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September 10, 1981 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Vol. XCII, No. 1 Copyright 1981, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan, September 10, 1981 Ninety-eight Pages

Emptypockets

'U' tuition climbs

18 percent

By NANCY BILYEAU
Students will have to dig deeply into
their wallets this fall as the Regents
voted in July to raise tuition by 18 per-
cent, the largest hike in recent years.
Tuition for full-time freshpersons and
sophomores who are Michigan residen-
ts has risen to $808; juniors and seniors
now pay $910 each term. The new rate
for out-of-state freshpersons and
sophomores is $2,434, and $2,620 for up-
per division out-of-state un-
lTighter
loan
eligibility
By MARK GINDIN
Students panicked by the publicity
surrounding federal student loans
programs have been swarming to
banks and the University's Office of
Financial Aid, trying to secure low-
interest aid before new laws make the
loan money tougher to get.
Beginning October 1, students from
families with an income of $30,000 or
more will have to show financial need to
qualify for a federal Guaranteed
Student Loan.
THOSE ELIGIBLE for the loans un-
der the new restrictions will benefit
from the current 9 percent interest
rate, which is paid by the federal
government until a student graduates.
Previously, the GSLs had been
available to all students regardless of
financial need or family income.
It is still not too late to apply for a
GSL under the old law, according to
University Financial Aid Director Har-
vey Grotrian.
See TIGHTER, Page 2

dergraduates.
At the July Regents' meeting, atten-
ded by the eight Regents, University
President Harold Shapiro, and the Vice-
presidents, officials expressed regret
about the hike, but maintained there
was no way to balance the University
budget without raising student tuition.
A COMBINATION of shrinking state
appropriations for the University for
1981-82 and reductions in federal aid
have led to such extreme measures as
the tuition hike, across-the-board cuts
in all University departments, and

academic and non-academic program
reductions, officials said.
Armed with charts, graphs, and
budget break-downs, Vice-President
for Academic Affairs Bill Frye ex-
plained to the Regents why he had come
to the conclusion that such an increase
was necessary.
Frye said the University needs from
$20 million to $30 million to maintain its
present financial position, without any
further program cuts. An 18 percent
hike in tuition would generate slightly
more than $15 million, he said, an'

amount which would just about dover
this year's fixed costs.
WITH $15 million in "inescapable
costs," $24 million is required to raise
salaries six percent and $31 million is
needed for an eight percent salary
program, Frye said. The factors that
will determine how much the salary
program is increased is the now-
uncertain appropriation from the state.
Frye emphasized that in making this
recommendation he considered the
tuition increases announced by other
See 'U', Page 9

Tuition Schedules

RESIDENT

NON-RESIDENT

Undergraduate
'Lower Division ... .-. .
Undergraduate
Upper Division .........
Graduate ..............

1980-81
$682
768
1,054

1981.82
$808
910
1,246

180-81
$2,060
2,218
2,308

1981-82
$2,434
2,620
2,726

Navigating
The maze of campus dormitories leaves many newcomers baffled as to
exactly where "home" is. This man turns to a campus map for guidance.

-a

AVERAGE ANNUAL TUITION INCREASES

i Regents'

vote closes

15%
10%
5%

13%

9%

geography department

8.75%

8.4%

8.75%

6%

By DAVIDMEYER
Daily NewsAnalysis

On a hot Friday morning last
June the Board of Regents was
wrapping up its second and final
day of discussions on the proposed
elimination of the University's
geography department. The Regents
had questioned several top Univer-
sity administrators, who ,, ere
urging the department be axed from
the University to stretch a shrinking
budget.
The Board had also heard from
students and faculty members, who
defended the program fiercely.
Finally, there was a lull in the
discussion. There were no more
questions. President. Harold
Shapiro asked the Regents if there
would be any more discussion. A
long pause.
After reading the proposal a final
time, Shapiro said quietly, "A ll
those in favor, say 'aye.' " There
was a round of quiet "ayes. ,,
"All those opposed say 'no.. A
long silence.
Geography department Chairman
John Nystuen and Prof. George
Kish, one of the department's most
distinguished professors, quietly
stood up and left the room. It was
all over.

Seven months of a rocky and
sometimes agonizing review-special
faculty committees, open hearings,
private discussions, more commit-
tees-all came to an abrupt end with
the Regents' final unanimous vote. The
University's Department of Geography
would cease to exist, effective July,
1982.
The elimination of the department
has far greater significance than the
mere fact that students will no longer
be able to take certain courses after
next summer. The discontinuance set
an important precedent for the Univer-
sity-facing an $11 million shortfall this
academic year-in its effort to trim or
cut the budgets of almost every depar-
tment and program.
THE GEOGRAPHY department, the
first academic department to be
eliminated, served as something of a
test case for the University ad-
ministration to see how it could go
about creating a "smaller but better"
University.
The administration had to tangle with
the difficult problems of how to handle
the dismissal or relocation of tenured
and non-tenured professors and staff
members from a program that is axed;
what to do with the students in the
department who have not finished their
degree requirements before a program
is eliminated; how strong a voice, if
any, students and faculty should have
in the budget cut decision-making
process; and, in a broad sense, how to
administer cuts without seriously
damaging the University's national
See REGENTS, Page 2

1975-76 1976-77

1977-78

1978-79

1979-80

1980-81 1981

Bursicy
murder
trial, set,
for Oct.

In an August arraignment, a Circuit Court judge
entered a plea of not guilty for Leo Kelly and ordered
the former LSA junior to stand trial on Oct. 19 for the
April murders of two University students.
Following a standard procedure, Judge Edward
Deake entered the not guilty plea after Kelly stood
mute to the murder charges.
WILLIAM WATERMAN, Kelly's attorney, said at
the trial he will seek to prove Kelly's innocen-
ce on the grounds that Kelly was driven temporarily
insane by intense academic pressures at the Univer-
sity. Waterman said that he will show that Kelly was
under great emotional stress at the time of the
shootings.
Kelly, 22, has been accused of killing Douglas.
McGreaham, a 21-year-old art major from Caspian,
and Edward Siwik, a 19-year-old freshman from
Detroit, with a sawed-off shotgun on the morning of
April 17 after he allegedly threw at least one fire
bomb down the sixth floor corridor of Bursley Hall.
Ann Arbor police arrested Kelly in his dorm room
shortly after the 6 a.m. shootings.
"There is no question in my mind that Kelly is not
guilty of first degree murder," Waterman said.
"There is no reason to believe that Kelly
premeditated to kill McGreaham and Siwik.

"This man (Kelly) didn't know right from wrong,
he's going to be acquitted," Waterman said.
POLICE HAVE reported that Kelly had several
weapons, ammunition, and a gas mask in his room
when he was arrested on the morning of the
shootings.
Waterman has also said he may attempt to have
the trial moved to another city if he diecides Kelly
cannot receive a fair trial in Ann Arbor, where he
suspects race may be an issue. Kelly is black and
McGreaham and Siwik were white.
EARLIER IN THE summer Judge S.J. Elden of the
15th District Court declared Kelly competent to stand
trial after a psychiatric examination was given to
Kelly at the request of his attorney.
In addition, several pre-trial examinations were
held to determine if a crime had been committed and
whether there was probable reason to believe Kelly
had committed the crime.
Warren Fudge, a member of the fraternity Kelly
belonged to, has said the shootings may have been
spurred by incidents Kelly experienced a year ago in
Texas. Fudge said Kelly's apartment in Texas had
been firebombed and that Kelly thought people had
been trying to kill him.

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