100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1981 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.Q

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 15, 1981-Page 9

STUDENTHEALTH Q. A.

QUESTION: Where can I get a wide variety of health care
services, without running up a big bill?
ANSWER: At University Health Service, across Fletcher Ave.
from the Michigan League. We're student-funded, so there
are no charges for enrolled students for most of our services,
and our Pharmacy sells items practically at cost. Call 764-8325
for clinic appointments.
QUESTION: Where can my spouse get health care?
ANSWER: Students' spouses and dependents 14 years of age
or older can use UHS for their regular health care, by enroll-
ing in the UHS prepaid health care plan. Call 763-4384 or
763-2426 for informnation on this plan.
QUESTION: If students are funding University Health Service,
how can we get involved in making sure it is serving students'
needs?
ANSWER: Join the Student Health Advisory Committee. It
meets regularly at UHS, surveying student health care con-
cerns and providing student representation in Univ. Health
Service's administration. For information about the SHAC,
call 763-4384.

APPhoto
Future cheerleaders
Although these young men look like they are lining up for the start of a marathon, they actually are preparing for an acrobatic stunt recently at Funabashi City, near
Tokyo.

HEALTH SERVICE-

We've got answers
to your questions!

I

.Anti-nuke

demonstrators

Acacia Fraternity

tQ blockade plant today

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP)- Leaders of 3,000 anti-
uclear protesters encamped here said yesterday they are
eady to begin a blockade to disrupt the firing up of the $2.3
billion Diablo Canyon atomic power plant.
Mark Evanoff, a spokesman for the Abalone Alliance, an,
umbrella organization for about 58 anti-nuclear groups
represented here, said the protest will begin today, "if
everyone is ready.
"I THINK' everybody is close to ready and if anyone is not,
I think those problems can be solved in a matter of hours,"
Evanoff said.
The California Highway Patrol estimated up to 3,000
demonstrators had massed at a tent city and other lodgings
near the seaside plant.
About 500 National Guardsmen and hundreds of state
troopers and local police were stationed at a nearby military
base.
"PEOPLE ARE really excited," Evanoff said. "The
energy is really high in the camp."
. Evanoff said the demonstrators were making final
preparations, with a series of "readiness-check" meetings.
The demonstrators intend to blockade the plant located at
vila Beach on the rugged Pacific coast about midway bet-

ween San Francisco and Los Angeles when about 300 em-
ployees report for work today.
THEY HAVE GATHERED at a campsite on private land
owned by the Pacific Gas & Electric Co., owners of the plant.
Organizers of the protest have never officially said how
many demonstrators were expected, although PG&E of-
ficials had been planning for as many as 30,000.
The flow of demonstrators into the camphad diminished to
a trickle by late Sunday, according to Highway Patrol
spokesman Ron Henn.
ABOUT 300 workers are scheduled to report to the plant
today, Sumner said, but actual testing is not scheduled to
begin until after the Nuclear Regulatory Commission meets
next Monday for a final vote on granting a low-power test
license.
The NRC is expected to accept the recommendation of its
Atomic Safety Licensing Board that the plant be allowed to
load fuel and operate at 5 percent of capacity.
The utility contends the plant is needed to meet power
demands, but protesters contend the presence of an ear-
thquake fault 2.5 miles away from the site makes operation of
the facility too dangerous. Many are also opposed to nuclear
plants in general.

Domestic spending
due for more cuts,

WASHINGTON (AP) - Having
already scaled down his planned in-
reases for defense, President Reagan
yed further cuts in domestic spending
yesterday and an aide said they could
include reductions in "entitlement"
programs such as Social Security.
"We face the choice of taking drastic
action or inviting economic calamity,"
the president said.
Even so, he said, the reductions can
be achieved "without any damage to
nyof government's vital services."
The president's deputy press
secretary, Larry Speakes, declined to
rule out Social Security as one of the
areas where additional cuts would be
made. He said the total reduction in the,
upcoming fiscal '1982 budget would be
less than $1$ billion.
Later, after White House chief of staff
James Baker III conferred with
Republican Senate leaders, Speakes
said "we've agreed to look into the
possibility of including entitlements."
Entitlements are government
,rgrams, including Social Security,
Medicaid, and food stamps, under
which spending is governed by law. .
Speakes, who had to reverse an
earlier declaration that "right now
there are no plans for further cuts in en-
titlements in '82," said there has been
"some sentiment" on Capitol Hill to
reduce the entitlement programs in the
iscal year beginning Oct. 1.
From a meeting with conservative
congressional Democrats to a lunch
with House Speaker Thomas O'Neill
and the House Republican leader, the
president paid heed to budgetary mat-

ters, even as he presided at a ceremony
officially proclaiming the bicentennial
celebration of the revolutionary victory
at Yorktown.
"At home, our enemy is no longer
redcoats but red ink," Reagan said.
"After 19 deficits in the last 20 years
and a national debt of nearly a trillion
dollars, we face the choice of taking
drastic action or inviting economic
calamity," Reagan said. "Our -ad-
ministration and I think the American
people have the resolve to do what we
know is right and what we know must be
done. Make no mistake. We will."
"I believe the spirit of Yorktown and
the spirit of our revolution is still alive
and well in America. I'm confident that
if we work together and reason together
and stick together, then just like our
forefathers, we'll be all right," he said.
Speakes said "right now there are no
plans for further cuts in entitlements in
'82.1" Entitlements are the federal
programs,'including Social Security
and food stamps, for which spending is
governed by law.
At the same time, Speaks pointed out
that "there are problems with Social
Security." The administration has
said the Social Security System faces a
shortfall by late next year unless its in-
come or allocations are changed.
Asked whether the administration
was going to leave to the Democratic
majority in the House the task of
proposing Social Security spending cuts
or higher contributions from wage ear-
ners, the spokesman replied with a
grin: "I've said all I'm going to say."

STAY ON TOP OF
THE NEWS...
0
I I
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE MICHIGAN DAILY!
PATRIOTISM
is just one of the reasons
UM students explore
ROTC
For information call:
Cpt. Pearson 764-2400/01

S P E C IA
9 a.m.-5,
Michigan Union Lobby
Over 600 diffe
Prices: MOST LARGE PRINTS

I
RES:

ESCHER'S
ROCKWELL'S
CINEMA POSTERS,
AMERICAN CLASSICS
ROSAMOND, GREGG
We Also Have Mats!

PRESENTS AN
EXH I BITION
A ND SALE'
OF
FINE ART REPRODUCTIONS
For the Beneif of
TE CILD CARE
REFERRL.SERVICE
featuring works of ChagallDoll, Matisse,
Breughel, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Homer, Klee
Monet, Magritte, Picasso, Miro, Bosch,
Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth, Gaugin,
Rembrandt, and many,,many more.

iJ,
4)
1p
*I
J.4
' i
'l
4-y
aa'
rd
}'
ro

15-18
p.m.
and The Fishbowl

rent prints
$3.50 ea., 3 for $8.00

-/
- e
/ /
/ .{
4{

Stop in at our
New Electronics Store.

Get

a $20. rebate on the

Open Today...a first for Ann Arbor
SIMULATION
-T TKTTA)N -. .

7

I

I

TI-59 Programmable.
The TI-59 offers enormous calculating
power, magnetic card storage plus
TI's exclusive Solid-State Software%.
Computer-like capabilities for students and
professionals in business, science, engineering.

r JJX

Im

I

~-I. ~WifNI

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan