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September 19, 1981 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page 2-Saturday, September 19, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Michigan football '81 -
Soph Smith to fill Wanler's shoes

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, S
New drum m
takes over 'A

OFFENSE
By BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
Looking for a weakness in the
Michigan offense is like looking for a
free parking place in Ann Arbor-there
don't seem to be many of either.
Start with an offensive line that
features three pre-season All-
Americans, add a trio of running backs
that combined for almost 3,000 yards
last season, the most exciting wide
receiver in the country, along with a
highly-touted quarterback, and one
would have to believe coach Bo Schem-
bechler when he said, "Our offense is a
team that has some potential to move
the ball."
DESPITE THE fact that the
Wolverines suffered four graduation
losses-quarterback John Wangler, All-
American center George Lilja, guard
John Powers, and split end Alan Mit-
chell-don't shed any tears for Schem-
bechler. The Wolverines should have
little trouble tilling the vacancies.
Probably the most significant of the
losses was Wangler, a passing
specialist who threw for a career total
of 2,994 yards, second only on the all-
time list to Rick Leach. "We don't want
to underestimate the loss of those
guys," said Schembechler. "Par-
ticularly the leadership that Wangler
gave us at quarterback."
Waiting in the wings to fill the spot
are three highly-regarded players.
Senior B.J. Dickey, an option-type
quarterback who missed last season
because of disciplinary reasons, junior

Rich Hewlett, who started the first two
games of last season and the Ohio State
game as a freshman in 1979, and
sophomore Steve Smith, who was
heavily recruited out of high school,
were all in contention for the starting
assignment. Schembechler ended the
speculation over who would get the nod
when he announced during the summer
that Smith, a 6-foot, 191-pounder from
Grand Blanc, would open the season as
the starter.
According to Schembechler, Hewlitt
could very well be transferred to the
defensive secondary to make use of his
athletic ability.
SMITH PLAYED very little last
season, completing only three of six
passes for 44 yards. "We had hoped that
Smith would be able to play some as a
freshman, but he was injured all
through the pre-season practices," said
Schembechler. But if potential counts
for anything, Smith should fill the
signal-calling role well. "I spent so
much time recruiting Smith that I
almost took up residence in Michigan,"
said Indiana head coach Lee Corso.
Smith, who runs a 4.5 40, should be the
fastest quarterback Michigan has ever
had.
Giving the Wolverines a running at-
tack that ranks with any in the country
are three potential 1000-yard backs.
Seniors Butch Woolfolk and Stan Ed-
wards and junior Lawerence Ricks, all
of whom are All-American candidates,
combined for 2,993 yards last season.
Woolfolk, a 6-2, 207-pound tailback
from Westfield, N.J., accounted for
1,073 yards last season and needs only

916 this year to bcome Michigan's all-
time leading ground gainer. Also a Big
Ten champion sprinter, Woolfolk was
named the Rose Bowl MVP with 182
yards rushing in Michigan's 23-6 win
over Washington.
SHARING TIME at the .tailback spot
this season will be Ricks, who started
six games last year and piled up 904
yards on the ground. The 5-10, 195-
pound Barberton, Ohio native had his
finest game last season against
California, when he gained 184 yards.
All told, the tailback spot with Woolfolk
and Ricks accounted for 1,977 yards last
year.
Manning the fullback positon for the
second year in a row is Edwards, a fif-
th-year senior from Detroit. Edwards
played his first two years at Michigan
as a tailback, but was moved last
season when Michigan was left without
a quality fullback. "I would rather be
tailback because the tailback carries
the ball more," said Edwards. "Any
back loves to have the ball up under hs
arm. But playing fullback has
helped out my all-around game. I must
learn to block if I'm even going to think
about playing in the pros." Edwards,
who gained 916 yards last year, needs
240 yards to become only the 11th
Michigan rusher to gain 2,000 yards or
more.
As Schembechler discovered a couple
years ago, the football can move down
the field much quicker if it's thrown.
Helping the coach discover the worth of
the passing game the last two years has
been Anthony Carter, only 5-11 and 161
pounds, but probably the best wide

receiver in the country. In his first two
seasons at Michigan the junior from
Riviera Beach, Fla. has rewritten
many of the school's receiving records.
He already holds a Michigan career
record of 21 touchdown catches, as well
as the single-season best of 14 scoring
receptions.
CARTER WAS named to virtually
every pre-season All-American team
this season, as well as several at the
end of last season. He became the first
Wolverine sophomore since 1925 to be
named to an All-American team and
the first ever to be voted Michigan's
MVP. "Anthony's already better than
some pros," said teammate Edwards.

(Continued from Page 19)
which are meant to get the crowd to yell
"fight." But Becher is trying to change
that image. "We try to not play those
things that would let the students -yell
anything obscene," he said.
A commonly held misconception
about the band is tht it is comprised
primarily of music majors. According
to Becher, "I think last year we only
had about 20 to 25 music majors. And
that's out of 225 people. I think that
there should be more music education
people in the band, because if they ever
get a teaching job at a high school or
something, they'll need that marching
band experience."
Although today's performance marks
the first appearance by the band at a

Michig
chers l
The bai
Saturd
State B
band tr
dedical
Preside
paid fc
commil
Acco
d, this
someth
the be,
son, a
Ypsilai
Mich
that
plemer

TWO TROMBONISTS from the Michigan Marching Band give a rousing
rendition of 'Hail to the Victors.'

HARDY'S BAR
FEA TURING:
T HE

W
Steve Smith
See WOOLFOLK, Page 23

<, ;,.

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On your way to the game, stop in and say 'hi' to Bud
at 711 N. University or to Brian at 902 S. State.

1/),
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