100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 15, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Enperg kersycrnce
peakers say change

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, April 15, 1980-Page 3
HOPES 'TO MAKE PEOPLE THINK'
Carmichael advocates socialism

in attitude
By JULIE SELBST
The key to a secure energy future '
lies in changing the attitudes of
government and society, according j
to several speakers at a two-day
energy conference in the Michigan
Union this weekend.
The conference featured more
than twenty speakers, most of whom
were representatives or spokesper-
sons for businesses or organizations
that ddal with energy. The meeting
was sponsored by the Public Interest
Research Group in Michigan
(PIRGIM).
ONE COMMON point expressed at
the conference was the importance
of conservation, as opposed to sear-
ching for new energy sources.
"There is no comparison between
the search for new oil fields and the
conservation approach," said
University Physics Prof. Marc Ross.
'he one involves insults to the en-
vironment and is ineffective. The'
~other takes technical know-
how . .butit can be done."k
He said that many people justify
continued exploration of new ,
resources by insisting that conser-
vation means sacrificing jobs.
ROSS ALSQ criticized the gover-
nment's handling of the energy
crisis. "The United States subsidizes
exploitation of its resources," he
said. "Even at this University the
research is primarily in electronics,
aerospace, and nuclear technology.
Things of far greater importance -
buildings, automobiles, basic.
processes of mature industries - we
don't consider these appropriate to'
study."'
Prof. Wes Vivian of the Institute '
for Public Policy Studies was even '
less optimistic. He stressed the im-
portance of alternative energy sour-
ces as the only way to avoid running
out of energy altogether.

necessary
The only answer, he said, lies in
using less energy. He added,
however, that that involves cultural
changes which will take a long time
to evolve, or "will occur at a level of
death and disaster that you don't
even want to think about."
HE SAID the extreme difficulty in
affecting these attitudinal changes
on our society may mean that
nuclear power will be a necessity -
at least temporarily.
'There is no comparison
between the search for
new oil fields and the
conservation approach.
The one involves insults
to the environment ...
the other takes tech ni-
cal know-how.'
-Physics Prof.
Marc Ross
Ross pointed out that clauses in
energy plans that require people to
make .energy-saving home im-
provements before they can sell
their homes would cause certain
problems for economically disad-
vantaged people. He suggested tax
incentives and relief programs as a
way of offsetting the discriminatory
effects of these codes.
Approximately 300 people atten-
ded the conference. According to
conference coordinator Jody Spitz,
community members outnumbered
students by about two to one.
"It seemed like people were going
to learn," she said. The conference
also included a series of how-to
workshops on issues such as alcohol
fuel and solar architecture.

BY JOHN GOYER
Black activist Stokely Carmichael,
speaking to 600 listeners in Hale
Auditorium Sunday night, said he came
to Ann Arbor's academic community
"to make people think."
"To make people think in America is
a very difficult job," Carmichael said.
"America is dominated by a capitalist
system." The speaker suggested that
U.S. capitalism has long stifled free
thought by utilizing the strategy that
"the best way to keep people from
thinking is to convince them they are
thinking."
CARMICHAEL, the former leader of
the Student Non-violent Coordinating
Committee arpd current organizer of the
All-African People's Revolutionary
Party, dwelled upon the urgency he
sees for blacks and whites to fight for
socialism.

Calling himself a "revolutionary who
is conscious of my responsibility to
humanity," Carmichael declared that
he had come to Ann Arbor to find
"African" (meaning black) students to
organize in his fight for socialism.
Additionally, he said he hoped to
enlighten those unaware of their
responsibility to fight against capitalist
racism and for an independent black
African nation.
CARMICHAEL said many people are
foolish in thinking blacks have made
social advances around the world in the
last two decades. "People think they're
acting in the '80s, but in reality they are
acting in the 1940s," he said.
Three recurring themes ran through
Carmichael's speech: Blacks in
America are alienated, white
Americans and the white-controlled
media are hypocrites, and socialism is

the solution to societal problems.
Alienation today is not simply a
divider of blacks and whites, Car-
michael said, but it exists between
those who are within and those who are
outside of the capitalist system.
"THE HISTORY of these people
demonstrates that they have come
from an African revolt to an urban
rebellion," he said, "their hatred of the
system is increasing, their alienation
from the system is increasing, their
hatred is increasing so much, even
white Americans are becoming
alienated from the system."
Carmichael also spoke of the
hypocrisy of an Ameriea ruled by
capitalism: Of the 90 per cent of
Americans who would say they are
SIR JOHN VANBRUGH'S
e(3
HC
Ch
., __ (31

Christians, Carmichael said, 89 per
cent have never read the Bible.
Capitalism has interpreted the Bible for
-them and convinced them that they
have no need to actually read it, he ad-
ded.
Blacks are not excluded from this
misconception, Carmichael said. "Any
oppressed man who says he is religious,
any oppressed man who says he is
religious who is not fighting to help
liberate the people, he is not religious,
he is a hypocrite."
Carmichael was born in Trinidad in
1941. His family moved to New York
City when he was 11, and he attended
Howard University in Washington,
D.C., graduating in 1964 with a B.A. in
philosophy.

.

When you've figured and paid up your tax,
And the thought of unwinding attracts,
Just drop in for a meal-
It's a really good deal-
And the League's a great place to relax!
Sendy
TheMi ;h; NAnn naa,

CAFETERIA HOURS;
11:30-1:15
5:00-7:15
SNACK BAR
7:15-4:00
your League Limerick to:
ger, Michigan League
outh Ingalls
ill receive 2 free dinner
s if your limerick is used in
f our ads.

The U-M Department of
Theatre & Drama
Guest Artist
KEVIN O'LEARY
POWER CENTER
April 16-19-ipm
April 20-2pm
TICKETS at PTP-Michigan League
and at Hudson's

Next to Hill Auditorium
Located in the heart of the campus.
it is the heart of the campus .

227 S
You w
tickets
one of

OURS: 10-1 & 2-5, M.F. Master
arge and VISA by phone,
13) 764-0450.

S I
Hg

I

a

Congressmen raise doubts
about registration for draft

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - Two Mid-
estern congressmen asserted yester-
y that Congress is being asked to vote
on President Carter's draft registration
proposal without knowing its im-
pfcations or costs.
Rep, Robert Kastenmeier (D-Wis.),
told a hearing of his House Judiciary
bcommittee on courts, civil liberties,
gad the administration of justice that
the Carter administration has not ad-
dressed what effects draft registration
will have on individual 'freedom or the
eral court system.
"THE ADMINISTRATION, quite
candidly, has not been able to answer
these questions," Kastenmeier said.
"We almost voted on it last week."
Rep. Robert Carr, (D-Mich.), who
also sits on the House Armed Services

Committee, said Congress, which is
being asked to shift appropriations so
draft registration could begin, has been
presented with only the bookkeeping
costs of registration, not the- potential
enforcement costs.
Judy Goldsmith, executive vice-
president of the National Organization
for Women, said NOW might challenge
the constitutionality of registration
unless it applies equally to men and
women. But she said her group would
prefer to see no registration at all.
"Registration, that symbol of
national purpose and resolve, could
well cost federal, state and local gover-
nments billions of dollars to im-
plement," said Curt Pawlisch, a mem-
ber of the Madison Coalition Against
Registration and the Draft.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '": . + .c.:.. v {h :?:r cr::".ti: 'i* iv:: :{:t ::.r:'.vt 2:e r
I M }:tr..,h..t"?..V <;..
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Macbeth, 7 p.m., The Trial, 8:45 p.m., Nat.
Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild-Broken Blossoms, 7,'9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
SPEAKERS
Center for Continuing Education of Women-Tenth CEW Scholarship
Awards Presentation, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Center for Chinese Studies-"First Impressions of American Society
and Academia," noon, Lane Halls Commons.
Armenian Students Cultural Assoc.-Father Corun Shrikian, "History of
the Armenian Church," 3 p:m., Henderson Rm., League.
Department of Chemistry-Inorganic Seminar, Prof. Robert McCarley,
"New Clusters of Molybdenum and Tungsten from Dimers to Polymers," 4
p.m., Rm. 1200, Chem. Bldg.
Department of Geology-Prof. Joseph McGowen, "Depositional Facies
of the Triassic Dockum Group, Texas Panhandle," 4 p.m., Rm. 4001, C.C.
Little.
Eckankar-Discussion of book, "Key to Secret Worlds," by Paul
Twitchell, 8 p.m., Rm. A, Michigan League.
Ecumenical Campus Center-Ruth Cadwallader, "Kampuchea and
Vietnam Today,"8 p.m., 921 Church.
International Center-Kathy Weidner, English Composition Board,
"English as a Second Language-Teaching and Learning," noon, Intl. Ctr.
MEETINGS
Forces United Against Lunacy-7 p.m., Green Lounge, East Quad.
Undergrad. Poli. Sci. Assoc.-Career reception, 8 p.m., U Club,
* Michigan Union.
PERFORMANCES
WUOM-National Press Club, Charles Schultz, Ch. of the President's
Council of Economic Advisors discusses the Administration's economic
policies and its outlook, 10:05 a.m., 91.7 FM.
University Symphony Orch., Choirs, Arts Chorale-8 p.m., Hill.
Res. College-Writer Donald McCaig reading his own work, 8 p.mk,
ResBenzinger Library, E. Quad.
Res. College-Ann Warde, piano concert, 8 p.m., Unitarian Church, 1917
Wnrhinc+,n

r

11

60.

I

N

THE

MOR

N

I

N

C

ANN ARBOR'S
PAPER DELIVE
DOOR BEFORE
! A 1 I T(~F\AV T!1

ONLY MORNING NEWS-
RS 10 YOUR DORM OR
8:00AM TUESDAY-SUNDAY
CU IDcCDIDE 7LA.aV'%A Cd

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan