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September 11, 1981 - Image 122

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-11

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Page 2-B-,Friday, September 11, 1981-The Michigan Daily

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LSA facing more budget cuts

By PAMELA KRAMER
Although University administrators
say the most dramatic budget cuts in
LSA are over, the College's belt still
needs to be tightened by $471,048 during
the coming year on the University's
road to "smaller but better."
LSA's new dean, Peter Steiner
discussed how those additional cuts
would be made.
"WE WERE GIVEN a major reduc-
tion to achieve, and we were unable to
achieve it in one year," Steiner ex-
plained. So the College "in a couple of
different ways borrowed money" to buy
time for making the required cutbacks.
In a letter to LSA faculty members
released last June, then-Acting Dean
John Knott said, "The six percent cut
in the College's base budget confronted
us last fall with a $2,187,795 problem."
Officials tried to solve that problem by
putting a hiring freeze on open faculty
positions, planning varying reductions
for individual departments, and
eliminating the geography department
altogether.
BUT EVEN AFTER those plans were
set down on paper, and after Vice
President for Academic Affairs Bill
Frye reduced the size of the required
LSA budget cut by $300,000, the College
is still left with the task of cutting an
additional $471,048 to meet its 1981-82
goal.
"I consider the problem very serious,

but not impossible," Dean Steiner said.
"Smaller but better means we can't do
everything. (These times) force dif-
ficult choices on us."
STEINER SAID he hopes "perhaps to
postpone" some of the cuts in the LSA
budget for a year through taking out
more loans. Beyond that, he said,
"there will be a reduction in the size of
the faculty, but not through random at-
trition."
Some LSA departments will be given
contraction goals to meet during the
next few years, and most of the cuts will
occur at the departmental level,
according to Steiner. Stu-
dents will have input to the
budget-cut decisions through the in-
dividual departments' executive com-
mittees, Steiner said.
Additional plans for .budget reduc-
tions are still in the early stages, he
said.
IN AN INTERVIEW last month,
University President Harold Shapiro
said that although more retrenchment
is necessary for the University, cut-
backs will not have to be made as
rapidly as they were this past year.
"I think we're over the hump in the
sense of large, extremely rapid
reallocations (cuts)," Shapiro said.
"We are not over the hump in the sense
that there are more adjustments ahead
of us (in the next five years) than
behind us. But I hope that these ad-

justments will not have to be accom-
plished in such a rapid time frame.
"Because of last year's state
budget," Shapiro explained, the
University had to move extremely
rapidly to cut back, and "you never do
as well if you move rapidly as you do if
you have time for a more thoughtful
approach."
THERE MUST BE cutbacks in non-
academic support areas-areas such as
the Extension Service, the Botanical
Gardens, Michigan Media-Shapiro
said. "It probably will be true that the
non-academic areas will have more
than their share of adjustments," he
said. "Perhaps, therefore, the
academic areas will be shielded
somewhat."
"I don't think what we have (at the
University) is perfect," Shapiro con-
tinued. "I don't think that the strength
in the various academic departments is
uniformly of the same quality. We have
some extremely excellent academic
departments and we have some depar-
tments that are not yet extremely ex-
cellent. Thus, I think that some
judgment is called for (in deciding
where to make cuts)," he said.
SPECIFICALLY, Shapiro explained,
the University has been trying to
strengthen its programs in the natural
sciences within LSA "because we felt
on the whole that we needed
strengthening in some of those areas."

Steiner
... times force hard choices
Increases are also planned for finan-
cial aid programs. "I expect tuition to
continue to increase (with inflation),"
Dean Steiner said. "The amount of
financial assistance will need to in-
crease accordingly."
The dean is currently seeking out-
side, private sources for scholarship
assistance and, he said, he hopes to
soon announce some new programs
available to . students with financial
need.
This story was reprinted from the
Daily's summer edition.

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4

Amnesiac

in love

with wife

_1

again
CHICAGO (AP)-When Larry Kru-
sinski leaves the hospital for the first
time in a year, he will go home to a wife
he can't remember marrying, but a
woman who cared so deeply for him
that he fell in love with her twice.
Krusinski is suffering from am-
nesia-the aftermath of head injuries
suffered in a car accident that almost
killed him.
AFTER 12 MONTHS in a hospital
room, Krusinski will return home
Saturday, to join his wife, Janet, who
has twice inspired his love.
The ordeal began one evening in Sep.
tember 1980 when Krusinski's car
smashed into a tree. Krusinski, then 28,
arrived at the hospital in a coma. A
priest gave him last rites. Doctors were
not certain he would survive.
But his wife was.
"THE ONE THING I remember was
touching him for the first time there"
she said. "I thought if I touched him,
he'd be OK. God, he was still alive.
"I remember people asking me if I
was prepared if he would die," said
Mrs, Krusinski, a 25-year-old
beautician. "I just didn't think of it. It
was like a dream standing there."
For 10 anxious days, Mrs. Krusinski
waited for signs that would give her4
hope. His eyes opened. His hands star-
ted moving.
BUT WHEN HE looked into her eyes
he saw a stranger. He didn't recognize
the swoman he had married three years
earlier.
"I didn't realize I wasn't going to be
remembered," she said. "I kept trying
to show him pictures. He didn't
remember them. He really didn't know'
what he looked like. He hadn't seen a
mirror.
The past was not a total blank. "He.
remembers his family and most of my
family," she said. "He could recall
when he was a little kid just like yester-
day. He recognized college friends and
stories they told. He even remembered
our first date when we went and played
bingo."
BUT THE MEMORY of their home
and their days together was wiped out.
Still, Mrs. Krusinski wasn't
frightened. She visited him almost~
every day, bringing him pizzas, telling
him funny stories and saying again and.
again that she loved him. "I was trying
to bring his memory back," she said.
Throughout the long days of waiting,
she said, "He was real honest. He didn't
remember me. But he reallyseemed to
like me. He trusted me right away."
AND THEN ONE special day, after
she told her husband she loved him, he
repeated the words to her.
"I think he fell in love with me all
over again. He doesn't remember that
he ever loved me before."
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