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September 27, 1981 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-27

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The Michigan Gaily-Sunday, September 27, 1981-Page 5

Science fiction fair
draws crowd at Union

By ANDREW CHAPMAN
Who said, "Gort, Klaatu barrada nic-
to?" What is Tanstaafl? What does it
say on the cover of the Hitchhiker's.
Guide to the Galaxy?"
These and other topics of interest to
*cience fiction fans were among those
discussed at yesterday's Science Fic-
tion and Fantasy Fair held in the
Michigan Union.
THE PAIR WAS sponsored by the
Stilyagi Air Corps, a science fiction
club which takes its name from Robert
Heinlein's novel, The Moon is a Harsh
Mistress.
Events at the fair included an art
Chow, a book sale, and numerous talks
nd panel discussions with science fic-
tion fans and authors.
Fain Director Leah Zeldes said the

fair succeeded in its purpose of attrac-
ting new members to the club, which
meets every Wednesday in the Union.
"WE'VE ALREADY had 135 people
come in," she said, adding that she ex-
pected to see the total to exceed 200
before the fair ended.
The event attracted many unusual-
looking participants - people with
green faces roamed the halls, a man
travelled with a Muppet-like creature
casually draped on his arm.
Speakers at the fair included author
Lloyd Biggle, Ted Reynolds, and
Marray Yaco. Biggle's works include A
Whirligig in Time, Watchers in the
Dark, and Monument."
THE 12 ARTISTS represented at the
fair, most of whom were members of
Stilyagi Air Corps, offered works for
sale ranging in price from $5 to $40.

Zeldes said that money earned from
the book sale, art sale, and entrance
fees, went to the expenses of financing
the fair.
"This is basically a publicity thing to
get students interested," saidNancy'
Tucker, chairman of the Local Conven-
tion Committee.
THE CORPS also sponsors a yearly
science fiction convention called "Con-
fusion." "Confusion" used to be held in
Ann Arbor, but because of an increase
in the number of participants, the group
was forced to move the event to
Plymouth, Zeldes explained.
By the way, the answers to the three
"stumpers" are: Helen Benson in the
movie The Day the Earth Stood Still,
the name of the Stilyagi Air Corps
newsletter, and last, but not least'
"Don't panic."

Doily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
A GROUP OF science fiction fans act ghoulish at the Science Fiction Fair at the Union yesterday. From left to right are
Anthony Klish of Wayne, Chuck Shefferly of Dearborn, Homer Stone and Amy Crowe, both of Wayne.

Pre-teen
rape victim

fights for

$I

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
LSA SENIOR JOE Ceterski sells his favorite authors at the Science Fiction FAr yesterday.

JFraternities see
in RushWee k ac

(Continued from Page 1)
SO, LIKE most other houses, Delta
Chi decides on an individual basis to
whom they will extend an invitation to
pledge the house.
Likewise, Sigma Phi Epsilon
*ssistant Rush Chairman Russ Marsh
said, "Our two main considerations are
how the potential pledge will fit in with
the guys and if he can contribute to the'
house."
Marsh said many of the potential
pledges for Sigma Phi Epsilon already
know one or more of the active mem-
bers. "About half of the guys in the
house knew somebody before they,
joined."
STEVE VANTASSEL, a sophomore
member of Sigma Chi, echoed Marsh's
Aktatements almost to the letter: "We
ook at a potential pledge's outside ac-
tivities, his interest in the house and
what friends he might have that are ac-
tivemembers."
But forget the stated requirements,
what are the differences in the houses?
Despite what several rush chairmen
said about the reputations of their
houses-reputation-according to
h anTassel, plays at least some role in
he selection of a fraternity. "Some
houses emphasize an active social life
while others stress being a really close
group. Then you have your jock houses
and your prep houses, etc.
That's why rushees are urged to visit
as many fraternities as possible the fir-
st two nights of Rush Week, when the
idea is to get a view of a variety of
houses, get tours of the buildings and
meet a few people in each fraternity to
help narrow the selection, VanTassel
*aid.
REPASKY SAID the initial encounter
between a rushee and Phi Delta Theta
member consists of "a house tour,
some eats and your basic BS."
After the first day of Rush, which was
last Sunday from 4-10 p.m., most
fraternities extend invitations to
prospective pledges to have dinner at
the house.
These informal -dinners ran from
onday through Thursday, after which
there were more open parties from 7-10
p.m. with more house tours, small talk
and nervous tension.
BUT HESS SAID he believes Sunday
Horse Drawn
Hay and Sleigh
wa w

is the most important day of Rush
Week, especially for Delta Chi, one of
the smaller fraternities at the Univer-
sity.
"Getting the potential pledge into the
house on Sunday is most important. He
has got to see the'house and meet the
people to have a reason to come back
later in the week," Hess said.
-To attract the rushees on Sunday
fraternities usually serve hot dogs or
hamburgers and beer. The food is a big
drawing card for the houses,
because-unlike sorority rush-rushees
are left on their own to decide how
much time they'll spend at each place
and how many places they intend to
visit that firstnight.,
"IT WAS A good way to get away
from dorm food," adnmitted Manny
Gallas, an LSA freshman considering
pledging Delta Chi. The hamburgers
and beer Phi Delta Theta served were,
an attraction "because the dorms don't
serve Sunday dinner," added Repasky.
But food and drink aside, the time
I wI~I~WI' '1. ' I

icrease
/ tivity
comes for each fraternity to issue bids,
nearing the end of the process. The
houses give their bids out to any num-
b'r of rushees, depending on the size of
the house, space limitations, but
primarily on how many rushees the
members believe are "qualified" to
join their ranks. t
Sigma Phi Epsilon, which Marsh said
hopes to increase the active member-'
ship of the fraternity (now at 44), issued
27 bids. Sigma Alpha Mu, which
ushered about 85 people through its
halls on Sunday, issued from 15 to 20
bids, according to Roth. Hess said his
fraternity, Delta Chi, would be issuing
up to 10 bids and hopes to get about five
pledges to add to their current mem-
bership of 25. And so on down the line.
It remains to be seen how many new
members each house will get this fall,
even though most fraternity officials
have said this rush has been better than
average, and that they expect an even
better one in the winter.

abortion
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A 12-
year-old girl who became pregnant and
contracted a venereal disease during a
gang rape is fighting in court for an
abortion her mother opposes on
religious grounds.
The state Supreme Court could rule
on the case as early as tomorrow. The
child is nearly three months pregnant,
and doctors say giving birth could en-
danger her life.
THE MOTHER, a member of the
Church of the Holiness, wants the high
court to uphold her contention that she
is entitled to make the decision because
her daughter is too young to make such
decisions for herself.
Michelle Porta,court-appointed at-
torney for the mother, said the woman
believes that if God wants the pregnan-
cy terminated, the girl will have a
miscarriage.
The state; however, contends the girl
has the right to the abortion she desires.
The girl seeks an abortion because of
her age and of the pregnancy's possible
impact on her health.
LAST WEEK, Special Judge Donald
Manning made the girl a ward of the
court and ordered her pregnancy ter-
minated. However, he stayed his ruling
to give the mother time-to appeal and
because there is no state law dealing
with such a case and no court rulings on
the subject.
Ms. Porta, asked by a reporter if the
mother was concerned about medical
reports that pregnancy would endanger
the child's life, said, "That is not the
issue. The issue is the mother's objec-
tion to the abortion on religious groun-
ds."
Ms. Porta said the girl was "raped by
three males, who apparently were of
about high school age."

eipse
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For more Information call 763-6922
TUESDAY LUNCH-DISCUSSION
SEPTEMSER 29-12N00N
"ENERGY POLICY IN AFRICA:
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STRATEGIES"
Speaker: PROF. ERNEST J. WILSON,
Political Science Department U. 'ofM.
at the INTERNATIONAL CENTER
603 E. Madison Street
Lunch $1.00
For additional information,
'' please call 662-5529

mo -- J

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