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April 10, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ERA supporte

By JOYCE FRIEDEN
Yesterday's ERA rally was sponsored
by the Michigan Student Assembly,
A Student Government and one other
Noup-Students for the Equal Rights
Amendment (S.E.R.A.).
S.E.R.A. was founded in September,
1979 by a small group of students who
were. interested in getting the Equal
Rights Amendment passed. It is
affiliated with no other organization.
S.E.R.A.'s membership includes about
50 students, male and female, from
LSA, Engineering, the Law School, and
' rom other colleges.
BECAUSE OF THE diverse group of
students involved, S.E.R.A. does not
take stands on any other political
issues. "There are a lot of different
opinions around here on issues outside
of the ERA," explained office co-
ordinator Lori Nelson. "That's why this

remains a single-issue group."
According to publicity chairman
Fritz Ruehr, the group has two
purposes. "First of all, we are trying to
persuade legislators in other states to
ratify the Equal Rights Amendment
(ETA)," Ruehr, an LSA junior said.
Although the amendment has been
ratified in 35 states, including
Michigan, it still needs to be ratified by
three more states before it is
incorporated into the Constitution.
To make their views known, S.E.R.A.
members are writing letters and
sending petitions to legislators in other
states. "By showing our mood to
decision-makers in other states, we can
help give them a clearer picture of what
the mood of college students is in their
home states," Ruehr explained.
THESE ATTEMPTS to influence out-
of-state legislators are necessary for
the good of the whole' country,

rs have own
explained group member Jilian interpersonal relati
Mincer. "If three more states don't the group's co-ord
ratify, we'll all be living in an unratified Kim Brady. Some
country," she added. will break up the h
The other major purpose of the ,is give wome
group, according to Ruehr, is to opportunities."
educate people about what the ERA is Equal pay for eq
and what its effects will be if and when goal that the ERA
it is passed. "We need moral support now, many women
from everyone," he said. "If everyone college, entering t
understands what the amendment is, being paid less tha
they can help it work better, after it is the same amountc
passed." Mincer. "Women1
Many group members think that a
surprising- number of University 0
students were ignorant about the D
amendment. "Not only are many .A ck
people unaware of what the ERA is,
many people think that it's already
been passed," Mincer explained. a ss a
"That's why education is so
important." (Continuedf
"THE ERA WILL affect your
relationship with the law, not your plates. "The car b"

The Michigan Daily-
organization
ionships," explained graduated from Michigan and that ar
inator for speakers, won't happen to me.' Wait until they m
people say the ERA graduate!" M
ome, but all it will do Ruehr agreed that people need to be o
n more career made aware of the discrimination that P
is being practiced "before they can use th
qual work is another the ERA to help change things. Once a
will effect. "Right the amendment is passed, the law itself
are graduating from will be changed, but it might not be g
the work force, but enforced unless legal precedents are "
an men (who've had set," he said. o
of education)," said Group members also thought that o0
here think, 'Well, I most of the nation favors the ig

Thursday, April 10, 1980-Page 5
at 'U'
mendment. In poll after poll, "the
ajority of citizens are for the ERA,"
incer said. "However, a well-
rganized minority is preventing its
assage." Mincer cited groups such as
he John Birch Society and STOP ERA!
leaders of that minority.
Ruehr stressed education as a way to
et the amendment ratified.
'Nationwide, there is organized
pposition to the amendment ... Here,
ur enemies are apathy and
norance," he said.

ey, Konovsky charged with
alt and battery in fistfight

from Page 1)
elonged to Dickey,"

ERA leaders rally at Diag; appeal to
*A2 residents in their fight for ratification

(Continued from Page 1)
Organization for Women (NOW), to
over 100 enthusiastic listeners. "We're
going to Chicago (to) say_ to the
legislators in Springfield, 'It's time. We
will not wait any longer.' I want to see
iverybody there!"
King appeared at the rally along with
Laura Callow, who represented
ERAmerica, a consolidation of groups
striving for passage of the amendment.
'We need the ERA . . to
shift the burden of proof
(of discrimination) from
the individual to the
state.'
-Laura Callow,
ERAmeriea
In addition, Nic Tamborriello spoke for
en Allied Nationally (MAN), for
RA, and Edie VanHorn represented
the United Auto Workers in supporting
the amendment.
While the speakers and onlookers at
the rally on the Diag were emotional in
support of their gause, the rally ended

after just over 30 minutes of cold
weather, wind, and drizzle. The
speakers kept their messages short, at
first citing statistics revealing
inequality between the sexes, such as
woman's average wage of 59 cents for
each dollar a man earns.
The speakers also stressed the need
for support in the upcoming duel in
Illinois and asked the crowd to par-
ticipate in a May 10 march from
Springfield to Chicago. Between
speeches, plans were announced by the
University's Students for ERA to send
busloads of local ERA supporters to the,
event, a trip to be partially funded by
yesterday's sale of green balloons on
the Diag.

"We need the ERA to protect the
gains we have already made," said
Callow, who spoke first, "both for you
and for future generations." She
discussed the legal need for the amen-
dment, "to shift the burden of proof (of
discrimination) from the individual to
the state."
Tamborriello, a local resident, spoke
next for the MAN for ERA group. "The
concept of equality is not a sometimes
thing," he told the crowd,"it is a part of
our every day lives. It is part of what
this country is about."

said Captain Charles Wibert of the East
Lansing police.
"I told him to get off the road so his
car wouldn't get hit," said Miquelon.
"They (the University athletes) left the
car in the middle of the street with the
doors wide open and the next thing I
knew I was on the ground," being at-
tacked.
MIQUELON NEEDED stitches in his
face as a result of being struck by a fist.
According to McLellan, Dickey was
Miquelon's assailant.
Burkhart suffered bruises and
abrasions in a struggle with Konovsky,
who had a beer bottle in his hand. "He
hit the guy with his fist and the bottle
broke," noted Police Captain Wibert.
"That wasn't too sharp on his part.
The incident broke out, said Wibert,
because "Dickey thought these guys
threw something at his car." Miquelon
revealed that he had heard one alleged
assailant say something about throwing

bottles at the car, but he said neither he
nor Burkhart had done so. McLellan
said there had been no report of
throwing bottles.
After the fight, Wibert said Burkhart
flagged down a paramedic vehicle and
Dickey, Konovsky and Kligis all fled.
East Lansing police were notified and
thre three Michigan, athletes volun-
tarily returned to the scene while police
were still there, Wibert reported.
The Michigan athletic department

will probably take no action against the
athletes until the issue has been
resolved legally, according to a source
in the athletic department.
Dickey and Kligis were reached at
their Ann Arbor home but refused to
comment on the incident. "They are not
talking and they may not talk about it at
all, said a roommate of Dickey and
Kligis. "They feel it was a minor scuffle
that is getting blown out of proportion
because of the names involved."

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The Ann Arbor film Cooperative Presents at Nat. Sci.: $1.50
Thursday, April 10
NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD
(George Romero, 1968) 7 & 10:20-NAT SCI
A group of people trapped in a farmhouse are surrounded by radioactive ghouls
who have come out of their graves, murdering, mutilating and eating raw
human flesh. More frightening than THE BIRDS, more grotesque than FREAKS
more menacing than INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS, AS HORRIFYING A
NIGHTMARE VISION AS YOU COULD HOPE TO SEE ON FILM. "Kill the brain
people and you kill the ghoul."
(Edgar G. Ulmer, 1946) D TOUR 8:40-NAT SCI
"The ultimate B-Movie," DETOUR is an exercise in sustained perversity, a
consistent demonstration of the absence of free will. Tom Neal worms his
way from nightclub to beanery to barren motel room, writhing to free him-
self, only to be ensnarled still further. Ann Savage gives a performance that
defies conventional credibility: ugly, unpleasant, a shirll, unmodulated
embodiment of Yeats' dictum that only the unexplainable is irresistible. "I
adore DETOUR!"-E. Ulmer.
Tomorrow: Bruno Bozzetto's VIP MY BROTHER SUPERMAN and
Chuck Jones' THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH at MLB

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