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September 18, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-18

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Page 6-Friday, September 18, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Y- SHIRT
'PINTI[Nci
Ann Arbor's fastest!
From 10-800 T-shirts screenprint-
ed within 24 hours of order.'
Multi-color printing our specialty.
You supply art or use our expert
design staff.
Hundreds of surplus T-shirts only
$2. each. Located behind the Blind Pig Cae
2081 s First St Phone 994-1367
rAAn d.rARI3a n
hlrtE E P It T)1

Simon & Garfunkel making musi

NEW YORK (AP)-Paul and Art,
grade school chums from Queens who
gained success and then went their
separate ways, are getting together
again tomorrow in Central Park, and
up to 500,000 friends are expected.
You'd expect that kind of turnout for
these two, better known as one of the
music industry's most popular
collaborating duos-Simon and Gar-
funkel.
THEIR- "BRIDGE Over Troubled
Water" record album, their last joint
recording effort, sold more than 10
million copies worldwide. It was their
biggest hit.
Simon and Garfunkel have perfor-
med together only rarely since begin-

ning their solo careers-at a 1972 fund-
raiser for former Sen. George
McGovern's presidential bid, as a 1978
Carnegie Hall benefit for the deaf and
also on NBC's "Saturday Night Live"
program.
And while they collaborated twice
since splitting up in 1970-Simon sings
on the cut "In Cars" on Garfunkel's
new album "Scissors Cut" and he wrote
"My Little Town" in 1975 for Gar-
funkel-tomorrow's concert will be a
nostalgic event. It will be their first full
concert together in 11 years.
THEIR SPOKESWOMAN says more
than half the songs they plan to perform
on Central Park's Great Lawn are from
their poetic '60s hits, which included

such folk-rock standards as "Sounds of
Silence," "59th Street Bridge Song,"
"Scarborough Fair," and "Mrs. Robin-
son," from the movie "The Graduate."
The rest of the concert will be songs
from their solo careers, which have in-
cluded hits like "Kodachrome" and "50
Ways to Leave Your Lover" by Simon,
and Garfunkel's current cihart single
"A Heart In New York."
"I think people who will be going to
hear Simon and Garfinkel will be
people who enjoyed them, identified
with them and grew up with them
rather than the new generation of
listeners," says pop music historian
and record producer Milt Okun.
SIMON AND GARFUNKEL, who

declined to be interviewed, re-
hearsed 20 songs last week in
Garfunkel's Manhattan apar-
tment-both still live in New York
City-and rehearsed every day this
week with an 11-piece band.
The reunion concert is free. Money
from the sale of $7 T-shirts and posters
will benefit New York City parks.
British singer Elton John performed in
a similar concert last year that drew an
estimated 200,000 people.
The concert will be recorded and
videotaped. Whether there will be a
record or TV special hasn't been
decided. There are no plans for a joint
tour, said spokesperson Nancy Am-
brosio.

c again
Simon and Garfunkel were a major
force in shaping urban folk music into
folk and soft-rock during the 1960,
with Garfunkel's special vocal quality
complementing the lyrical poetry of
songs Simon wrote.
"I have a feeling that lots of pop
arrangers and producers listened to
their stuff and expanded the
possibilities of what could be done in th
studio. I remember listening with a
great deal of envy, wondering how they
got certain very beautiful effects," said
Okun.
"I think of all the people who had
groups and broke up, they continued, as
soloists, the high quality they had
together," he added, "... their solo
recordings are top quality, beautifully
written and performed and recorded."
Postal rate
increase
rejected
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Postal
Rate Commission rejected another
request to boost the price of a first-class
stamp from 18 cents to 20 cents yester-
day, discounting the Postal Service's
claim that new labor contracts compe
an increase.
It was the third time the Posta Ser-
vice has asked for a 20-cent stamp and
the third time the independent rate-
setting commission has refused to go
along.
IN THURSDAY'S decision, the com-
mission said the public already pays
"fair and equitable rates" that give the
Postal Service enough money to deliver
the mail.
There was no immediate comment
from the Postal Service, which
protested the two previous decisions
denying it a 20-cent first-class stamp
and hinted it would try to impose the 20-
cent rate on its own if the commission
ultimately failed to grant it.
The nine-member Postal. Service
board may vote to put the 20-cent rate
into effect unilaterally at a meeting.
Tuesday. The law provides it can im-
pose such unilateral increases by a
unanimous vote and by giving 10 day
notice of its intention.
2 INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ae. of Lberty 761-9700
Delectably Funny!'
Kathleen Carro
N.Y. Doily
LAST 10 DAYS!
1981
frMY
AW
WINNER
BEST FOREIGN
LANGUAGE FILM

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Sat, Sun-1:20, 4:10, 6:50,9 30
$ 50 WED. SAT. SUN.
$1.50 'til 6:00
OO EVERY NITE LOW
$ Pricel (Exc. Tues. $1.00)
LAST 5 DAYS
Catherine
Deneuve

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Gerard
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The Last Metro
FRI,-7:30, 9:40
SAT. SUN.-2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:40
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FLICKS[
FRI & SAT at Midnighti
all seats only 994
CME
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