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April 15, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-15

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, April 15, 1980-Page 9

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Few service

decreases
proposed
in new AZ
budget

(Continued from Page 1)
While weight and gas tax revenues
do not go to the general fund-they sup-
port road repairs-if council wishes to
keep up the city's road maintenance
program,, it will have to subsidize the
road repair fund to the tune of $190,000,
according the budget document.
Another pressure on the general fund
is the city's pension fund, which will
come up $500,000 short of its planned
expenditures if the proposed budget is
adopted as it stands. The $500,000
deficit between the city's contribution
to the fund and the amount that pension
fund managers recommend the city
add is an issue which "must be ad-
dressed by council in the near future,"
City Administrator Terry Sprenkel

writes in the introduction to the
proposed budget.
SPRENKEL ALSO noted the general
fund is balanced only through the use of
4200,000 in last year's surplus and by
cutting out 19 jobs in city hall. Seven of
those jobs are currently filled, accor-
ding to the budget statement, and it is,
unclear whether all the cuts could be
accomplished tIrough the retirement of
employees.
In order to balance the general fund,
and other city funds, Sprenkel and
Patrick Kenney, assistant city ad-
ministrator of the budget, made several
minor changes in services provided by
City Hall. These include:
" Opting not to fund added police foot
patrols downtown and on campus, an

expenditure politicians from both par-
ties in the heavily student-populated
First and Second Wards campaigned on
promising to increase security down-
town.
k Deciding not to open the Fuller ice
rink next winter,
" Increasing monthly parking fees
from $25 to $30.
* Delaying the staffing of the new fire
station (yet to be built) near Briarwood
shopping center until next year;
" Implementing further the policy of
one-person crews on commercial refuse
collection trucks; and
" Asking for a five per cent increase
in water service rates.

4

the u niversity
of michigan.
WHO DOES IT SERVE?
Has the University's aura of academic purity come
to serve as a cloak for those same abuses for which
the rest of corporate America must be held respon-
sible, namely union-busting, racial and sexual dis-
crimination, unethical investments, and irresponsi-
bility in its real estate policies? Does the University
follow the corporate academic agenda? Join us for
a rally, a series of workshops, and the first meeting
of the People's Board of Regents.

:.. . .. . . . . . . .a... . ...... n . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. .. . . .. :'.:...., ..r... .................... .. ........ ....v.{. E................... .. .. .

Chinese attempt to
stifle all dissent

(Continued from Page 1)
AT THAT time, political wall posters
could be pasted on any wall in the
capital and the celebrated 200-yard-
ong "democracy wall" emerged. The
rick wall around a bus terminal on
Changhan Boulevard, Peking's main
road, attracted hundreds of people, in-
cluding foreign reporters who relayed
the posters' often startling contents to
the world.
Some of the posters questioned com-
munism itself and other personally
criticized leaders like Mao's successor,
Hua Guofeng, and political strongman
Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping.
Young people also held mass
meetings in Peking's central Tienan-
men Square demanding full freedom of

expression within China's socialist
system.
YESTERDAY'S broadcast hinted
that the wall posters and crudely prin-
ted ?dissident magazines - most of
which already have ceased publication
- are the real targets.
Radio Peking said the wall posters
had been used to divulge Communist
Party secrets. It added that "some
people use them to disturb the unity
between the people and Communist
Party cadres."
The broadcast came on the heels of
Friday's re-publication in party
newspapers of a 1951 law that Made vir-
tually any fact about the country a state
secret unless it had been announced by
the government.

MASS MEETING
PROGRAM IN
JUDIAC STUDIES
Tuesday, April 15th, 1980
4:00 pm
Near Eastern Studies Lounge
3rd Floor, Frieze Building
ALL ARE WELCOME

a
D

big business day
April 16 -17

Lake Erie flooding forces
residents to evacuate area

From UPI and AP
A cold spring rain combined with
heavy winds yesterday to push western
Lake Erie over the flood stage from the
Ohio line to just south of Detroit, for-
cing more than 100 shoreline residents
from their homes for several hours.
The flood waters, described as the
worst in the area in about seven years,
began subsiding at mid-afternoon and
many of the dozens of persons
evacuated were allowed to return to
their homes, police said.
Hundreds of homes, however, suf-
fered flood damage, authorities said.
WINTER MADE a dramatic and un-
welcome return elsewhere around
Michigan, with, up to three inches of
snow reporta t n pstsof 'the state.
Police in hnflhit Mefn Michigan
reported at least one weather-related
traffic death.
Police using school buses evacuated
more than 100 people from their Lake
e rie shoreline homes in Gibraltar, one
of Detroit's downriver suburbs,
authorities said. Those forced from
their homes were taken to local chur-
ches.
Another 10 to 20 persons were
evacuated in the Estral Beach area of
Monroe County, officials said.
IN THE SOUTHERN U.S., bloated
rivers poured over their banks, routing
thousands of people. At least nine
people had been killed in storms which
* brought a weekend deluge to the south,
record April cold to some towns in the
southwest, and the heaviest snowfalls
ever to come so late in the year in
Missouri.
The abnormal snowstorm brought
traffic to a halt on some interstate
highways in the Midwest, closed
schools and knocked out power in scat-
tered areas.
Filoods claimed new territory in

Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama,
where rivers on a relentless rise
breached levees and spilled over
makeshift sandbag dikes.
TWO PERSONS were killed Sunday
night in Illinois when a light plane en
route from the Lake of the Ozarks in
Missouri to Decatur, Ill: crashed in a
snowstorm.

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A Salad Bar
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N tip p in g . -a
Dinners also-
include
baked potato

Pick Up Your 1980
Michiganensian at:
Student Publications Building
420 Maynard
(A limited number of extra copies

and warm roll
with butter.

Extra-Cut RIB EYE Extra-Cut
CHOPPED BEEF STEAK RIB EYE STEAK
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