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September 19, 1981 - Image 26

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Page 2-Saurday, September 19, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Ford museum dedication'Grand',

IN BRIEF

By PAMELA KRAMER
Special to the Daily
GRAND RAPIDS -A few months ago,,
it was fashionable in certain cyncial
circles of Grand Rapids to joke that the
Gerald Ford presidential museum had
only three walls because "they just
couldn't find enough memorabilia to fill
four."
Well, not much of that spirit was.
evident-even among the cynics--at
yesterday's dedication ihe museum
and related festivities.
THE DEDICATION-featuring
speeches from such dignitaries as for-
mer French President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing, Canadian Prime Minister
Pierre Trudeau, Speaker of the House
Thomas "Tip" O"neil, 'President
Reagan, Secretary of State Alexander
Haig and Vice President George
Bush-offered nothing but praise of
Ford's accomplishments as 38th
president of the United States, and hope
for the future.
"The first time he and I encountered
each other it was in Michigan," Reagan.
told the crowd, estimated at 100,000. "I
was a young sports announcer for WHO
in Iowa, and he was the center of the
Michigan death team. Well, I won't lie.
That was about 47 years ago, and
Michigan won."
"Since then," Reagan went on, "Ford'
has said that both played football, but
he played for Michigan, and I played
for-Warner Brothers."
AT THE DEDICATION, the
president echoed the praise offered by
preceeding spehkers, referring to Ford
as a "healer." Both he and Ford, he
Reagan
WASHINGTON (AP) - Government
sources said ysterday that President
Reagan intends to propose abolishing
the Bureau of Alchol, Tobacco, and
Firearms as part of his next round of
bipdget cuts. The administration also
considered but rejected, abolition of the
Consumer Product Safety Commission.
In addition, sources who asked not to
be identified by name said the presidnt
is likely to recommend sharp -cutbacks
in federal loans and loan guarantees
when he unveils his budget-cutting
package next week. Such a move is
designed to diminish the federal
presence in the credit market and
hopefully lead to a'decline in interest
rates, officials said.
REAGAN ALSO is expected to an-
nounce plans for a future revision in

said, entered the Oval Office at a time
of low' national morale and poor
economic conditions. Ford "helped you
to believe in ourselves again, 'Reagan
said, adding that he hopes to do the
same.
For the most part, however, politics
played a relatively small role in the
museum's dedication-surprisingly
small considering the guests who at-
tended the affair.
Heads in Grand.Rapids will be spin-
ning for quite some time as a result of,
the weeklong celebration.
"I COULDN'T believe all the
celebrities," said Diana Walma, 17, a
resident of nearby Byron Center. "I
liked watching all the limos, and I'm
proud of Ford. But I'm also proud of
Grand Rapids for putting it all together.
I was surprised," she said.
A lot of people were surprised. Hun-
dreds crowded around the doors of the
newly opened Grand Plaza Hotel,
where most of the guests were staying,
hoping to catch a glimpse.
Even inside, with entrance by in-
vitation only,;there were semi-stifled
squeals of "My God, it's Trudeau!" and
"Bob Hope. I can't believe it! Bob Hope
and theref he's going to talk to Danny
Thomas."
THE $1,000-A-SEAT Hope show (to be
aired on NBC in October) drew mixed
reactons -from those who saw it. Aside
from the retakes-there were quite a
few-the program was well-staged.
The Wolverine marching band got
things rolling, bringing the house to its
feet for "Hail to the Victors." And the

show was, after all, in honor of Grand
Rapids' own Jerry-even if there was
quite a bit of ribing at the 38th
president.
"He knew he was going to be presid-
ent while he was playing footbal for
Michigan," Hope told the audience.
"One of his teammates said it took an
act of Congress to get him to make a
tackle."
CHEVY CHASE-well-known for his
impersonation of "Ford the
Bungler"-wasnt invited, but he might
just as well have been. Between Hopes.
jokes about every one present ("I was
relieved when Bush arrived, because
Haig and Tip were fighting-about who's
in charge here.") Mark Russell's own
brand of political satire (one of his
milder bits was the three-sided
museum line), and everyone's jab at
the danger of Ford on a golf course, the
show could easily have been a roast.
But "don't worry," Hope told the
audience "A lot of these won't make it
on the air."
The All-American City had been
gearing up all week for yesterday's
finale with ethnic festivals and other
special events. And the Secret Service
has been there, keeping an eye on
things. "We've had Secret Service up to
out teeth,"maid the owner of a hot dog
stand a block away from the Grand
Plaza. "Nobody could've gotten away
with anything. And the press. All the
networks, Larry King, Good Morning,
and the Today Show. It's been some
week."
In addition to theFord Museum

Ford and Reagan
... celebrating presidencies
dedication, there were the well-timed
dedications of a new art museum, and
the Grand Plaza Hotel and entertain-
ment center estravaganza that plan-
ners say they hope are the beginnings of
a renaissance in Grand Rapids.
"Ford's an OK Guy," according to
Grand Rapids' Junior College
sophomore Greg Wilterdink. "He put us
on the map."~
As Grand Rapids' mayor Abe Drasin
told the crowd at the dediction, "This
city has done a lot to help shape Gerald
Ford, and he has done a lot for us."
Climbing on the elevator at his hotel,
after all the activities, Ford said he
wanted simply to, "Kick my shoes off,
and put up my feet. I'm tired."

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Polish students hijack plane
BERLIN- Twelve Polish students armed with firebombs and razor
blades hijacked a Polish airliner yesterday and flew to a U.S. Air Force base
in West Berlin, pursued by a Soviet jet fighter that was forced away by two
American helicopters.
The hijackers, nine men and three women described as students ranging
in age from 17 to 22, were turned over to West Berlin authorities for possible
prosecution.
Police said one woman among the 37 other passengers and crew was in-
jured slightly when-one of the hijackers held a razor blade to her neck to for-
ce the pilot to fly to West Berlin.
The other passengers aboard twin-engine Polish LOT airliner, includigg
one American who was not identified, were not harmed.
Egyptian police beat, arrest
protesters outside mosque
CAIRO, Egypt- Flailing away with whips and fists, plainclothes police
beat and arrested dozens of Moslem demonstrators who gathered outside a
Cairo mosque yesterday to protest President Anwar Sadat's arrest of
religious leaders accused of forrnenting sectarian strife.
The demonstrators, many of them with bloodied faces, bruises and red
swollen eyes, were herded into police vans and driven off.
The plainclothes officers were backed up by more than a dozen truckloads
of khaki-uniformed police armed with sticks, tear gas and automatic rifles.
It was the second Friday Moslem sabbath in a row that demonstrators
have gathered outside the mosque in Cairo's eastern suburb of Koubbeh to
protest the arrest of a number of Moslem prayer leaders earlier this month.
Dems attack proposed cuts
in Social Security benefits
WASHINGTON- Democrats escalated their attack on President
Reagan's proposed Social Security cuts yesterday and House leaders urged
quick Senate action to restore the minimum benefit for America's "oldest,
and poorest."
House Democratic leader Jim Wright urged "prompt action" by' the
Senate to restore the minimum payment eliminated as part of the summer's
budget bill. The House later voted to restore. it.
"Unless the Senate takes action on this; bill, these benefits-the meager
$122 a month guarantee-will expire for 3 million Americans, among them
the oldest and the poorest, next February," Wright told a news conference.
A source familiar with Senate deliberations estimated there is a 50-50
chance the Senate will restore the payment for all beneficiaries, depending
on "the level of hysteria."
South African rugbteam
keeping low profile
CHICAGO- The members of Springboks a South African rugby team, are
keeping a low profile here for their first scheduled game on their American
tour, which is in jeopardy because of opposition to racial separation policies
in their homeland.
The 36 athletes, two of them black, have been staying at the Chicago
Athletic Association's downtown headquarters. Some were seen late Thur-
sday afternoon downtown on Michigan Avenue after a practice session,
greeting passersby pleasantly but refraining from talking about the tour.
Demonstrations against the team because of apartheid in South Africa has
driven the game against Midwestern ruggers underground, to an.un-
disclosed location. It also was not known if the team would remain at the
athletic club, which has been picketed by a local anti-South Africa group. 1
The mayor of Albany, N.Y., on the demand of the governor, on Thursday
canceled an appearance by the team in his city for fear of violent demon-
strations by opponents of apartheid. The American Civil Liberties Union has
taken up the cause of the South Africans, saying they may go to court to have
the Albany game reinstatedon fred speech grounds.

0

may propose more cuts

programs such as Medicare, Medicaid
and welfare that could save several
billion dollars in 1983 and 1984 and as
much as $1.5 billion in the 1982 fiscal.
year.
Meanwhile, U.S. economic activity
continued to slide modestly during the
third quarter, the government
disclosed yesterday. The report raised
the prospect that the economy may be
dipping into its eighth recession since
World War II.
Commerce Department sources said
a very preliminary estimate of
economic activity during the July-
September period showed a slim
decline at an annual rate of .5 percent.
AT THE SAME time, the department
issued a revised report confirming that

economic activity declined during the
second quarter of 1981. But ther
revision showed a smaller decline than
reported last month.
A second revision of the figures for
the April-June-quarter showed that real
output declined at a 1.6 percent annual
rate.
In August, the department estimated
the economy declined at a 2.4 percent
annual rate. The month before, it put
the decline at 1.9 percent.
ECONOMIC ACTIVITY is deter-
mined by measuring changes in the
gross national product after adjust-
ments for inflation.
In all, Reagan is expected to call for
reduction of about $16.3 billion in 1982 as
he seeks to hold the federal deficit to

$42.5 billion. The plan he is expected to
unveil would slash spending by between
$70 billion and $75 billion over the next
three years.
The latest disclosures of. the
president's plans came as more,
lawmakers expressed skepticism about
Reagan's announced plans to seek a
new round of cuts, including a delay in
next year's scheduled cost of living in-
creases in Social Security and eight
other programs.
"THERE IS NO real consensus on
whether there are the votes to support
these cuts ta this time," said Sen. Ted
Stevens of Alaska, the No.2 Republican
in the Senate. He suggested a delay,
perhaps until March, before moving
ahead with a new round of cuts.
Stevens' comment came a day after
'House Republican leaders told Budget
Director David Stockman privately
they were uncertain about how a plan to
hold down cost-of-living increases
would fare.
House and Senate Republican leaders
have- scheduled a strategy. session
Monday to discuss how to proceed with
the president's requests.
REAGAN HIMSELF is expected to
unveil his plan on Tuesday or Wed-
nesday, although House Republican
Leader Bob Michel of Illinois is said to
have suggested that the president delay
long enough to hear "counter-
proposals" from Republicans in the
House.

Qtur rbobt 'E tiE0

0
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CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
ACampus Ministry of the
Ciristian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
.10:00 a.m. Morning Worship. Sermon
-"UNFAIR!"
6 p.m. Service of Holy Communion
7:30 pm Mixer at 1810 Covington Dr.
Wed-8 pm Special Lecture Prayer of
Latin-American Christians for the Con-
version of the us" Speaker, Dr. Jorge
IMra-Braud.
10 pm Evening Prayers.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH And
AIERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron 663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Sept. 20: "How Faith Sees the
World," Dr. Morikawa preaching.
11:0 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Student Study Group. Thurs. at 6:00
Support group for bereaved students,
alternate Weds. 7 p.m.
i 1:00 Brunch, second Sunday of each
month.
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCa-ALC-AELC)
Gordon Ward, Pastor'
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00p.m. Choir practice.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Fellowship meets at '5:30
p.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
.8:30 a m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Sept. 20-"Building Com-
munity" by The Rev. Wayne T. Large.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education 9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.-Film
on Urbana '81.
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
* * *
ANN ARBOR MISSIONARY CHURCH
2118 Salihe-Ann Arbor Rd. 668-6640
Rev. Marvin L. Claasen, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m. & 6p.m. Worship Service
7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible-Study & Prayer
A Cordial Welcome to All
* * *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL t
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557 s+14
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)'
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment..

The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan: Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 MaynardStreet,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daly is a member oft the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation, 764-0558, Classified advertising

House of Sandwich robbed
'The House of Sandwich restaurant;
209 S. Fourth St., was robbed Thursday
night by an unarmed suspect, police
said yesterday. The man reportedly or-
dered a sandwich and ate it before he
grabbed the clerk who served him and
announced he was going to rob the
restaurant. He then took an undeter-
mined amount of money from the cash
register, forced the employee into the
basement, and fled.
Inmate almost escapes
A prisoner of Jackson State Peniten-
tiary nearly- escaped from University
Hospital Thursday, police said. After
receiving treatment at the hospital, the
prisoner slipped away from hospital
security. He was picked up later on the
1100 block of E. Ann Street and turned
over to Jackson prison security.
Campus-area apartment
burglarized
An apartment on the 1200 block of E.
University Street was broken into early
Thursday morning. The complaintank
woke after hearing a loud crash at
about 3:30 a.m. and found a screen
slashed and his stereo missing. The
value of the stereo is unknown.

764-0557, Display advertising, 764-0554, Billing 764.0550.
Editor-in-chief .................SARA ANSPACH-
Managing Editor...............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor ....................Lorenzo Benet
News Editor.......................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors .............. KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Chief Photographer .............PAUL ENGSTROM
Sports Editor ............M...... MARK MHANOVIC
Executive Sports Editors............GREG DEGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen Jonathan
Stewart.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Klo Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Brian Masck.
MAGAZINE/ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee, Pam Kramer, Gail Negbour, Howard
Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Doug Brice,
Crol Chartron, An'drew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger. Maureen
Fleming, Denise Franklin, Joyce Frieden, Mark Gin-
din, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover, Jennifer
Miller. Don Oberrotmon. Janet Roe, David Spok, Fan-
nie Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Jodi Sitt.
ker, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle, Don Conlin, Mar..
tha Croll, Jim Dworman, John Fitzpatrick, Thomas
Fous, Larry Freed, Alan Goldstein, Chuck Hartwig,
Chuck Jaffe, John Kerr, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman,
Rony Pollack, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
'Sardh Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Walley, Chris
Wilson Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager............:...RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager.................BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager.......... :.... SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager MARY ANN' MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager.............DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager .............. MICHAEL YORICK
Circulation Manager .................. KIM WOODS
Assistant Display Manager ........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager...............SUE RABUSHKA
Sales Coordinator...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF-Liz Altman, Meg Armbruster, Joe
Brod*, Norm Christiansen, Alexander DePillis, Aido
Eisenstat,WendyFox, Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hen-
drick, Anthony Interrante, Indre Luitkus. Mary Ann.
Noonan, Michael Savitt, Karen Silverstein, Sam
Slaughter, Adrienne Strambi, Nancy Thompson,
Jeffrey Voight.

0

'W HY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?'
Psalm 2:1 and Acts 4:25
in the Sermon on the Mount, after telling His disciples, "Ye are the salt of
the earth, Ye are the Light of the world, Let your light so shine"... the very
first'thing Christ said was, "Think not I am come to destroy the law and the
prophets... Till heaven and earth pass one jot or tittle shall In no wise pass
from the law, until all be fulfilled."
When the Apostle John saw the risen and glorified Christ he fell at His feet
as one dead - How will it be with you and me when we have that vision? Will
we be calling for the rocks and the mountains to fall on us and hide us from
the face of "Him that sitteth upon the Throne, and the wrath of the Lamb?"
Here is one of the things He said to John to pass on to you and me: "Blessed
are they that do His Commandments, that they may have right to the Tree of
Life, and may enter in through the gates into thecity.. ." Rev. 22:14.
In the Sermon on the Mount, Mat. 5:38, 39 Christ said, "Ye have heard that
it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: But I say unto
you, that ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on the right cheek,
turn to him the other also," etc. Was Christ inconsistent? Did He here
abrogate God's law of severity for disobedience? No, indeed, rather He is
announcing and commanding His disciples to preach the blessed truth and

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship: 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Get acquainted supper-Sunday 4:30
p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 10 p.m.

9
PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SM T F S S M T W T F S SPM T W T.F S S M T W T F S
SEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER J DECEMBER
6123345647 1 2345:
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 11712713 14 6 8 9101t 12
11 1561718 19 if 1 3 14 15 16 17 1 718 19 20 21 I 6 o1
2J12224 2526 184920 2122 23 24 2 24 25 s6224-5
S 2 25 6 2 2829 303t22
JANUARY FEBRUARY fMARCH APRIL
SMTWT F S S M W Tf s SMT T F S S M T W T F S
1-4 t d 9 R1 W2Tz; e i t.:9

ANN ARBOR GOLD AND SILVER EXCHANGE
216 S. Fourth Ave. 996-9059

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