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January 17, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N

Page 10-Thursday, January 17, 1980-The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor Human
Rights chief suspended
(Continued from Page 1)u .. i n-3

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night on why he was suspended. "We're
hoping to resolve this without them get-
ting rid of me," he said.
He said he has hired a local attorney,
James Florey, to fight any decision to
fire him permanently. "I don't expect
it to come before the council," Tread-
way said. A resolution to fire Tread-
way, however, is on City Council's
agenda for Monday.
Assistant City Administrator Patrick
Kenney, Treadway's immediate
superior, also refused to comment on
the suspension last night. "This is a
kind of personal matter. I don't want to
cause any embarrassment for the
guy," Kenney said.
Kenney said the opinions he received
regarding Treadway from City Hall
staffers figured in the decision to
suspend Treadway, but hedrefused to
comment further.
Treadway's department, Personnel/
Human Rights, had its funding reduced
two years before Treadway took over
the department and has remained at
that level. Lack of funding has been
cited as a reason for the failure of the
department to enforce the city's

Human Riguts Orinance.
Asked last night if he would fight his
firing if City Council were to approve it,
he simply said, "It would seem that
that would be indicated."
LSA-SG:o
'U' divest
(Continued from Page 3),
proved the resolution 5-2, with six ab-
stentions.
LSA-SG President Dan Soloman
urged that the council reject any funds
that might result should the University
Board of Regents approve the man-
datory student government fee hike.
Soloman cited a similar ballot proposal
which was defeated by students last fall
and LSA-SG's stable financial con-
dition. The fee increase, which will be
brought before the Regents by the
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA),
would affect all student governments.
LSA-SG approved Soloman's rejection
proposal, with only Council Member
J.P. Adam supporting the fee increase.
Adams also serves on MSA.
LSA-SG also approved the appoin-
tments of several student and faculty
representatives - to the Academic
Judiciary Committee and to the Student
Grievance Panel.

Tito

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO PUT
WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED TO WORK.

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Uof M Stylists
Special!
Jan.21-23
10% off all
Stephen Foster
products
at the Union a
8:30am -5:l5pm

1

YES, as a company we're a leader in
fast, exciting fields...aircraft, mis-
siles, spacecraft, electronics, auto-
mation, and health services. But we
also realize that our leadership de-
pends on how fast our people grow.
SO, our goal is to provide oppor-
tunities for future-minded engineers
and computer scientists who want
to grow right along with a leader.
AND, we want to talk to graduating
seniors and graduate students about
their goals.

IF, you're ready to get your career
off the ground, McDonnell Douglas
wants to talk to you. Sign up at the
Placement Office for a personal in-
terview. Here is the date we'll be on
campus:
Thursday, Friday
Jan. 31 & Feb. 1

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Uof M Stylists 4
meet:
Dave, Ted & Chet
openmon-sat
atte Union

L-. .

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-LS&A SCHOLARSHIPS-
LS&A Scholarship applications for Fall-Winter 1980-81
and for Spring-Summer 1980 will be available in 1220
Angell Hall beginning January 17, 1980. To qualify for
scholarship consideration, a student must be an LS&A under-
graduate and have attended the University of Michigan for at
least one full term. Freshman and Sophomores must have a
U of M grade point of 3.7 or better and Juniors and Seniors
must have a GPA of at least 3.6. The awards are based on
financial need and academic merit. Completed applications
must be returned to 1220 Angell Hall by February 15.

rI
INCDONNELL DOUGLAS
An equal opportunity employer. U.S. Citizenship required

OPPORTUNITIES IN MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT
WITH
-LEVER BROTHERS
COMPANY!/m C. A.
ASSIGNMENTS1
AVAILABLE IN;
CHEMICAL PROCESSING,g
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION,
PROJECT/PLANT, OR"
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
The Hammond Plant, located southeast of Chicago"
is the Jargest Lever facility and is undergoing major"
expansion.
Your manufacturing career at Lever will provide youj
with the opportunity to specialize in process engin-
eering or production supervision, or to be exposed to"
a variety of line and staff assignments in preparation
for general management responsibilities.
Production supervisory responsibilities would span
processing and/or packing activities in line _produc-
tion including equipment efficiency, work perform- k
ance and cost control to insure continuous produc-f
tion within established quality and quantity stan-
dards.
Upon joining the company, you will begin on the job
training, which is formalized but allows for custom-
izing. Your initial training will include exposure to
the full range of manufacturing activities including:
Manufacturing Management, Warehousing Pro-
duction services, Plant Engineering, Industrial
Engineering, Finance, Personnel/Industriar
Relations and Quality Control
Through participation in on-going company spon-
sored training and development programs, in addi-
tion to your on-the-job experience, you will build a
variety of skills in management of people and pro-
cesses.
Our company recruiter will be interviewing on Cam-
pus on January 21st.

... plans succession
Tito plans
Yugoslavs'
future
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia
(AP)-Ailing 87-year-old Presi-
dent Josip Broz Tito-the almost
legendary force behind
Yugoslavia's independent brand
of communism-designed a
government to take over when he
is gone. But when he dies
Yugoslavs still will face enor-
mous questions about their
future.
Tito, undisputed leader of
Yugoslavia for more than three
decades, has spent years
tinkering with the collective
readership system that is to
follow him.
THE CUSTOM-BUILT suc-
cession apparatus even dictates
how long Lazar Kolisevski and
other new leaders would stay in
,office. The 66-year-old Kolisev-
ski, as current vice president,
would become president, but
there are others in the wings who
might hold more power.
Tito has been Yugoslavia's
leader since World War II, and
now is its president for life. He
has been head of the Yugoslav
Communist Party since 1937,
when the party was still illegal
and Yugoslavia was still a
monarchy.
The animosity that has existed
between Tito and the Soviet
Union's leadership leads many
Yugoslavs to fear a Soviet attem-
pt to bring their country back into
the Kremlin orbit once Tito dies.
NOW, WITH Toto hospitalized
after unsuccessful surgery for a
circulation problem in his leg, the
Communist Party has been
holding meetings around the
country, urging defense of
Tito's independent politics.
The series of local party
meetings on national defense
here are the first since 1968, when
the . Soviets invaded
Czechoslovakia. That invasion
followed the Prague Spring-C-
zechoslovakia's brief assertion of
independence and greater
political and cultural reform.
The Soviets yesterday
vehemently denied they had any
designs on Yugoslavia, despite
what the official news agency
Tass called "differences in ap-
proach" to some world issues.
The Tass report accused the
Western press of "crude,
provocative and false," claims
that the Russians had any anti
Yugoslav intentions.
Doctors gave no hints about
their next plans after two failed
attempts to relieve a blood vessel
blockage in Tito's left leg. The
president remained secluded in
the Slovenian hospital where he
underwent surgery this past
weekend, and there was
widespread speculation that Tito
could face an amputation.
Tito's system of collective and
limited leadership is specifically
designed to prevent individuals
from building personal power
and to offset regional
jealousies and special interests
in a country whose people speak
three official languages, use two
alphabets and observe three
main religions.

RALLY
for the
Citizens Party!
hear author & activist
Barry Commoner
The Citizens Party Stands For:
" Public control of energy in.
dustries.
e vigorous support for human
rights at home and abroad.
* A swift halt to nuclear power.
" An immediate, sharp reversal
in the rate of military spen-
ding.
* A guaranteed job for everyone
who wants to work.

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