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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1981 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RECOVERING FROM SURGERY
McCormick may sit out

By MARK FISCHER
It was Spring, 1980, and there was a
war going on. A recruiting war, that is.
Dozens of colleges nationwide were
fighting for the services of a 6-1p hoop-
ster from 'Clarkston-a high school All-
American who' many predicted could
turn a team around by himself.
Michigan eventually won the war
and, as the spoils of war go to the "Vic-
tors," to Ann Arbor went Tim McCor-
mick.
MICHIGAN HOOP fans watched the
freshman's first season with great ex-
pectations, but there was one problem.
McCormick, the doctors. said, suffered
from an athletic affliction called "jum-
per's knee"-a looseness in the knee
tendons which makes it painful to jump.
McCormick was the Wolverines' six-
*th man and he managed to play in each
of their games last year, but the knees
did give him problems.
"I don't want to make excuses or
anything," said the modest-sophomore
last Wednesday. "But I saw doctors in
California that said I was probably
playing at about 50% efficiency. I knew
I was playing with pain, how much it
was affecting me I really can't tell. I
know it was in the back of my mind."
WHEN IT GOT to the point where he

was "playing at a level I didn't think
was up to my expectations," McCor-
mick opted for surgery. On June 15,
1981, the left knee went under; excess
calcium was removed, and the lateral
tendon was released. Two months later
the right knee underwent essentially
the same process.
So now that it's Fall, 1981, McCor-
mick finds himself involved in yet
another battle-you might call it "The
Battle of Wounded Knees." McCor-
mick's foes are the pain and weakness
in those joints, but he has been doing all
he can to combat them.
"I've been rehabilitating both legs
pretty intensely," he said. "I've got a
pretty strenuous program I've been
going through everyday, involving
swimming, a lot of repetitious-type
exercises such as, leg raises, and
Nautilus work, weightlifting."
MCCORMICK SAID he thought his
rehabilitation was coning along "pret-
ty fast," but how fast -is that? Fast
enough to allow the sophomore center
to'play in 1981-81?
"It's really difficult to say at this
point," the cager answered, noting that
"every set of knees is different, every
operation is different."
There is the possibility that McCor-

mick would join the team in midseason
if the situation warranted it, although
his coach, Bill Frieder, said "I don't
think there's any way he'll play before
the Big Ten" part of the season, which
begins January 7 at home against
Wisconsin.
One thing is for sure: as much as he

Wishes he could, McCormick won't mix
it up with the other big boys on the har-
dwood before his knees are wholly
healthy. "I want to play, and I'm going
to push it as hard as I can to get back,"
he said. "But if my knees aren't 100
percent it'll be foolish for me to play. I
could just reinjure it."
THINGS ARE looking good in general
for the amiable hoopster, however,
largely because his knees are now
giving him comparatively no pain.
"I'm very happy about that aspect of
the operation;" McCormick said. "I
went into the operation with pain in
both legs and I came out with none at
all. There's no pain there even when
I'm doing some rehabilitation exercises
on the Nautilus machines that gave me
pain before the operations.
"I have no idea at this point what the
end results of the operation will be, but
if it continues with no pain, the
operation was definitely a success."
What the end results of the 1981-82
Michigan hoop campaign will be
without McCormick's services -also
remains a mystery at this point.
There is no doubt, though, that the
Wolverines - a team with only one
returning starter (senior Thad Garner)
and no proven center - could surely
use a healthy Tim McCormick.

The Michigan Daily Saturday, September 26, 1"1---Page 9
Tig,~ers loso-Ae
i h Bo
By LARRYFREED
special to the Daily .ti
DETROIT - Ong strike. t
That's all that separated Jack Morris and the division4eading Detroit
Tigers from victory last night. Unfortunately for Morris and 35,003 fever-
swept fans in Tiger Stadium, that strike never carne. Instead, Robin Yount
sent the pitch into the left field stands to thus carry the Milwaukee Brewers
over the Tigers, 8-6.
To make matters worse, the Red Sox jumped into a tie for first with the
Tigers after their 5-4 victory earlier over the Cleveland Indians.
Yount's three-run blast must have triggered Morris' thoughts back to the
opening frame. That was when he surrendered a three-run round-tripper to
American League home run leader Gorman Thomas. The blast gave the
Brewers an early4-0 lead.
But the Tigers clawed their way back on the unlikely power of Alan
Trammell and Lou Whitaker, who each hit solo homers. Two more four-
baggers tied the score for the Bengais before Kirk Gibson blooped a double,
scoring Trammell with the go-ahead run.
Morris appeared to be overcoming earlier control trouble after retiring
13 of the final 14 batters before he entered the. fatal ninth inning.. But after
stopping Roy Dowell, Morris gave up a single to Jim Gantner, who'went four
for four. After Thad Bosley was retired on an easy tap back to the mound,
Morris seemed headed for the victory. Then Morris began to dig his grave
when he hit leadoff hitter Paul Molitor.
Reid Sox 5, Indians

McCormick
... 1981-82 status uncertain

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Injury to*
Diemer. puts
a damper
on harriers
prospects
Fuller Fie
By MARK WOLF
Fuller Field in North Campus was of-
ficially renamed yesterday in honor of
Elmer D. Mitchell, in a dedication
ceremony at the North Campus
Recreation Building.
Mitchell represents the motivating
factor behind the University's
renowned Intramural and Recreational
Sports Program, and is known to many
as the nationwide "father of intramural
sports". In addition to being one of its
more famous alumni, Mitchell served
as a professor who eventually became
the chairman of the Department of
Physical Education at Michigan for
several years.
A VARIETY OF speakers con-
tributed to the program, which was
directed by Master of Ceremonies
Professor Rodney J. Grambeau. Some
of the more notable guests at the,
dedication included Mitchell himself,
the honoree's son, Mr. Robert Mitchell,
Intercollegiate Athletic Director Don
Lanham, Wolverine gymnastics coach
Newt Loken, Intramural Sports Direc-
tor Michael Stevenson, Professor
Emeritus Dennis Rigan and Acting
Vice President for University Relations
Dr. Harvey Jacobson.
Grambeau yerbalized the nature of
this unique event as he stated,
"Because of a lifetime spent in
recreation and the contributions he
(Mitchell) made to recreational sports
and the University of Michigan, this
ceremony is both fitting and well
deserved."
The half hour ceremony featured
short speeches from each of the
honored guests. Mitchell's monumental
contributions to Michigan's intramural
and recreational programs were both
noted and commended by individuals
with whom he has worked during the
past fifty years.
Toward the end of the ceremony,
Mitchell was presented with a plaque
which reads, "Elmer, Mitchell Field,
Professor of Physical Education at the
University of Michigan, known as the
father of intramural athletics 1981."

By ANDREW OAKES
One would think that the 1981 Men's Cross Country team is
in an enviable position, with four of its seven varsity perfor-
ners back from last year's Big Ten Co-Championship squad,
which also placed seventh in the NCAA Championships. But
such is not the case this year, however, for no team in the
conference is an odds-on favorite to clinch the title this time
around.
Head Coach Ron Warhurst gives a rundown of the main
competition for the title:
ILLINOIS-Has its entire varsity squad returning.
WISCONSIN-Picked up five excellent recruits.
INDIANA-Always tough, year in, year out.
MINNESOTA- Has the home course advantage for the Big
Ten Championships.
THE LARGEST contributing factor to the Wolverines lack
of confidence towards the season is the unsure status of
returning All-American Brian Diemer, a junior from Grand
Rapids. Diemer suffered a stress fracture of the foot this past
summer. Coach Warhurst is considering having Diemer sit

out the season,
also extending

not wanting to risk incomplete recovery, and
the junior's eligibility another year.

AL East
W L
Detroit ........ 26 18
Boston ......... 26 18
Milwaukee ..... 26 19
Baltimore ...... 24 19
New York...... 22 22
*Toronto ....... 19 21
Cleveland ...... 21 24
Today's games
Milwaukee at Detroit
Cleveland at Boston
Baltimore at New York
.Does not Include last night's game

BOSTON (AP)- Carl Yastrzemski
belted a two-run homer and rookie Rich
Gedman drove in the tie-Breaking run
with his third hit last night as the
Boston Red Sox defeated the Cleveland
Indians-5-4 behind the relief pitching of
' Bob Stanley.
1112 It was Boston's ninth victory in the
4 last 12 games, all at home. '
5 Yastrzemski, winding ' up his 21st
season at the age of 42, got the Red Sox
5% off to a fast start by drilling his seventh
home run of the season and No. 426 of
his career in the first inning. The shot
into the' right field seats moved Yastr
zemski into a tie with Billy Williams for
16th place among baseball's all-time
sluggers.

"Depth is definitely our key to success," states Warhurst,
and this is in fact one area where the squad looks strong. With
returning varsity performers Bill O'Reilly, Gerard
Donakowski, Steve Brandt, Doug Heikkinen, and Dan Beck
all having good training summers, proven performance is
present.
The questionable key that can make or break the
Wolverines, however, are sophomores Jim Schmidt, Glenn
Craze, Mark Wycoff, and Evan Moore.
Two fast freshmen-three-time All-Stater Bill Brady
from Mt. Clemens and hometown harrier Carl Allen, from
Huron High-help beef-up the roster.
All in all, the potential is there to repeat, but it's not going
to come easy. As race-wise fifth year senior Dan Beck
relates, "If everyone continues to work as hard as we have
this week, and if we want a championship bad enough, then
we'll run our tails off to keep it." Basically, that's exactly
what they'll have to do.

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Daily Photo by MIKE LUCAS

MICHIGAN MEN'S gymnastics coach Newt Lokin congratulates Elmer D.
Mitchell yesterday at a formal dedication ceremony which renamed former
Fuller field"in honor of Mitchell.
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