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April 19, 1980 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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The Michigan Daily-Satui

Page 4-Saturday, April 19, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Biting in to the Big Apple

Utah: Good skiing, lousy nil

If you've taken many vacation or
business trips, chances are you've been
bored more than once somewhere along
the way: beaches are fine, but how much
saltwater can you take? Skiing's great,
but snow blindness gets a little an-
noying. Cruises are fun, but the
claustrophobia can relly set in.
In short, the ideal vacation or
business travel spot is as diverse as the
Diag population at noon. New York City
offers diversity and more-it is a

By Mitch Stuart and David Korus

microcosm of the world, and each city
block offers a new learning experience.
What follows is an attempt to suggest
some of the finer restaurants and sights
the city has to offer. Once the
trivialities of eating and sightseeing are
over, keep exploring. The Big Apple
won't let you down.

RESTAURANTS
CBGB'S: One of the finest punk it,
the city, although some say it's on the
downswing. The glasses are fancy and
add a nice touch to your drinking
pleasure-but the boucners are huge,
and probably would not take kindly to an

most expensive item on the menu). Be
sure to have the traditional tea in a
glass. 150 W. 5th.
Sarge's: Traditional kosher New
York deli. Cheesecake goes for $2.75 a
slice and about $20 per cake-worth
every cent. 548 3rd Ave.
Mama Leone's: You can fast for a
whole day, then go to Leone's and not be
hungry when you finish eating. Any of
the dinners is satisfying, and all include
an incredible number of side dishes (an

By Kevin Tottis
Adventurers looking for wild night
life, non-stop entertainment, and ex-
citing bars and nightclubs should not
put Utah on the top of their travel list.
But those who are interested in
breathtaking scenery, some of the best
skiing in the country, and enjoying that
on a low budget may want to make Utah
their next stop.
For some reason western skiing has
something to offer that Michigan's Pine
Knob, Alpine Valley, and Mount
Brighton don't. Perhaps it's room to ski
... or a run that lasts longer than 30
seconds ... or maybe it's real snow.
Whatever the reason,midwestern
skiers often dream of skiing down a
snowy mountain and soaking up enough
sun to bring home a Florida tan.
However, mountain-struck skiers have
been known to recoil into their
Kevin Tottis spent two hours on
top of a mountain trying to figure
out how to get down. He covers
Minorities and Women's Issues for
the Daily.

shrinking pocketbooks when exploring
elite resorts like Aspen or Vail.
MANY AVID skiers insist Utah has
the best skiing in the country. Unlike
eastern skiing, it doesn't get very icy,
and many believe the snow is better
than Colorado's. The air in Utah is
drier, and consequently, the snow is
lighter and fluffier-the powder is more
like cornstarch.
One of the most inexpensive ways to
take advantage of Utah's skiing is by
staying in Salt Lake City. A 30 minute
drive from the city through mountains
that look as though they were pulled
from a travel agent's wall, sweeps one
off to several ski areas.
The areas have runs that can satisfy
the novice through the expert skier and
include well-known Alta, Snowbird,
and Park City, and more obscure, but
equally picturesque Solitude and
Brighton (no relation to -Michigan's
recycled garbage heap).
AN EXAMPLE of the money one can
save in Salt Lake City is the Howard
Johnson's motel. Seven nights lodging,
plus five days of lift tickets for the local
ski resorts cost only $103. Holiday Inn,
Travel Lodge, and several others also
charge similar rates.
Utah is not only snow, peaches and

cream, and Donny and Marie-it has
some definite drawbacks. Someone un-
der 21, as in most states where the
drinking age is 21, will have trouble get-
ting alcohol. The real problem is that
people over 21 as well will have trouble
getting served.
A very large percentage of Utah's
population is Mormon. Consequently,
the alcohol laws are very strict. All beer
is three-two, for instance. Liquor can-
not be purchased anywhere but in state
controlled stores. It's rather dishear-
tening to walk down the corner to
Fred's Party Store and find a special on
Diet 7-Up is the best offer in the house.

If you wa
own liqu
ups-at a
Even I
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on Satun
offered
when Z(
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remains
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imagina
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day of
- citemen

TRAVELING??
Make BIVOUAC Your First Stop!

- t
- -
COMPASSES
BACKPACKING STOVES
from OPTIMUS, MSR, COLEMAN
CAMPING EQUIPMENT
from TRAILWISE, CAMPE 7
WILDERNES EXPERIENCE

01
0 BOOK BAG
BIKE BAGS
DUFFLE BAG

I

BOFRSZ ae
Let us turn your
travel dreams
into reality .

,

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as
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nickels
orcade
ECLIPSE
LE SPORTS SAC
with
INTERNAL FRAMES
from WILDERNESS EXPERIENCE

INT. & DOME
3368 Washten
971-0420

DOMESTIC
14 Nickels Arcade
9946200

INTERNATIONAL
12 Nickels Arcade
9946204

attempt to abscond with one of their
glasses. In the Bowery, next to the
Village.
Lone Star: Blazing country rock
from some of the country's hottest ban-
ds. Make sure to wear your cowboy hat
and spurs. 615th Ave.
Brew's: Very nice bar with
reasonable prices and clubby at-
mosphere. Fantastic Sunday brunch;
ask for Max, a great waitress. Oc-
casional entertainment. 156 E. 34th.
Dangerfield's: Be prepared for gut-
ripping laughter, but you'll get no
respect if you're seen here. Rodney is
usually performing and if so he has one
request: "No pictures, please. I don't
want to be seen here." 11181st Ave.
Russian Tea Room: Chicken Kiev is
great, but you might not want to'miss
the pancakes smothered in caviar (the

entire round cheese, bread, dessert,
etc.). 239W. 48th.
Sardi's: A short walk from most
Broadway theatres, this restaurant
caters specificaly to the before-and af-
ter-show crowd. Club sandwiches are
amazing. 234 W. 44th.
SIGHTS
Greenwich Village: Very organic
and artsy, the village is still the place to
be if you are an aspiring artist, writer,
or other inspired person. Excellent
shops for artistic goods. Below 14th
from river to river.
Christopher Street: Center of gay
community.
Broadway: Check out the lights at
night for a world-renowned spectacle.
The only street in NYC that runs
diagonally. Always a bar and/or
restaurant open.
Delancey Street: The outdoor
market. When you get sick of NYC
prices, go here-you won't believe how
cheap everything is.
Central Park: Great horseback and
jogging trails. Don't enter after dark.
Watch for free outdoor concerts.
World Trade Center: If you're a first-
time visitor, you must go here, but it's
definitely not recommended for delec-
table cuisine. The line for the obser-
vation tower is usually over an hour
long, and (except for the first time)
never seems worth the wait. The ad-
dress is One and Two World Trade Cen-
ter, but good luck finding it unless you
take the subway to Cortlandt Street.
CULTURE
Cultural experiences in New York are
virtually unlimited, but here are a few
See HAVE, Page 5
Mitch Stuart denies reports that
when in New York City he hangs
out in Central Park looking for old,
men with bare legs and trench coats.
He covers MSA for the Daily. David
Korus is a native of Buffalo, New
York, and says 10-footsnow drifts
turn him on.

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