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September 17, 1981 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-17

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Page 2-Thursday, September 17, 1981--The Michigan Daily
ANN ARBOR GOLD AND SILVER EXCHANGE
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The Natural Place for Cider and Donuts

ochberg declines
controversial 'U' post'

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By JENNIFER MILLER
Due to the controversy surrounding
his pending faculty appointment to the
University Medical School, former
state Mental Health Director Dr. Frank
Ochberg said he has decided not to ac-
cept the positon.
"The contract became so controver-
sial, I just didn't want to have any part
of that," Ochberg said yesterday. He
said he will now enter into private prac-
tice in the Lansing area.
UNIVERSITY President Harold
Shapiro regretted Ochberg's decision.
"I'm sorry to see it didn't work out,
because our academic program could
have benefitted" from Ochberg's ap-
pointment, Shapirosaid.
The University had offered Ochberg a
job in the medical school after he
resigned from his mental health post in
July under pressure from legislators
alleging Ochberg was skipping work to
go on personal consulting assignments.
University administrators had been
negotiating a contract with Ochberg in
which the state would pay his salary as
PATRIOTISM
is just one of the reasons
UM students explore
ROTC
For information coll:
Cpt. Pearson 764-2400/01

U-Pick Apples and

a visiting professor in the psychiatry
department for six months, with the
University footing the salary bill for the
remainder of the academic year.
OCHBERG'S pending appointment to
the University drew a storm of
criticism from some state legislators
who alleged that Ochberg's new duties
were poorly defined in the contract and
that the University hired him in return
for stte support for the University
Hospital budget hike.
University Regent Gerald Dunn (D-
Lansing) has also claimed that the
University agreed to hire Ochberg in
exchange for state support for the
hospital budget increase. Dunn said
earlier in the week that he was con-
sidering challenging Ochberg's appoin-
tment at tomorrow's Regents' meeting.
SHAPIRO SAID that the allegations
are "absolutely untrue."
Said Ochberg: "I've always had a
high opinion of myself, but I never
thought I was worth $300 million."
A specialist on crisis management
and terrorism, Ochberg would have
drawn a $64,200 per year salary-a
median-range salary at the Univer-
sity-but with fringe benefits, staff
help, and travel reimbursements, the
total cost to the state may have ex-
ceeded $90,000, according tostate Rep.
Morris Hood (D-Detroit).
SHAPIRO SAID the University's
salary commitment would have been in
the $12,000 to $15,000 range.
State legislators had criticized Och-
berg's pending contract for its am-
biguity about his specific respon-
sibilities. Hood and other legislators
had planned to hold a public hearing on
Ochberg's appointment later this mon-
th.
According to Ochberg and Joseph
Owsley, University Hospital infor-
mation of'ficer, his position would have
been a normal visiting professorship
that would include teaching, clinical, and
research duties. Additionally, Ochberg
would have completed three major
research reports commissioned by the
state mental health department.
Ochberg said he may in the future
work on the University psychiatry
department clinical faculty for no pay,
which is the same position he holds at
the Michigan State University Medical
School. Ochberg said he may also con-
tinue some consultation and research
work for the state.
Daily staff writer Susan Mc-
Creight filed a report for this story.

t

INBRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Hughes estate settled
HOUSTON- A judge approved the last two claims to Howard Hughes'
estate yesterday, ending five years of court battles for 22 relatives who
joined to fight purported wills and attacks on the family name.
Probate Judge Pat Gregory took 70 minutes to hear claims of two first
cousins and ruled each was entitled to 4.75 percent of the estate.
Estimates of the fortune range from $180 million to $2 billion, but lawyers
say distribution of any money is still years away.
Deeper budget cuts
necessary, Voicker says
WASHINGTON- Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, vowing to
stay on a tight-credit course, said yesterday that President Reagan and the
Congress have made only a "downpayment" on deep budget cuts needed to
drive down interest rates.
Insisting there is no "quick fix" or painless solution that might send rates
tumbling from their high levels, Volcker said Reagan and Congress must
find as much as $10 billion in new spending cuts in 1984 alone to eliminate
federal deficits and ease the demand for a limited supply of credit.
In testimony before the Senate Budget Commit ee, Volcker said the
nation's central bank would not waver from its policy of restrictive money
growth to squeeze inflation out of the U.S. economy. The progress being
made against inflation is too important to be halted now despite the
economic suffering caused by high interest rates, he said.
Egypt-Soviet relations plummet
CAIRO, Egypt- Relations between Egypt and the Soviet Union, warm as
a bear hug under Gamal Abdel Nasser, have plunged to an icy new low with
President Anwar Sadat's expulsion of an estimated1,500 Soviet advisers and
the Soviet Ambassador.
The expulsions were the latest chapter in the history of steadily worsening
Egyptian-Soviet relations under the pro-Western Sadat.
Asked to summarize Egypt's relations with Moscow since relations were
established in 1943, one Western diplomat said:
"It's as if Egypt has been courted by two lovers, the two superpowers. She
had a warm and productive relationship with the Soviets, but it had its
limits. Now the relationship with the United States is going strong, but in a
more circumspect way."
Deformed Siamese twins to
to remain with parents
DANVILLE, Ill.- Severely deformed 4-month-old Siamese twin boys
should spend their few remaining months with their parents, who once were
deprived of custody and accused of trying to kill them, a judge ruled yester- -*
day.
"The Lord blessed us with two sons," Pamela Schopp, the twins' mother,
told Circuit Court Judge John Meyer at a brief custody hearing. "They won't
be here very long. They know we love them. We just ask that they be allowed
to return home."
After Meyer announced his decision, Ms. Schopp wept as lawyers and a
social worker hugged her. Meyer said the state would continue to be the
babies' guardian and would monitor closely their care at home.
Waynona Brown of the Department of Children and Family Services told
Meyer that she had talked with Dr. Carl Hunt, who is caring for the twins,
Scott and Jeff, at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. She said he told
her the boys probably would die.
"He anticipated it would be no longer than a matter of months," said Ms.
Brown.

.r

MR
r1

Only ten minutes from Campus
Follow the map or
Call 426-3919 for Information
3431 N. Zeeb Rd., Dexter
'/ mile North of Huron River Dr.

cc
9 m
Ann Arbor
Campus

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Editor-in-chief ....................,SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ................ JULIE ENGEBRECHT
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CHARLES THOMSON
Chief Photographer -............. PAUL ENGSTROM
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BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen, Jonathan
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0

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SM T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER J DECEMBER
4 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5314 6 9101112
131 15 718 19 11 13 14 15 16 17 15 17 18 19 20 21
3 24 25 26 18 2021 22 2324 2224 25 26 OF
27 29 30 25 6 27 28 29 30 31

1982

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