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September 15, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-15

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Page 2-Wednesday, September 16,1981-The Michigan Daily
Goldwater battles
with Moral Majority

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WASHINGTON (UPI)- Conser-
vative patriarch Barry Goldwater
declared war yesterday on "political
preachers" who "claim the right to dic-
tate their moral beliefs to me."
The Republican senator from
Arizona, who recently suggested a kick
in the pants for the Rev. Jerry Falwell,
Moral Majority leader, said he would
fight "every step of the way" the
religious groups that he said cloak
themselves in conservative political
garb.
"A kick in the head?" someone
asked. "loo, not that high," the senator
said. "There are other goon places."
GOLDWATER, the 1964 GOP
presidential candidate, said he was up-
set with opposition by such groups to
Supreme Court nominee and fellow
Arizonan Sandra O'Connor, who
refused to state her judicial views on
pbortion. She said she personally op-
poses abortion.
But the main thrust of his statement
was an attack on Moral Majority-style
"religious factions that . . . are not
using their religious clout with
wisdom" and claim credit for the coun-
try's apparent swing to conservatism.

"THERE IS no more powerful ally
one can claim in a debate than Jesus
Christ, or God, or Allah," Goldwater
said. "But, like any powerful weapon,
the use of God's name on one's behalf
should be used sparingly."
Taking note of news reports
describing the Moral Majority and
other religious groups as "the new
right" and the "new .conservatism,"
Goldwater said: "I have spent quite a
number of years carrying the flag of the
'old conservatism.' And I can say with
conviction that the religious issues of
these groups have little or nothing to do
with conservative or liberal politics.
HE SAID abortion, busing, the Equal
Rights Amendment, school prayers,
and pornography are of secondary im-
portance to national security and the
economy.
"I'm frankly sick and tired of the
political preachers across this country
telling me as a citizen that if I want to
be a moral person, I must believe in 'A,'
'B,' 'C,' and 'D.' Just who do they think
they are? And from where do they
presume to claim the right to dictate
their moral beliefs to me?" Goldwater
said.

,qq

t
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Parents protesting
Chicago integration

s
CHICAGO (AP) - Black and white
parents kept their children out of school
for a second day yesterday to protest
the integration of two South Side
elementary schools located just nine
blocks apart.
Parents were writing "Return to
Sender" on transfer notices sent by the
school board and warning their
children not to answer the door in case
it was a truant officer, Alderman
Patrick Huels said.
YESTERDAY, jsut 133 of the 942
pupils enrolled reported at the
predominantly black Hendricks
Elementary School and at the
predominantly white Granham'
Elementary Scshool,
The parents are protesting a Board of
Education plan to move half the pupils
in each school to the other. The board
provided buses to ferry the children un-
der railroad tracks that for years have
been the border between white
Canaryville and black Fuller Park.
"You are talking about two old com-
munities who admit there has been as
imaginary boundary there and they
just don't cross it," said Hdels, whose
11th ward encompasses both neigh-
borhoods.
PARENTS FROM both neigh-
borhoods met Monday night and vowed
to keep their children out of school until
the board changes its plans.
"One guy said, 'Don't worry about
the truant officer. By the time he gets

around to everyone, it will be Christ-
man, Huels said.x
Parents who picketed the two schools
Monday and ..yesterday said they
feared for their children's safety and
felt their educations would not benefit
from the transfers.
"WE CAN'T walk over there. You're
liable to get mugged. They don't want
us over there," said Lizzie Robinson, a
black mother of four.
School spokeman Tom maloney said
buses were provided as a safety
measure, so the children would not
have to walk through the viaduct under
the tracks and other potentially
hostile areas..
Another black mother, Gloria Young,
noted that blacks are not welcome in
Canaryville and asked: "Why should
my daughter put up with thigtrouble if
she's not going to get any better
education?"
DIANA MILLER, a white mother of
an eighth-grade pupil at Graham, said
parents wanted to be allowed a choice.
"We are open-minded. Some of .us
have children at Beasley," she added,
noting that her fifth-grade child attends
mostly black Beasley.
But one white parent said he feared
school integration would be the first
step in integrating the neighborhoods.
"We all know that blacks and whites
can't live together," said John -An-
drews, "You can see that all over town.
If the transfers go on, it will be all black
here."

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Interest rates drop
NEW YORK- Interest rates edged lower yesterday for the fifth straight
day, highlighted by a move throughout the banking industry to match a
modest decline in the prime lending rate.
Rallies in the bond and money markets prompted some economists to
suggest rates may continue to drop slowly, with little chance for substantial
relief from record-high borrowing costs.
Economists believe the trend was fueled by signs that the Federal Reserve
Board is relaxing credit reins.The Fed has sought to keep credit tight to con-
trol inflation.
Sun-Times attacked
in Cody case
CHICAGO- City officials yesterday accused the Chicago Sun-Times of
"yellow journalism" for articles on Cardinal John Cody's financial dealings
and a woman implicated in the stories threatened a libel suit.
Alderman Edward Burke likened the newspaper to the Ku Klux Klan and
Alderman Vito Marzullo, the salty dean of the City Council, said he just
doesn't believe the cardinal is guilty of any wrongdoing.
An attorney for Helen Dolan Wilson, 74, a step-cousin and lifelong friend of
Cody's, said Monday his client is, considering a libel suit against the
newspaper for "assassinating her character."
Ultranationalists try to stop
'withdrawal from Sinai
TALMEI YOSEF, Israeli-Occupied Sinai- Ultranationalists who bitterly
oppose Israel's withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula are challenging the
government by moving into Jewish settlements to be handed to Egypt in
seven months.
"We have two groups here now," said Yossi Maas, 35-year-old coordinator
of the "Stop the Withdrawal" movement. "One came two months ago to
Yamit and the second came last week to Talmei Yosef. We plan to bring
more groups to the area."
The new arrivals are taking over the homes of those who already have ac-
cepted financial compensation or new homes inside Israel in return for
leaving the settlements in the sand dnes along the Mediterranean coast.
The effect is to bolster the numbers of veteran settlers who say they will
refuse to leave and who demand that Prime Minister Menachem Begin
renegotiate the peace treaty with Egypt.
Bell wins rate increase
LANSING- The state Public Service Commission yesterday granted
Michigan Bell Telephone Co.'s $115 million rate increase request but refused
to let the utility hike the price of pay calls from 20 cents to a quarter.
Under a plan approved last year, Bell rates are adjusted annually accor-
ding to the inflation rate, minus a productivity factor. The eight percent in-
crease means the average Bell customer's bill will rise by around 80 cents
per month in Detroit and about 59 cents per month in some outstate areas.
Bell said the actual price of pay phone calls is 27 cents. The prie was last
raised in 1976 from a dime to 20 cents.
Bell Vice President Frank Zimmerman was pleased with the rate hike, but
said he was "puzzled and disappointed" by the rejection of the 25 cent phone
call plan.
Senate committee approves
O'Connor's nomination
WASHINGTON- The Senate Judiciary Committee approved Sandra Day
O'Connor's historic nomination to the Supreme Court yesterday. The 17-0
vote clears the way for her Senate confirmation, probably Friday.
The 51-year-old Arizona appeals court judge, the first woman appointed to
the high court, is to be sworn in late this month in time to take her seat with
the other justices when the court starts its new term Oct. 5.
Sen. Jeremiah Denton (R-Ala.) was the only committee member who did
not vote to recommend her confirmation. He said he had-not learned enough
about her constitutional views on abortion to support her nomination. Rather
than oppose her, Denton voted "present."
Vol. XCII, No.6
Wednesday, September 16, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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