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September 22, 1981 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-22

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 22, 1981-Page 5

Panel suggests hostage

WASHINTON (AP) - A presidential
commission recommended yesterday
that the Americans held hostage in Iran
be paid $12.50 for each day of the 444-
day ordeal.
If approved by Congress, the
proposed tax-free benefit would total
about $5,550 for each of 51 hostages who
were released last January. Hostages
freed earlier also would receive $12.50
per day of captivity. The benefits are in
addition to regular salaries.
THE NINE-MEMBER panel also
suggested the government pay for
treatment, without time limit, of any
emotional or physical problem the
hostages may be suffering from as a
result of their confinement.
The benefits would not apply to Jerry
Plotkin, a California businessman who
was among the 52 hostages released in
January. The commission decided that
the U.S. government has no legal
responsibility to provide benefits for
private citizens, noting that warnings
against travel to Iran had been issued
before the hostage taking.
An attorney for the hostages and their
families, Brice Claggett, had told the

'There is no way the hostages and their
families can be compensated for the 14
months of hell they went through.'
-Louisa Kennedy,
wife offormer hostage

commission that $1,000 per day com-
pensation for each hostage would be on
the"conservative side" in light of the
suffering they endured.
BUT RETIRED Army Col. Charles
Scott, one of the 52 hostages freed in
January, said: "I've come out publicly
before and said I didn't feel the U.S.
government owed us a thing. I still feel
that way." He added Iran should be
"held responsible for any reparations
we are due."
Louisa Kennedy, wife of former
hostage Morehead Kennedy, said in a
telephone interview the commission
was "dealing in symbolism" and the
$12.50 per day recommendation was a
"good symbolic figure."
"There is no way the hostages and

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FEAR?
Your life can

their families can be compensated for
the 14 months of hell they went
through," she added.
AS FAR AS she is concerned, the
American - people already have
provided compensation.
"The country cared. And the country
was as deeply involved as we were. I
can't think of more wonderful compen-
sation than that," she said.
Dorothea Morefield, wife of former
hostage Richard Morefield, said that as
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a "token payment, I think it's quite ac-
ceptable." But, she added, she would
rather have the money come from Iran
than from the American taxpayer.
JOHN COALE, a lawyer who?
represents 13 former hostages, called
the commission's recommendation
"ridiculous" and a "joke." The former
captives "probably could have got that
much on welfare," Coale said in a
telephone interview.
He contrasted the $12.50 per day
recommendation with the $192 per diem
the nine commission members
received. Panel members included
former Secretary of Sate Cyrus Vance
and former Health and Human Services
Secretary Patricia Harris.
As the basis for its per diem figure,
the commission cited the $5 per day
benefits paid to Vietnam prisoners of,
war. The $12.50 figure for the former
hostages was arrived at by taking int
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Raquel Martinez acknowledges the applause of her fans Sunday in a down-
town Tijuana bullring, after graduating to full matador after 10 years of
fights as an apprentice. The American mother is the first woman to achieve
jsuch status in a major bullring.
Duarte tells Reagan
little hope for eace

change..
TODAY!

0

DENNIS DARVILLE

WASHINGTON (AP) - El
Salvador's President Jose Napoleon
Duarte briefed President Reagan
yesterday about the ongoing strife in
his Carribean nation, claiming there is
little or no hope for a negotiated peace
between his regime and rebel forces.
But a high U.S. official specifically
citing the initiative by Mexican
*resident Jose Lopez Portillo, said the
United States would support an effort,
by "any friendly force" in Latin
America to mediate the strife in El
Salvador.
REAGAN AN4D Duarte, accompanied
byaides, conferred for 20 minutes in the
Ovabfhiie&Duarte also met privately
with Vice President GeoireBush.
Duarte insisted he did not ask Reagan
for additional military and financial
aid, but the senior American official,
who asked not to be named, said the

Salvadoran president noted, "We do
have economic and military
problems."
Mexico and France have jointly
called for negotiations between the El
Salvador government and leftist in-
surgents. As recently as last week U.S.
officials declared they "didn't consider
this to be helpful."
But Lopez Portillo and Reagan repor-
tedly narrowed their policy differences
over El Salvador during their meeting
late last week in Grand Rapids, Mich.
On that score, the U.S. official said
yesterday that "the president is quite
generally interested in utilizing the
good offices of any friendly force in
Latin America. To the extent that a
mediating effort could be introduced
either by President Lopez Portillo or
anyone else, we think this would be
beneficial."

Dennis is a man whose life was changed when he
learned how to overcome fear. Now he's telling
others how they can do it, too.
" Graduate of Mississippi State University
" Popular speaker on University campuses throughout the.U.S.

Sunday, Sept. 20
Monday, Sept. 21
Tuesday, Sept. 22

Angell Hall
Room 229
7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by Maranatha

Military plane crash

kills

7,

injures 31

INDIAN SPRINGS AIR FORCE
BASE, Nev. (UPI) - An Air Force'
.cargo plane taking part in night war
games crashed and exploded in flames
in-the Nevada desert yesterday, killing
seven men and injuring 61 others.
Smoke grenades, flares and possibly
fuettanks caught fire on impact, setting
of a series of smaller explosions that
rattled windows in the- quiet desert
community of Indian Springs.
In Washington, White House Deputy
*Press Secretary Larry Speakes told
reporters President Reagan "ex-
pressed his regret over the loss of life."
THE AIR SMELLED of sulfur and
smoke from the smoldering wreckage
seven hours after the 3:20 a.m. EDT
crash. Nevada Highway Patrolmen and

military police blocked reporters and
curious motorists from driving off
nearby U.S. 95 and used bullhorns to
keep them moving.
The crash site was 200 yards off the
highway, the main artery linking Las
Vegas with central and northern
Nevada cities. The green tail section of
the C-130 transport, visible from the
highway, was silhouetted against the
sky like a shark's fin.
A team of 40 to 45 military in-
vestigators arrived at the scene after
dawn and fanned out into the desert to
gather clues as to the cause of the ac-
cident.
Air Force Col. Mike Wallace said the
bodies of seven victims were
recovered. It was believed most.of the
dead were burn victims.

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