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September 20, 1981 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-20

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COLONIAL LANES I
IWELCOMES KI
FLIPPER McGEE 'I
This coupon good for 56C free video games or 259 off
a game of bowling with Student I.D.
COLONIAL LANES'
1950S. Industrial
40 bowling lanes, billiards, and video arcade
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STUDENT LEGAL SER VICES'
NOARD OF DIRECTORS
Thrertuent Member Oenng
Oponings include:
One member Fall 1981-April 1982
Two members Fail 1981-April 1983
Deadline for Student Legal Services application
is Monday:, September 21,1981
Applications and Committee descriptions
available at MSA
3009 Michigan Union-763-3242

Page 2-Sunday, September 20, 1981-The Michigan Daily
'Sodarity Day'
protest draws
260,OOO

WASHINGTON (AP) - Wearing
hardhats and union jackets, more than
a quarter of a million people hoisted
protest banners with sight of the White
House yesterday to proclaim their
disgust with federal budget cuts and
characterize the Reagan administraton
as "cold-hearted" and "callous.''
The AFL-CIO borrowed from the
Polish union movement and called its
rank-and-file protest "Solidarity Day."
PRESIDENT REAGAN, spending
the weekend 65 miles away at Camp
(Amateur and
Commercial Photofinishing)

MSA Internal and External
Comm ittee Openings

EXTERNAL COMMITTEES
Advisory Committee on Academic
Affairs
Student Relations Committee
Advisory Committee on
Recreational Sports
Privacy Committee
Residency Appeals Committee
University Council
Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics
Library Council
Review Panel for Classified Research
Publications Board
Honorary Degrees
Civil Liberties Board
Research Policies Committee
Comp'uter Facilities
University Relations
U-Cellar Board
State Relations
Student Legal Services
Program Evaluation
Office of Student Services
Policy Board
University Budget Priorities
R.O.T.C. Board
Advisory Committee on
Affirmative Action

INTERNAL COMMITTEES
Academic Affairs
Budget Priorities Committee
Communications Committee
S.O.B. (Student Organizations Board)
Legislative Relations
Minority Affairs
Permanent Interviewing
Special Projects.
International Students
Maize
Insurance Committee
Course Evaluations
C.S.J. (Central Student Judiciary)
Course Encounters

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On the Hour 10 to 3
Weekdays at
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David, Md., received telephone reports
on the demonstration.
"The president recognizes and ap-
preciates the frustration that comes
because there are no instant miracles
and he also appreciates that the
medicine is hardly sweet," said White
House spokesman David Gergen, ad-
ding that Reagan believes that "the
true enemy of working men and women
is a sick economy."
Addressing the huge throng, labor
federation president Lane Kirkland
referred to Reagan's contention that
labor leaders are out of touch with the
rank and file and said, "We are out of
step with none but the cold hearted, the
callous, the avaricious and the indif-
ferent."
U.S. PARK POLICE estimated the
crowd at about 260,000.
The AFL-CIO abandoned its
traditional disdain of mass protest in
hopes of impressing President Reagan
and his congressional, allies with the
depth of opposition to his domestic
policies.
Though Reagan had defeated labor
and its allies in every budget battle in
Congress, Kirkland said, "The winter's
chill is approaching and the bloom is
fading from fall's mandates."
THERE WERE FEW pinstripe
suits-the wardrobe of labor lob-
byists-on the west front of the Capitol.
Unionists marched side-by-side with
civil rights and feminist activists.
It was a protest without politicians.
The march and rally had the support of
the Democratic National Committee,
but pols were invited to listen to the
speeches, not make them.
Earlier, the Reagan administration
dismissed the demonstration as "par-
tisan." The president has vowed to con-
tinue slashing the federal budget and
labeled critics of his program "Chicken
Littles."
At the head of the massive crowd that
marched from the Washington
Monument to the Capitol were
Kirkland, BenjamineHooks, executive
director of the NAACP, Eleanor Smeal,
president of the National Organization
for Women, and Coretta King, widow of
Dr. Martin Luther King, J.
Jerry Wurf, president of the
American Federation of State, County
'and Municipal Employees, said, "In
spite of this turnout, there's no guaran-
tee that our task will succeed. This is
the beginning of a long, difficult,
frustrating process to turn the country
around."
Poetry Reading
with
JOHN BECK and
DANNY RENDLEMANN
reading from their works
Mon. Sept. 21 -8:00 p.m.
GUILD HOUSE -802 Monroe
PIANO
DROPOUTS
Baltic Class.
HOW TO PLAY THE PIANO
DESPITE YEARS OF LESSONS
Two years of testing have pro-
duced a new course in making music.
This course is based on an amazing
breakthrough in piano instruc-
tion, and it is intended for people
who can at least read and play a
simple melody line of notes.
This new technique teaches you to
unlock your natural ability to make
music. You will learn how to take any
melody and play it a variety of ways:
rock, folk, swing, jazz, semi-classi-
cal, bolero . . . you name it .
just for the sheer joy of it! By the end
of this 8-lesson course, you will know

how to arrange and enrich a song so
that you won't need sheet music or
meporization. How well you play
depends upon how much you prac-
tice, of course.
Come and experience this revolu-
tionry new way of bringing adults
back to the piano.
FREE DEMONSTRATION
Monday, Sept. 28, 1981
from 7-8 p.m. In Room 2038 School
of Music Building on the North
Campus of the University of Mich-
igan. FO ME
FORMER*
PIANO
DROPOUTS
Continuation Class'
for those who have completed the
basic class and want a "refresher"
course to review techniques, assess.
progress and learn new concepts.
While working with elements of im-

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Unpublished Beatles song
may be released next year
LONDON- After some 20 years under lock and key, the only complete
Beatles recording never put on sale may be released sometime next year,
the Daily Mirror reported yesterday.
The tabloid newspaper said the song, "Please Leave My Kitten Alone,"
was recorded in the early 1960s but "rejected when the Beatles put together
their album 'Please Please Me."'
Since then, the paper said, the recording has been locked up at EMI
Records in London.
The Mirror said the record company planned to release the song last year,
but shelved the idea when former Be tle John Lennon was shot to death in
New York City.
No spokesman at EMI was available to comment on the report. However,
the newspaper quoted an unidentified company official as saying: "Ob-
viously we would not have released the record at such a time. It would have
been totally inappropriate.
"There is other unfinished recorded material of the Beatles which has
never been released, but 'Kitten' is the only complete track," the official was
quoted as saying.
Poland church supports union
fight for press freedom
WARSAW, Poland- Poland's Roman Catholic bishops, in a pastoral letter
to be read from church pulpits today, called limiting freedom of speech
"inadmissible" and said monopolizing the mass media was "unacceptable."
Meanwhile, Solidarity and Poland's commuffist government observed an
undeclared truce in their war of words, but the Kremlin escalated its attack
and indicated Soviet military intervention might be near.
The bishop's statement was made available last night and appeared to en-
dorse the strivings of Solidarity, Poland's giant independent union, for ac-
cess to the media, a sore point with the government here and the Soviets.
Ca. anti-nuke protesters
plan renewed assault
SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif.- Protesters at the gates of the Diablo Canyon
nuclear plant, their ranks depleted by more than 1,000 arrests, regrouped
yesterday for a renewed assault one sheriff said would be "a bigone.'
Tony Metcalf of the Abalone Alliance said the hundreds of anti-nuclear
blockaders withdrew to their tent city on nearby private land "to prepare for
a strong presence on Monday."
Across the street, the power plant's main gate was free of protesters for
the first time in five days.
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is expected to vote Monday on a
request from Pacific Gas & Electric Co. for an interim license to load fuel,
stat one of the twin reactors and conduct a series of low power tests.
Prosecutor vows to crack down
on Iranian leftist guerrillas
BEIRUT, Lebanon- Leftist guerrillas captured in Iran will be tried and
sentenced "on the spot" to save on jail costs and revolutionary guards who
hesitate to carry out the order will be reprimanded, Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini's new prosecutor says.
Meanwhile, five Khomeini disciples were declared "competent" to run for
president Oct. 2. The front-runner was considered Ali Khamenei, head of the
ruling Islamic Republican Party. The others were three Cabinet ministers
and a former deputy interior minister.
The announcement on summary trials was made Friday night by
Prosecutor Musavi Tabrizi, successor to the assassinated Hojatoleslam Ali
Qodussi. "I announce that security officers must stand up to these people
(Mujahedeen Khalq guerrillas) most decisively," Tabrizi said on Tehran
Radio.
Vol. XCII, No. 10
Sunday, September 20, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, .Michigan 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
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News room: (313) 764-0552, 76DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation, 764-0558, Classified advertising

764-0557,Display advertising,.764.0554,Billing 764-0550.

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Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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Editor-in-chief....................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor...............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................... Lorenzo Benet
News Editor...................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors..............KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Chief Photographer.............'. PAUL ENGSTROM
Sports Editor...................MARK MIHANOVIC
Executive Sports Editors ...........GREG DEGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen, Jonathan
Stewart.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim, Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Brian Masck.
MAGAZINE/ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee, Pam Kramer. Gail Negbour, Howard
Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Doug Brice,
Crot Chaltron, Andrew Chapman,'Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger, Maureen
Fleming, Denise Franklin, Joyce Frieden, Mark Gin-
din, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover, Jennifer
Miller. Don Oberrotmn, Janet Rae, David Spok, Fan-
nie Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Jodi Bitt-
ker, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,. Don Conlin, Mar-
tha Crall, Jim Dwormon, John Fitzpatrick, Thomas
Fous, Larry Freed, Alan Goldstein, Chuck Hartwig,
Chuck Jaffe, John Kerr, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman,
Ron Pollock, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schoumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent,Walley, Chris
Wilson. Bob Wonowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager ............ .... RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager................BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager............. SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager..............DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ...............MICHAEL YORICK
Circulation Manager ................. KIM WOODS
Assistant Display Manager.........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager ............... SUE RABUSHKA
Sales Coordinator...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF-Ljz Altman, Meg Armbruster, Joe
Broda, Norm Christiansen, Alexander DePillis, Aida
Esenstat, Wendy Fox, Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hen-
drick, Anthony Interrante, Indre Luitkus, Mary Ann
Noonan, Michael Savitt, Karen Silverstein Sam
Slaughter. Adrienne Strmbi, Nancy Thompson.
Jeffrey Voight.

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER S OCTOBER NOVEMBER OECEMSER
S MT W TF SSM T W TFS SM TW T FS SM TW TF S
2123 1 3456-7 12345
1011t12 4 6 78 910 8 101f12 1314 6 8 9 10 1112
13 1516 17 18 19 111t 1314 151617 15 1718 192027
2 23 24 25 26 18 20212223 2 24 25
27 2930 X25 6 27 28 2930 31t ________ ______
1982

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