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April 08, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-08

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Page 8-Tuesday, April 8, 1980-The Michigan Daily
8 DEAD, 16 INJURED IN PALESTINIAN A T TA CK
Terrorists raid Israeli kibbutz

KIBBUTZ MISGAV, Israel (AP) -
Five Palestinian terrorists invaded a
nursery full of sleeping children at a
kibbutz on the Israeli-Lebanese frontier
before dawn yesterday and killed one
baby and two adults before troops
stormed the building and killed the
terrorists, the Israeli government said.
The attack, just as Passover week
ended, coincided with the Mideast
summits President Carter has called
with Egyptian PresidenteAnwar Sadat
and Israeli Prime Minister'Menachem
Begin to revive the stalled Palestinian
autonomy talks. Sadat left for
Washington yesterday and Begin
follows next week for separate talks.
WHEN THE siege was over, blood
stained the children's dormitory, bullet
hples ranged across the walls over
playpens, tiny shoes and toys were
scattered in disarray, and broken glass
was everywhere. The kibbutz leader
was dead, and so was 2 -year-old Eyal
Gluska. An unidentified soldier also
died.
In Beirut a member-group of the
Palestine Liberation Organization

claimed responsibility for the attack,
saying, "The raid proved the will of the
Palestinians in rejecting the U.S.-
sponsored peace process," in the Mid-
dle East, according to a communique.

no justification of any sort for such an
outrage against innocent people."
The five Palestinians apparently
crossed the fenced frontier from
Lebanon and stole up to the children's

'We are deeply shocked and saddened
by this act of terrorism. There can be
no justification of any sort for such an
outrage against innocent people.'
-State Department
spokesman Hodding Carter

"They started screaming at him in
Arabic and Sami started to push them
back and they shot him." Shani died.
The babies started to cry and the
terrorists took two small children up to
the second story where they eventually
assembled six toddlers - aged 1 to 3
years - and one adult as hostages, the
witnesses said.
ISRAELI TROOPS failed in their fir-
st assault on the nursery about 2:30
a.m., and the terrorists began using a,
bullhorn to demand freedom for 50
Palestinian prisoners and a plane to fly
them to freedom.
The terrorists, enraged by the attem-
pt to assault thenursery, shot hostage
Meir Peretz in the leg, he said. "The
children started screaming
hysterically and one of the terrorists
shouted, "We'll kill them all," Peretz
told reporters from his hospital bed.
When the final assault was over - it
took "three or four minutes," Weizman
said - five Palestinians were dead and
the six children and one adult hostage
were freed. Four children, one civilian
adult and 11 soldiers werewounded, ac-
cording to the army spokesman.

Defense Minister Ezer Weizman said
the army "will weigh measures and ac-
tions. I hope these things won't repeat
themselves."
IN WASHINGTON, State Depar-
tment spokesman Hodding Carter said
"We are :eeply shocked and saddened
by this act of terrorism. There can be

dormitory.
Yehudit Guri, an Australian im-
migrant in her 30s, was on night duty in
the nursery. She said the attack started
about 1 a.m. after 38-year-old Sami
Shani, the kibbutz leader, came to
repair an electrical fault in the dor-
mitory.
"SAMI CAME to fix the light and met
two terrorists at the door to the
children's house," Mrs. Guri said.

AP rPoro
ONE OF THE kibbutz defenders from Misgav-Aam on the Israeli-Leba-
nese border stands in the bullet-pocked nursery attacked by Palestinian
terrorists before dawn yesterday. Three Israelis and all five terrorists were
killed after the nine-hour siege.

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Sadat arrives in U.S.

for Palestinian talks

S

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON-Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
flew to Washington yesterday to talk with President
Carter about the stalling negotiations with Israel
over Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Sadat's arrival touches off two busy weeks in which
Carter will try to accommodate Israel's security,
concerns with Palestinian aspirations for a
homeland. Sadat has said he is concerned about the
stalemate that has developed since the Camp David
peace settlement, and called on Israel and Egypt to
agree on a framework for Palestinian autonomy by
May 26.
THE SKIES WERE gray when the Egyptian
president arrived at Andrews Air Force Base in
suburban Maryland, but Sadat appeared in good
humor as he was greeted by Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance and other U.S. officials. A 21-gun salute
boomed out a welcoming tribute and an armed forces
band played the Egyptian and American anthems. A
few dozen Egyptians waved flags behind a wire fence
and cheered Sadat in Arabic.

commitment to justice and morality." As in the
Camp David accords signed last year, he said, "we
shall succeed in our endeavor with the support of the
American people."
American officials said the target date can be
stretched for a short time, but they said the two
nations have not reached at least five important
issues:
" Whether Palestinians will have legislative power
over their own territory on the West Bank of the
Jordan and the Gaza Strip, or whether Palestinian
authorities will be allowd only to carry out laws made
by an Israeli-dominated legislature.
e How limited amounts of underground water will
be shared between Palesinian Arabs and Israeli
settlements in occupied territories.
" How land occupied by some 120 Israeli
settlements, and once owned by Arabs, will be
distributed.
* Whether Arabs living in East Jerusalem may
vote along with residents of the West Bank, or
whether they will be excluded from the autonomy
arrangement.
" Whether the Israeli armed forces will continue to

supply the main security for the West Bank and Gaza.
SADAT WAS TO meet with Carter twice today,
attend a White House dinner tonight and have a third
session with Carter on Wednesday.
U.S. officials said the meetings were designed as
exploratory sessions and noted the president is to
meet with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin
on the same questions next week.
Egyptian officials who preceded Sadat to
Washington said the meetings were designed to settle
some smaller questions and the two leaders will not
even try to tackle core issues.
The Egyptian sources said major issues would
have to be settled at a later Camp David-style
summit, perhaps in May. They said Sadat wants
Carter to persuade the Israelis that giving a real
semblance of authority to Palestinians probably.
would attract prominent Palestinian leaders to join.
the negotiations.
Besides meeting with Carter, Sadat will talk with
congressional leaders and Cabinet officials during his,
visit and answer questions at a National Press Club
lunch Thursday.

Sadat paid tribute to

Carter and "the American

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More television ads a possibility

#

WASHINGTON (AP) - The federal
government, in pursuit of justice for
television advertisers, is raising a
possibility that most viewers will find
most unjust - more commercials.
The Justice Department is
challenging the TV industry's volun-
tary guidelines that restrict commer-

cial time, and doing so despite the op-
position of broadcasters and another
government agency, the Federal
Communications Commission.
SINCE 1952, the National Association
of Broadcasters - the industry's
largest trade grouO - has enforced a
TV Code of Good Practice.

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The code - which has the regulatory
blessing of the FCC - restricts the
amount of time for commercials that.
can be squeezed into a television hour.
But the Justice Department contends
that NAB guidelines artificially limit
access of advertisers and suppress
competition that could hold down ad
rates. This, the department says,
amounts to an illegal "restraint of
trade."
"PURCHASERS OF television ad-
vertising time have been deprived of
the benefits of free and open comn-
petition among television broad-
casters," the suit declares.
"The point is this: these are com-
petitors who ,have gotten together -to
decide exactly what their product will
look like," said one Justice Department
attorney who asked not to be named.
"And these decisions should be made
individually."
The TV Code currently says that a
network affiliate cannot air more than
9 minutes of commercials during any*
hour of prime time. During other
periods of the day, the limit is 16
minutes of any 60-minute period.
IN ADDITION, the code says an af-
filiate cannot interrupt a 30-minute'
prime time program for commercials'
more than twice. Outside prime time, a
30-minute program cannot be interrup-
ted more than four times.
The Justice Department filed suit in
U.S. District Court last June to outlaw
the commercial restrictions. The case
has now reached the point where a
federal judge is considering motions for
a summary judgment filed by both the
department and the NAB.
At last count, the three major net-
works and 504 of the nation's 740 com-
mercial stations were subscribing to
the NAB's Television Code.
Should the judge reject the motions, a
full trial will have to be held.

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".... ""just look for the
red tags on the shelves

20% off list price on all new
hardcover and paperback
books in our trade books
department .. . .
tuesday, april 8 through
saturday, apri l 12

The Department of Philosophy
announces
The Tanner Lecture on Human Values
ROBE RT
COLES
Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities
Harvard Medical School
Pulitzer Prize Winner For
Children of Crisis
"Children as Moral Observers"

/
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... featuring the
New York Times
bestsellers, and

Medieval and
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MARC Student Housing
Fell and Winter 1980-81
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