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September 27, 1981 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-27

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10

RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS
OF CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS
SERIES OF LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS
Every Monday night a subject of current major interest will
-be discussed at The Ecumenical Campus Center, 921 Church
" Street. Everyone is welcome to these discussions. Beginning
at 7:30 p.m., with refreshments, the speaker or speakers will
make their presentation and engage in discussion until
4.:00 P.M.
COME JOIN USI
MONiDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th
Speaker: DR. DAVID N. FREEDMAN
"AMERICAN RELIGIOUS CONVICTIONS
IN A CHANGING WORLD"
Dr. Freedman is Director of the Program in Religious Studies and Professor of
Near Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan, and co-author of the
Anchor Bible Series. He will speak on the necessity of new religious.
convictions for Americans and the relations of those to our religious roots.
AT THE
Ecumenical Campus Center
921 Church Street
For additional information,
Please call 662-5529

SPORTS

Page 8 Sunday, September 27, 1981. The Michigan Daily
SPOR TS OF THE DAILY

0

Spi kers win marathon

By CHUCK HARTWIG ,
"It was a kind of marathon," said
Michigan volleyball coach Sandy Vong,
referring to his teams' grueling victory
in yesterday's Wolverine Invitational
Volleyball Tournament. The match
lasted 11 hours arjd nine minutes.
The spikers tookhome the trophy by
overcoming Lake. Superior - State
College 15-9, 8-15, 15-6 in the final.
Earlier, they had beaten Grand Valley
State College in the semi-finals 15-10

TEILHARD CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
IN ANN ARBOR-1981
SPierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) was a great evolutionary thinker. His thinking and writing has brought
about a new vision on evolution and on the destiny of human kind. His thoughts and ideas provide a new matrix
for all disciplines and all aspects of human life. In this sense he is important to us all.
The University of Michigan is honoring this great thinker by arranging a series of symposia on the occasion of his
centennial.
October 1, Thursday 8:00 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"TEILRAtD EARTHING THE VISION"- Dr. John Newson
Dr. John Newsom, a secretary of the Teilhard Centre for the Future of Man, in London, and for many years
editor of the Telihard Review is a physicist intimately acquainted with Teilhard's thought as well as an original
evolutionary thinker.
November 19, Thursday 8:00 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"THE POLITICS OF COMPASSION: Implications of Teilhard's Thought
for Socio.Political Life Today" - Prof. Robert A. Ludwig
"THE POLITICS OF EVOLUTION EQUALS EPISTEMOLOGY OF BECOMING"
- Prof. Henryk Skolimowski
Prof. Ludwig currently in the Theology Department of Loyola University in Chicago participated earlier this
year in the Boulder Forum on Evolution honoring Teilhard de Chardin.
Prof. Skollmowski is a member of the Humanities Faculty in the College of Engineering and his most recent
publication Eco-Philosophy: Designing New Tactics for Living is an articulation and application of Teilhard's
thought.
Decenber 15, Tuesday 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"HUMAN PEACEMAKING AND THE EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS" - Prof. Elise Boulding
Prof. Moulding is Chair of the Sociology Department at Dartmouth. Three of her recent books are-The
Underside of History: A View of Women Through Time, Women in 'the Twentieth Century World, and Women:
The Fifth World.
December 15, Tuesday 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre
"EVOLUTION OF RELIGION" - Prof. Kenneth Boulding
Prof. Boulding is a member of the Faculty in Economics at Univ. of Colorado. Among his many publica-
tions are Meaning of the 20th Century, Social System of the Planet Earth, and Ecodynamics: A New Theory
of Societal Evolution.
A Panel Discussion with Professors Boulding and Professor Skolimowski will follo& this
evening presentation.
THESE SYMPOSIA ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Sponsorship includes Program on Studies in Religion,
Office of Ethics and Religion and the Humanities Faculty of the College of Engineering.

and 15-5 to reach the finals.
OVERALL, THE women lost only one
match in the tournament, to Lake
Superior State, as they notched a 5-1
record in the tourney, beating Bowling
Green State University 1-4, 15-2, Ferris
State, 14-16, 15-11, and 16-14, along with
defeating Grand Valley and Lake
Superior in the semi-finals and finals
respectively.
The tournament had an eight-team
field which included Bowling Green,
Ferris State, George Williams College
(Chicago), Grand Valley, Indiana State
University, Lake Superior State,
Schoolcraft College, and the
Wolverines. The format consisted of
round-robin play in two divisions with
the top six teams advancing to the
playoffs.r
Michigan finished second in -its
division and went into the lower bracket
in the playoffs. Lake Superior State and
Grand Valley were the winners of the
two divisions. The Wolverines came on
strong in the playoffs, however, to
overwhelm Schoolcraft College, along

with the two divisional winners to grab
the championship.
AFTERWARD, CoachVong was very'
pleased with his team. "This is a good
win for them because they really had to
come back (to win), said Vong. "When
the chips were-down, they played really
hard." Vong explained that in a really
tough tournament like this one,"'When
athletes are tired, they need par-
ticularly strong mental character."
The players were also thrilled with
the win. "It's the first time we've ever
won our tournament," said Jeanne
Weckler, who filled in most of the tour-
nament for Alison Noble, one of the
starters, who injured her arm early in
the day.
The spikers' next action will be Oc-
tober 1st versus Schoolcraft at the Cen-
tral Campus Recreation Building
(CCRB). Vong said that "the team is
progressing about what I expected." He
says that he is continuing to "stress the
team concept."

ourney
Duran wins decision
LAS VEGAS (AP) - Roberto Duran
continued his' way back on the
comeback trail yesterday by pounding
out a unanimous 10-round decision over
a tough but outclassed Luigi Minchillo.
Duran, winning his second con-
secutive fight since abruptly quitting in
the eighth round of his welterweight
title defense against Sugar Ray
Leonard last November, looked sharp
against Minchillo and dominated the
fight thoroughly.
THERE WERE no knockdowns in the
fight although Duran stunned Minchillo
.several times in the late rounds.
Durpn was cut under the right eye by
an aipparent butt in the third round bit-
the cut was never reopened by .Min-
chillo. ,
Judge Dave Moretti scored the bout
100-91, judge Hal Miller had Duran 98-92-,
and judge Paul Smith gave Duran
every round in scoring it 100-90.
THE ASSOCIATED Press had Duran.
in front 99-91.
Duran came in at 154 pounds, a pound
less than his first comeback fight in
August when he pounded out a 10-round
decision over Nino Gonzales in
Cleveland. Minchillo, the European
junior middleweight champion,
weighed in at 153 .
Minchillo, of Italy, carried the fight to
Duran in the early rounds, swarming
over the former lightweight and
welterweight champion in attempting
to maulhim around.
But Duran scored effectively with
combinations and managed to keep
Minchillo off balance with upper cuts
and short left hooks.

Discover flying
for 20

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FL YER.

The Michigan Flyers is offering
to anyone offiliated with the.
University of Michigan an introductory
flying lesson for just $20.

No matter what you're doing now you could learn to pilot on-
airplane. For information call 994-6208.
See the airplane on the diag from Tues., Sept. 29 to Fri.,
Oct. 2. Membership meeting Tuesday evening 7:30 P.M.
at the Michigan Union.

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ou'll pay $25
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SCORES
Baseball
American League
Milwaukee 4, Detroit 3
Minnesota 7,.lexas 3
Cleveland 7, Boston 2
California 6, Toronto 3
Oakland 5, Chicago 1
k I gNational League
Montreaf4, New York 2
Cincinnati 2, Atlanta 0
St. Louis 5, Pittsburg 3
College Football
Big Ten
MICHIGAN 21, Navy 16
Wisconsin 21, Western Michigan 10
Syracuse 21, Indiana 7
Michigan State 10, Bowling Grben 7
Iowa 20, UCLA 7
Utah 42, Northwestern 0
Minnesota 42, Oregon State 12
Purdue 15, Notre Dame 14
Ohio State 24, Stanford 19 .
EAST
Brdgwater, Mass. 9, Framingham St. 0
California, Pa. 16, Slippery Rock 0
Cathdlic U. 23, Gallaudet 21.
Cent. Connecticut 28, E. Stroudsburg 17
Frnkln & Marsh[l 52, Dickinson 0
Lebanon Val. 14, Swarthmore 7
Tufts 18, Trinity, Conn. 14
W. Chester St. 19, Delaware St. 16
Westmnstr, Pa. 14, Clarion St. 0
American Intl. 17, Norwich 12
Bates 14, Amherst 0
Bowdoin 30, Hamilton 13
Cortland St. 41, N.Y. Tech 14
Holy Cross 33, Harvard 19
Maine Maritime 42, W. New England 7
Massachusetts 10, Dartmouth 8
New Hampshire 31, Towson St. 29
Sheperd 20, West Liberty 6
SOUTH
E. Kentucky 37, Akron 0
Georgia 24,S. Carolina 0
Mississippi St. 28, Florida 7
Wash. & Lee 24, Centre 14
Duke 29, Virginia 24
Memphis St. 28, Georgia Tech 15
N. Carolina 56, Boston College 14
S. Mississippi 17, Richmond 10
Tennessee 10, Auburn 7
VMI 31, William & Mary 14
Virginia St. 17, St. Paul's 14
Virginia Tech 30, Wake Forest 14
MIDWEST
Anderson 34, Bluffton 0
Arkansas St. 26, Cent. Michigan 23
Ashland 24, Northwd, Mich. 13
Baldwin-Wallace 38, Heidelberg 0
Dubuque 14, Luther 12
Ferris St. 27, Michigan Tech 6
Franklin 28, Hope 14
Huron 15, Mayville St..8
Iowa St. 28, Kent St. 19
Ohio U. 30, Ball St. 27 '
Penn St. 30, Nebraska 24
Saginaw Val. St. 35, St. Joseph, Ind. 25
S. Dakota St.17, Nebraska-Omaha 10
Taylor 14, Defiance 7
Thiel 54, Case Western 13
Wooster 20, Ohio Weslyn 14
Beloit 26, Chicago 6
Cent. Methodist 19, Culver-Stockton 15
Coe 49, Knox 13
Drake 18, Kansas St. 17
Evansville 31, Butler 10
Gustav Adolphus 16, Bethel, Minn. 6
Kansas21, Kentucky 16
Kenyon 37. Oberlin 0
Lawrence 26, Concordia, Moor. 6
Macalester 27, Augsburg 24
FAR WEST
Adams St. 13, Colorado Mines 13, tie
Montana St. 35, Simon Fraser 14
Montana Tech 17, W. Montana 7
N, Colorado 13, Morningside 3

0

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