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September 22, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-22

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Page 2-Tuesday, September 22, 1981-The Michigan Daily

I

Frye tells'
faculty
of possible
-. r
reductions
(Continued from Page 2)
adequate salary program," Frye said.
"We would have to ask the Regents for
a 21 to 22 percent tuition increase for a 7
to 8 percent salary program."
Frye said that the administration
would not willingly press for tuition in-.
creases that were higher than the rate
of inflation, but that such tuition hikes
may be necessary.
. Frye also announced that the Univer-
ity will soon begin a major fund
raising campaign.
Help Prevent
Birth Defects -
The Nation's
Number One
Child Health
Problem.
Support the
Mamchof
~)Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS
FOUNDATION
This space contributed
by the publisher.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Haig assails Russia at UN
UNITED NATIONS- Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig told the
United Nations yesterday that the Soviet Union and Vietnam are threatening
all sovereign nations and the U.N. itself by their intervention in Afghanistan
and Cambodia.
Haig also unveiled a new Reagan administration strategy for promoting
economic development of poor nations-a plan that puts greater emphasis
on private investment and less on government aid.
With Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko in the audience, Haig had
harsh words for the Soviet Union-which could set the stage for a cool con-
frontation when he meets with the Soviet leader here Wednesday.
"One of the great dangers to the U.N. charter today and to development it-
self is the willful violation of the national integrity of both Afghanistan and
Cambodia by the Soviet Union and Vietnam," Haig said in his first speech to
the General Assembly. "Their behavior challenges the basic rights of all
sovereign states."
He said he hoped the day would never come when the world accepts the
idea that "might makes right."
Iran executes another 45
ANKARA, Turkey- Iran's Islamic regime said yesterday firing squads
executed 45 more opponents, bringing to at least 192 the number of people
put to death in a two-day bloody purge of dissidents.
The report of the latest executions, including that of the son of an
ayatollah, came as Iranian troops shouting "Death to America" marched
through the streets of Tehran to mark the first anniversary of the war with
Iraq.
More than 1,000 people opposed to Ayatollah Ruhollah Knomeini's rule are
believed to have been put to death in Iran in the last three months.
The death sentences were carried out a day after at least 147 other op-
ponents were put to death at the prison and in other parts of the country.
Belgian government resigns
BRUSSELS, Belgium- Premier Mark Eyskens submitted his gover-
nment's resignation to King Baudouin yesterday after the center-left
coalition broke over aid to the steel industry.
A brief statement from the royal palace said, "The king has accepted this
resignation."
It also said the king asked Eyekens, a Dutch-speaking Christian
Democrat, to stay on as caretaker premier.
The Eyskens government-Belgium's 31st since World WarII-is made up
of Christian Democrats and Socialists divided into Dutch- and French-
speaking factions.
Eyskens' 5 months in office were marked by continuous disagreements
within the Cabinet, mostly over economic issues.
Judge overturns rugby ban
ALBANY, N.Y.- A federal judge yesterday overturned an order by New
York officials canceling a rugby game featuring the South African
Springboks team that has sparked protests because of its country's policy of
racial separation.
Lawyers for the state said they would ask the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals for a stay of the ruling before today's match in Albany. The team's
only other U.S. match, played in Wisconsin on Saturday, drew opposition by
civil rights activists.
U.S. District Judge Howard Munson also refused a request by state attor-
neys to grant a stay of his ruling. "If I granted a stay at this time, it would be
just like ruling in favor of the state," he said.
Gov. Hugh Carey last week cited "imminent danger of rioting" in warning
Albany officials that he could not guarantee the safety of participants and
instructing that the match be called off.

*

101

AP Photo
Marine marriage
Married yesterday in the dolphin tank of Marine World, a tourist attraction in Daytona Beach Florida, Robert Heck and
Gimme Brown exchange vows here in a most unusual manner. The newlyweds, a pair of diving enthusiasts from West
Point, Pa., hoped their underwater vows would earn them a place in the Guiness Book of World Records. Clad in a
diving helmet, the Rev. Hal Marchman performed his first underwater ceremonies.

LS&A SCHOLARSHIP
LSA Scholarship applications for Winter 1982 will be
available In 1221 Angell Hall beginning Sept. 18, 1981.
To qualify for scholarship consideration, a student must be
an LSA undergraduate and have completed one full term in
LSA. Sophomores must have a U of M grade point of 3.7 or
better and Juniors and Seniors must have a GPA of at least
3.6. The awards are based on financial need and on academic
merit. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED TO
1221 ANGELL HALL BY OCTOBER 16.

Soviet impatience
with Solidarity grows

From AP and UPI
MOSCOW - The official Soviet news
agency charged yesterday that
Poland's independent labor union
Solidarity is setting up "acute conflict
situations" aimed at overthrowing the
nation's social system.
It said Solidarity is preparing to seize

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COURSES IN ADULT EDUCATION

ADULT DANCE DIVISION:
CLASS INSTRUCTOR DAY TI
Intermed. Modern S. Matheke M, W 6:00-7
Beginning Jazz J. Krzyminski T, Th 6:00-7
Beginning Ballet C. Flynn T, Th 7:45-9
Intermed. Ballet C. Flynn T, Th 6:00-7:
PREPARATORY DANCE DIVISION
Beginning Ballet C. Flynn T, F 4:30-5
(Ages 8-12)
Intermed. Ballet C. Flynn Th, 4:30-5
(Ages 8-12) Sat. 9:00-10
All classes are held in DANCE BUILDING STUDIOS, and all
begin the week of September 28th. To register:
(1) Come to the Extension Service Building at 412 Maynard St.
(2) Send in a mail registration form from our FREE CATALOG
(3) Call 313/763-4321 if you have Visa or MasterCard
CLASSES WITHOUT SUFFICIENT REGISTRATION BY SATURDAY, OCTOBER
3rd WILL BE CANCELLEDI Normal business hours for the University of Michigan
Courses in Adult Education are from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon.-Fri. For additional
information on these or any of our other fine classes call 313/763-4321.

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"I APPLIED MYSELF AND GOT
FEDERAL STUDY MONEY:'
-Robin Clark
"My parents help pay my college tuition, and I also work part-time. But
last year I realized I might not have enough money to continue my education.
"Then I found out about the Middle Income Student Assistance Act.
It provides more aid than ever before for education after high school.
"I applied and found out that I was eligible for a Basic Educational Oppor-
tunity Grant (BEOG). You should also apply to see if you qualify for BEOG
or one of the other programs available to almost all
students enrolled in colleges or technical schools.
"If you'd like to get more education and
need study money, do what I did. Write to
Box 84, Washington, D.C. 20044 and ask
for a free booklet. It's called "A Student
Consumer's Guide to Six Federal Finan-
cial Aid Programs:" Then get in touch
with the counselor or financial aid admin-
a istrator in the school of your choice for
help in applying. (And be sure to com-
plete the forms carefully so you will be
eligible for the help you need!) '.
"Remember: If you want education
after high school and need financial
assistance to get it, "IT'S TIME TO
APPLY YOURSELF."
W \°

power and is confident tl at the Polish
government "cannot offer serious
resistance."
The Tass rep6rt from Warsaw was
the latest sign of Soviet impatience
with Polish authorities. The Kremlin
urged the Polish government in a blunt
message published last week to take
"prompt and resolute" steps to curb
what it called anti-Soviet activity by
Solidarity.
THE NEWS AGENCY also
distributed a letter from a group of
Soviet workers offering their help to
"rebuff the enemies of socialism." And
senior Tass commentator Yuri- Kor-
nilow denounced what he called "crude
and shameless interference" in Polish
affairs by Western countries.
The Tass report yesterday said
Solidarity has "opted for a confron-
tation with ,Socialist Poland" because
they believe "the authorities cannot of-
fer serious resistance to such counter-
revolutionary plans of the trade union
association."
Tass expressed no opinion about
whether the Polish government would
eventually offer the necessary "serious
resistance."
ECHOING Soviet charges in a further
hardening of the government's positon,
Poland's chief labor negotiator, Deputy
Premier Mieczyslaw Rakowski, said
Solidarity was now struggling against
Communist rule.
Rakowski spoke after the official
Communist Party newspaper Trybuna
Ludu said the party wants to find a
political solution to the nation's
deepening economic and social crisis
but that there were limits to any set-
tlement.
In an interview with the official PAP
nes agency, Rakowski said the party
would try to form an expanded coalition
with unions and social and religious
groups in Poland, but that Solidarity
would not be included.
SOLIDARITY scheduled a meeting,
for today in Warsaw to discuss the
latest Soviet warnings. Two local chap-
ters of Solidarity accused the Soviet
Union of interfering in Poland's inter-
nal affairs.
A letter to Polish workers from em-
ployees of Moscow's Hammer and
Sickle Steel Plant said, "In the rebuff to
the enemies of socialism, as in labor,
you can always count on our help and
all-round support."
The workers, in the letter distributed
by Tass, did not say precisely how they
or other Soviet citizens planned to help
resist the so-called enemies of
socialism.
The Kremlin and its Warsaw Pact
allies sent troops to Czechoslovakia in
1968 and to Hungary in 1956 to stop what
Moscow viewed as counter-
revolutionary activities in those coun-
tries.
SCMOLARSHIPS- GRANTS- LOANS
$3 Billon Com uter Data
Bank Available

7e £irbigan Bailg
Vol. XCII, No. 11
Tuesday, September 22, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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Editor in chief....................SARA ANSPACH
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News Editor...................... DAVID MEYER
Opini'on Page 'Editors............ :... KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Chief Photographer .............. PAUL ENGSTROM
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ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen, Jonathan
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le

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SMTWTFS S MMTTWWT F S SMTWTFS S M T W T FS
rEPTEBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER} DECEMBER
-6 123 33 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10f112 4 6 7 89 10 8 101112 13 14 6 89 101it 12
'F ' f8't9" ' ?' '4 15' l ' 1 ' l' f' 19 20 21
20±2223242526 18 20 2J 22 23 24 22,_24_25_ _6-__ __25_6_27-28_29_30_31
27 2930o 256 27 28 29 30 31a-9 ________
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
SMTWTFS S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
-- 2+345623456123

11

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