100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

K

Page 6-Friday, September 25, 1981--The Michigan Daily
Students reveal alternatives to
University internship program

w

(Continuedlrom Page 1)
ternship on his own, worked side-by-
side with CPP coordinator Kathleen
Small at the National Republican
Congressional Committee.
Internships through PSIP do not
guarantee pay, but financial aid for ex-
penses incurred for the two-month
duration of the job can be obtained, ac-
cording to Richter.
NINETY-FIVE percent of last year's
interns were not paid by their offices,

the coordinators said, but up to 85 per-
cent of the PSIP participants receive
some financial assistance.
The amount awarded is determined
by the Financial Aid office on the basis
of need. Estimated living costs for the
two-month period are $1300.
Sichel said he would prefer a
program that concentrates on listing
potential internships and distributing
information on how to go about ob-
taining one rather than the structure
PSIP now offers.
A WORKSHOP format open to all in-
terested applicants might provide more
total opportunities for University
students to find internships, Sichel said.
Students need "people to get advice
from but not people to tell them what to
do," he said.
Richter said, however, her program's

first priority was not in numbers, but
PSIP "exists to offer a quality program
for as many students as possible."
Sichel said he finds the program's in-
ternship application process to be
restrictive to students. Finalists mail
all their application materials through
PSIP, and Washington sends all its
responses concerning these ap-
plications to the program first.
The coordinators said this method is
used for purposes of efficiency, but
Sichel said-it "limits (students) in lear-
ning about the job hunting process
because the office does it for (them)."
Although many of the interns com-
plained the cost of housing provided by
the program wa§ high, they said living
together in a George Washington
University dorm aided their adjust-
ment to the new city.

I,

0

Do a Tree a Favor:
Recycle Your Daily

Me and ry shadow Daily Photo by JACKIE BELL
The late afternoon sun casts lingering shadows across a State St. sidewalk.

One acquittal,
one conviction
irk second of
illegal liquor
sales trials

(Continued from Page 1)
chasing liquor.
The police also used underaged Ex-
plorer Scouts in the investigation of
Tice's Party Store. Tice's attorney
Terrence Cavanaugh said that' Ex-
plorer Scout Gary Camelet, 18, entered
the party store at 9;35, five minutes af-
ter the store normally closes. He added
that Tice said Camelet was not
exhibiting the nervousness and usual
characteristics that a minor possesses
when trying to\buy liquor. "Tice knows
all the tricks of the trade," Cavanaugh
said.
TICE MADE a diligent inquiry to

determine Camelet's age before selling
the liquor, the attorney argued.
Last Tuesday, Cavanaugh, Reno and
two other defense attorneys for similar
cases tried to prove that the methods
used by police were entrapment.
Cavanaugh said most of the stores
were checked near closing time when
they were most vunerable. .
Alexander, however, ruled that en-
trapment did not exist in these cases.
Monroe said she accepted the job
because "that's the law" and it "needs
enforcing." She said most of her friends
are against her doing it, but that doesn 't
bother her. "I get hassled for it, but
that's part of it."
Open forum___
debates
'U' therapy

61

FRI-7:10, 9:10
SAT. & SUN- 1:00, 3:00, 5:10,
7:10,9:00
LAST WEEK4I
WINNER
x 1931 ACADEMY AWARD
BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
The
Funniest,
Tenderest
Love
Story I
Of The Year '
DAlY-6:50, 9:30
SAT. & SUN.-1:20, 4:10,
6:50, 9:30

Bt

Pararount PicturEs PrEsEnts A FRANK YABLANS ProductionA Film by FRANK PEPPY
FAYE DUNAWAY ~MOMMIE DEAREST ExEcutivE Producers DAVID KOONTZ and TERENCE ONEILL
BasEd upon thE book by CHRISTINA CRAWFORD -ScrEEnplay by FRAN ABLANS L FRANK PEPPY
and TRACY HOTCHNER and POBEPT GETCHELL- ProducEd by FRANK YABLANS
PG PNRENT[GUAC SUGGESTED rCtEd by FRANK PERPY A Paramount PicturE
C.{yglC ML(X IPear t up :K tnAtlR gh server
I SOME MATERIAL. MAY NOT BE SltRAB.E fOR CHILDREN -
HARRISON EAIRS OF THE 14Y
FORD LOST ARK PG 4
BARGAIN HOURS NOW IN EFFECT 9:30

..

0

'BODY HEAT' IS
A HIT. YOU NOT
ONLY SEE AND
HEAR THIS
MOVIE, YOU CAN
ALMOST FEEL IT'
- (cnr Shabt. Tu ShosNB(T

What hoppened DAILY
to him should 1:15 3:15 5:15
hoppen to you. 7:15 9:15
DAILY -
1:15 3:20
5:301
7:45 10:00
--_-- AID
i 0SAN

program
(Continued from Page 1)
THE PHYSICAL therapy department
is not as high a priority in the medical
school as other parts of the hospital
operation, and should therefore be cut,
said Theodore Cole, chairman of the
Department of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation.
Cole said higher priorities included
an expanded patient population, a
neuromuscular disease tr'eatment cbn
ter, and spinal injury treatment.
Other facilities in Michigan are bet-
ter able to accomplish the goals of a
physical therapy department than the
University of Michigan, argued Mar-
jorie Becker, director of Allied Health
Professions Education and assistant
dean for Allied Health Programs at
University Hospital.
BECKER SAID she was making the
assumption that other facilities in the
state would be able to make up any dif-
ference by opening new training
programs in the event the University
discontinued its physical therapy
program.
DALE FITCH, president of . the
Michigan Physical Therapy
Association, said that the University of
Michigan is the best location for sucha
program and restructuring and moving
the training program would be more
costly than improving the program.
Darnell said he would support discon-
tinuance rather than see the program
deteriorate because of the lack of in-
creased support. The program is
operated jointly by the medical school
and theCollege of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, and has been receiving
less support from both schools, he said.
GRADUATES OF physical therapy
programs across the state are in great
demand, and therefore the program
should not be discontinued, said
Leonard Bender, president of the
Rehabilitation Institute at Wayne State.
University.
Because the University of Michigan
boasts a large medical center, Bender
asserted a physical therapy program is
needed to keep it complete. The
teaching and leadership roles of the
graduates should not be discounted, he
added.
In closing the forum, Frye said that
the University's executive officers
would have to take several different
considerations into account, including
how the University was filling the shor-
tage of physical therapists.

6
0

Mi

h .

/

I!

I

NOVEMBER 4

HILL AUDITORIUM

qr-SHIRT
'p)INTINcj
An rbor's fastest
From 10-800 T-shirts screenprint
* ,thr, O ch-,irs rof order.

Tickets are $11.00, $10.00 and

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan