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September 24, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-24

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Page 2-Thursday, September 24, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Avowed racist sniper
given life sentence

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Convicted
murderer Joseph Paul Franklin was
sentenced to life in prison yesterday by
a 3rd District Court jury which
deliberated his sentence for less than
'21/zhours.
Franklin, 31, an. avowed racist, was'
convicted Saturday of first-degree
murder in the snipe shootings of two
black joggers,
While being held for questioning at
police headquarters in Florence, Ky.,
on Sept. 25, 1980, Franklin had escaped
through a first-floor window when an
officer turned his back briefly.
AS THE COURT in Salt Lake City-
was reconvening after a 10-minute
recess, a bailiff motioned urgently to
plainclothes officiers seated in front of
the press row. After watching several
plainclothes officers summoned from
the room, reporters quickly left the
courtroom, ran downstairs and obser-
veda number of law enforcement of-

ficers scurrying around the outside of
the building.
Finally, sheriff's Lt. Dean Carr con-
firmed that Franklin was missing.
At least two dozen sheriff's deputies
began combing the buildingand the
area at once.
Before the recess, the prosecution
told the 12-member all-white jury that
Franklin does not consider blacks to be
human and showed no remorse for his
victims, Ted Fields, 20, and David
Martin, 18.
The closing argument by Deputy Salt
Lake County Attorney Robert Stott
came afte the prosecution declined to
present any witnesses at a penalty
hearing for Franklin. The defense
presented just one witness, Franklin's
sister.
The two blacks were gunned down
Aug.-20, 1980, by a sniper while jogging
with two white women near Salt Lake
City's Liberty Park.!

The following Major Events con-
certs have been scheduled for
the upcoming season:
Sept. 30- Alice Cooper Nov. 4- Al Jarreau
Oct. 3 - Roger Whittaker Nov. 7 - Black Sabbath
Oct. 3 - Barry Manilow Nov. 8 - Kenny Rogers
Oct. 6 - The Tubes Nov. 18- Chuck Mangione
Oct. 10 - Gordon Lightfoot Nov. 25 - Harry Blackstone
Oct. 11 - Dan Fogelberg Jr. (magician)

Oct. 28- Devo

Nov. 27-ACDC

Concerts for Oct. 19, Nov. 28, Dec. 27 and
28 and Jan. 29 are stil being negotiated.

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Concert promoters
face financial trouble

N BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International renorts
Airlines hit by record slump
seek union wage concessions
NEW YORK (AP)- Some airlines are seeking-and winning-wage con-
cessions and stepped-up productivity promises from their unions as they
struggle to recover from their worst year in history.
But not all have gone as far as Pan American World Airways, Trans World
Airlines and Braniff by actually demanding that workers accept pay cuts
and wage freezes.
The Air Transport Association, a trade group, reported last week that the
controllers' strike and the earlier threat of one, in June, had cost the airlines
$250 million in lost business and had forced as many as 14,000 layoffs. -
Weinberger says $13 billion
in defense cuts 'the maximum'
WASHINGTON (AP)- Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger said
yesterday $13 billion is "the maximum" that can be cut from the military
budget during the next three years without impairing a planned arms
buildup.
Weinberger gave few details in outlining the $13 billion in cuts recommen-
ded by President Reagan and said the administration remains "fully com-
mitted" to upgrading U.S. military might.
He said there has been "no change whatever in the Soviet threat" and
stressed the administration "will work steadily on expanding our
capabilities for deterring or prosecuting a global war wit the Soviet
Union."
He said the administration still plans to improve pay and living standards.
in the services; upgrade training and equipment; insure nuclear parity with
the Soviets; and expand capabilities for deterring or prosecuting a global
war rather than "only short wars in selected theaters."
Warsaw Pact gains edge
in conventional, nuclear forces
LONDON (AP)- The Soviet-led Warsaw Pact has increased its nuclear
missile advantage over NATO in the European theater and the West has
"largely lost" a technological edge in conventional forces, the International
Institute for Strategic Studies said today.
"One cannot necessarily assume from this that NATO could suffer defeat
in war, but one can conclude that there has been sufficient danger in the
trend to require urgent remedies," it said.
The Institute also said in its annual survey of the military capability of
countries around the world that while stocks of existing chemical weapons
are-impossible to assess, the Soviet Union may have considerably more than
the United States.
But in a brief reference to Poland, where the independent union Solidarity
has fueled unrest for a year, the institute said evepts "have underlined the
long-standing uncertainty on whether Soviet planners can count on the
loyalty of all Warsaw Pact members in the event of a European war.
Spy court-martial proceedings
halted in wiretap dispute
ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE, Md. (AP)- The espionage court-martial
of 2nd Lt. Christopher Cooke was halted indefinitely yesterday when Cooke's
lawyers asked the court to suppress evidence apparently obtained through
electronic surveillance of the Soviet embassy in Washington. -
An Air Force spokesman,-Col. John Williams, told reporters that the
defense had entered a motion to suppress evidence that the government had
obtained under authority of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
That law, passed in 1978, authorizes the government to conduct electronic
surveillance of foreign embassies. Several of the charges against Cooke in-
volve telephone calls he allegedly made to the Soviet embassy and failed to
report to his superior officers.

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S
S

SING A SONG!
with the U-M
WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB
Positions still available
for fall
Ca//665-7408

(Continued from Page 1) '
THE JAZZ promoter received a
$1,500 grant from the Michigan Council
for the Arts this season, as opposed to
last year's federal and state grants of
$9,6000. The remainder of its funds
come from ticket sales. If not for last
year's grant, director Dehn said, Eclip-
se would have lost money.
Other concerts scheduled this
season-in addition to the James
benefit-include Betty Carter on Nov. 6
and Dave Brubeck on Dec. 15.,
Part of the reason Eclipse is eligible for
federal and state arts grants is that it
sponsors jam sessions and workshops'

to help young players develop. These
sessions are scheduled at various times
throughout the year.
Prime Production owners Tom
Stachler and Lee Berry said it is still
too early to forecast success this year.
Both agree they are in a "risky"
business. What Prism tries to do, ex-
plained Stachler and Berry, is to bring
in musical acts considered up-and-
coming as opposed to "mainstream"
groups booked by Major Events.,
The Prism owners said their em-
phasis now is on making a name for
themselves and building a reputation
for their promotion company.

Road work may slow
N. Campus bus route

Intereted ine Israel?
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UNION Of STUDENTS FOR ISRAEL
For more information, call663-3336

(Continued from Page 1)
to use the same route when half of the
new Fuller Road construction begins
sometime in January or February.
NEXT SUMMER, the Fuller-Glen
corridor will be closed and buses will
travel the hospital access road, curren-
tly being built by the University, across
Nichols Bridge and-onto the finished
section of Fuller.
The road project, which is targeted
for completion by November, 1982, was
accelerated to facilitate the hospital
construction, Chizek said. Chizek and
city engineers stressed that the com-
pletion date is "optimistic."
University hospital planners and city
engineers have been coordinating their
sewer, utilities, and road construction
plans in order to save money andbuild
more efficiently, Rasche said.
THE UNIVERSITY and the city are
each paying 10 percent of the projected
$7 million cost of the new road, with the
rest of the tab covered by federal funds,
Chizek said.
Once the construction dust has
cleared, students will find the Fuller-
Glen-University Hospital area
dramatically changed:
" Glen Ave. will become a one-way

street between Catherine and Huron,
with Washtenaw Place serving as a
one-way northbound access.
" With a new Fuller bridge, North Cam-
pus buses will no longer have to cross
the bridge one bus at a time.
" The left turn from Fuller onto Glen
will be eliminated.
" The Wall St. and Fuller intersection'.
will be smoothed out, with one bridge
donnecting to Maiden Lane and another
biidge leading to the new hospital.
" Fuller will become a divided, four-
lane road between Wall St. and the
Huron River.
" A center left-turn lane will be added to
Huron St. between Glen and
Washtenaw.
LANDSyAPE 'architecture Prof.
Peter Pollack, whose firm will be lan-
dscaping the project, said the historic
stone wall along Fuller and Wall Streets
will be saved and rebuilt near the
original site.
Construction will also include a
bicycle path, 10-foot sidewalks, and a
proposed walkway/bicycle path
through Fuller Park. The bridge will
provide pedestrian access to the new
hospital.
The Fuller-Glen project is the result
of over a decade of environmental im-
pact studies and community input,
Pollack said. The original plan called'
for a huge concrete wall between the
hospital site and Fuller Park, and the
road would have sliced the park in two,
Pollack said.

i
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Vol. XCII, No. 13
Thursday, September 24, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through, April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Doily is a member of the=Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.

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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S IM T W T F'S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 117121314 6 8 9 101112
13 1516 17 18 19 11 t 1314 15 16 17 15 t 1718 19 20 21
20 12223 24 25 26 1842021 22 23 24 22 24 25 06-a';9,28
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

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