was really getting
limited use."
NEVERTHELESS, the information
ranged from classified to top-secret, he
confirmed.
Helmich, who had pleaded innocent
to all four counts on July 16, denied en-
tering the conspiracy to hurt the United
States. But he did tell Mrs. Black he
knew he was dealing with the Russians
and that the Soviets would use the in-
'formation to their fullest.
"Your honor, while I knew it was to

espionage
the advantage,of a foreign nation, it
wasn't done with the intent to injure the
United States of America," said
Helmich.
The plea change was made after
jurors heard an FBI agent testify
Friday about Helmich's confession, in
which he described the initial meeting
at the Soviet Embassy in Paris, later
meetings with a KGB agent at the
Soviet Trade Mission, and shuttles from
Fort Bragg, N.C. to Paris.

(Continued from Page 1)
"People seem really excited," said
Howells as she packed away her tape
player after class. "They're more en-
thusiastic and committed than ever."
IN ADDITION TO accommodating
students who have been closed out of
dance classes at the CCRB, Weikart
9 hopes the program will reach studen-
ts-especially freshpersons-who have
been discouraged from taking dance
classes in the past because of the incon-
venient location of the CCRB.
"Freshmen are afraid at this point to
take on something new," Howell said.
But she said program 'administrators
are delighted with the increased
enrollment of freshpersons in the dorm
classes.

'Students are -healthier, have a better outlook on
life, and do better academically when they round
their schedules with activity.'
-Phyllis Weikart,
Adult Activities Program Coordinator

I

i

Since the classes are smaller than the
CCRB sections, which average about 60,
students, there is room -for more
students in the dorm sections, Weikart
said. If demand increases, new sections
may be created at other dorms, she
said.
Since the Adult Activities Program
services non-students as well, the dorm
classes are open to people outside the

University, Weikart said. Information
on schedules and times can be obtained
at the sponsoring dorms.
"Meeting this increased demand for
exercise classes is important," Weikart
explained. Because "Students are
healthier, have a better outlook on life,
and do better academically when they
round out their schedules with an ac-
tivity."

2 INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
* -5*I A"e t Lberty 7#1-9700 a
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT-
LAST 7 DAYS!
"A KNOCKOUT!"
-VincentkCanby,
New York Times
GtENDA JACKSON
As
" 'DAILY-7:10, 9:10
fWED.-1:00, 3:00, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10
' TUESDAYI
" ALLSEATS-ALLNIGHT
" 0 EVERYDAY LOW
(EXCEPT TES)
"" ENDS IN 3 DAYSI
S BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
"
"
"
"
" 4
"
DA ILY--6:50, 9:30
WED.-1:20, 4:14,6:50,9:30

.Stereo stolen from Bursley dorm room

A break-in of a ground floor dorm
room of Bursley Hall early Satuday
resulted in property theft and damage
totaling $985.
The room's two residents, music
sophomore. Scott Kiehner, and LSA
freshman Christopher Porter, found
their screen torn, window smashed, and
several items missing or damaged
when they returned to their room at

about 8 p.m. Saturday, said Building
Director Caroline Gould. Gould said the
two had been away for a day.
BRAD MCNIFF, a resident of the.
,hall, said he woke=up after hearing a,
"loud, sharp smash" between 2 and 6
a:m. Saturday, but fell back asleep.
Taken were 112 record albums valued
at $750, a clock radio, two calculators,
head phones.. Seventy-five dollars wor-

th of damage was done to the stylus of
the stereo, which was chained down.
Gould said the curtains of the room
were drawn so the contents weren't
visibles. "whoever broke in," she said,
"knew what they wanted."
Police have no suspects.

HARRISON TPR OF THEs "
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YOU'LL BE IMPORTANT FROM THE DAY YOU ARRIVE!

Break-in on South U.
Five hundred and fifteen dollars wor-
th of jewelry and cash' were taken
Saturday from an apartment on the 900
block of S. University, police reported
yesterday. The thief entered by prying
the screen and opening the window.

Pizza stolen
A man was robbed of his pizza and $23
early Sunday morning when two males
in their late teens accosted him on Hill
and Oa'kland. They forcefully took the
food and money before fleeing, police
said.

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