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January 10, 1980 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-10

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Welcome Back
Coffee House
Entertainment by:
Mike Smith and the Country Volunteer

Page 6-Thursday, January 10, 1980--The Michigan Daily

Shooting victim s mother
sues area police agencies

TONIGHT
(Thursday)
9:00 pm
No charge

.C D V
at 1~~
a t the Uias.ty of ichigan
1429 HILL ST.

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
Ann Arbor Mayor Louis Belcher and
Police Chief Walter Krasny, among
others, have been named in a law suit
alleging that the fatal shooting of a
Detroit man by an undercover Ann Ar-
bor policeman last February during a
drug raid in Ypsilanti was unwarran-
ted.
The $3.4 million suit filed last Thur-
sday in U.S. District Court in Detroit,
accuses officer John Francis, 33, of
racial bias in killing 28-year-old Lesiah
Pugh during the Feb. 28 raid on an Yp-
silanti home which police thought was
a selling center for an unknown amount
of cocaine and heroin.
YPSILANTI AND Ann Arbor under-
cover police plus a narcotics team from
Washtenaw and Livingston Counties,
burst into the home just after midnight.
Pugh jumped out of a second story win-
dow and landed near Francis, who was
covering the rear of the house.
Francis ordered Pugh to halt and
Pugh turned toward him. Francis said
he believed Pugh was armed, and shot
him once, killing him.
The suit, filed by Roy Willis, a lawyer
for Vivian Sephis, Pugh's mother, ac-
cuses Francis of using "excessive and
unprovoked force" on Pugh. Willis said
Francis violated state and police

regualtions regarding use of deadly
force, and that Francis 'Was motivated
by "racial prejudice." The suit also
asks that Fpancis be barred from em-
ployment on a job using a deadly
weapon.
Named in the suit besides Krasny and
Belcher are the Ypsilanti Police Depar-

Buyers browse for

books and
By MARION HALBERG
Since University students all are
driven to book stores at once by the
need to prepare for a new term, long
lines, out-of-stock editions, and foul-ups.
are typical at this time of year.
This term, however, the lines didn't
seem quite aselong to those ambitious
book-buyers at the University Cellar in
the Union Ballroom and Ulrich's
yesterday.
JOSEPHINE FILECCIA, who checks
bags at Ulrich's, has worked book
rushes for the past six years. "It's not
as crowded as it should be," she obser-
ved of a busy, but not packed, Ulrich's
yesterday. "I think it's going to be
crowded tomorrow - students don't
know schedules yet."
Liz Kaufman, a Residential College
senior from Detroit, has been through
seven book rushes, on the buying side.
She was standing at the end of the
University Cellar line which wound
through the Union Ballroom and left
her somewhere in the Sociology stacks.
"I just got here," said Kaufman, a
bundle of books in her arms. "It seems
to be moving pretty quickly. It's not the
most pleasant thing, but it's worth
waiting. It's cheaper than Ulrich's, the

bargains
service is better - and I've been able to
find a lot more used books - that's very
important."
Five minutes later, Kaufman
emerged from the cashier's stand,
smiling and pleased with the quick ser-
vice.
"I GOTTA DO it sometime," said
Curt Seitz, an LSA freshman from
Grand Rapids waiting in line in the
ballroom. "The line's moving quickly
- I don't mind."
LSA sophomore John Leney from Pit-
tsburgh said he went to the ballroom
yesterday to "get it over with. Ulrich's
and Follet's never have the books, and I
like looking for the books myself.
There's probably no more hassle here
than anywhere else.'
People streamed in and out of the
Ballroom all day long. The lines fluc-
tuated from very, very long to almost
no one, but there seemed to be few
complaints. The same was true for
Ulrich's where service was quick.
Perhaps the not-quite-so-hectic book
rush has something to do with classes
starting on Thursday this -year instead
of Friday. Or maybe it was the effect of
inflation on the University students'
pocketbook.

tment and Police Chief Jimmy Moore,
Ypsilanti Mayor George Goodman,
Washtenaw County Sheriff Thomas
Minick, and Livingston County.
Krasny said yesterday that neither he
nor Belcher were aware of the law suit,
but that he knew of the incident.
Willis is seeking a jury trial.

Ypsi stores
caught
selling beer
to minors
By TIMOTHY YAGLE
Twelve Ypsilanti area party store
clerks face charges of "selling and
furnishing liquor to minors" after
they were caught selling beer to two
17-year-olds who were working for
the police.
In a recent experiment, conducted
by Ypsilanti Police and the
Washtenaw County Sheriff Depar-
tment, two unnamed 17-year-old
high school students were sent to 21
party stores during a span of several
days to buy a six-pack of beer at
each store. Of the 21 stores visited,
the pair was sold beer illegally in 12.
WASHTENAW COUNTY Sheriff
Thomas Minick said while there are
no plans to try the scheme in Ann
Arbor, he and Lt. Patrick Little are
not ruling out that possibility.
"It could be appropriate in Ann
Arbor," Little said. But Minick ad-
ded that the city is "well-policed"
and that the Ann Arbor Police would
have to initiate such a project.
Little said that even though Ann
Arbor party stores are well-policed,
he said he did not know whether that
meant they were complying with the
law.
THE YPSILANTI cases have been
turned over to the state Liquor Con-
trol Commission (LCC), who could
levy heavy fines on the store owners
or even revoke their licenses.
Maximum penalty for the
misdemeanor is 90 days in jail and
$100 fine.
"What this shows is that it's sur-
prisingly easy for kids to buy
booze," said Little, who along with
Minick spent a month preparing
the experiment.

0

01

Use Daily
Class ifle ds

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City Council

. . . . . .

(Continued from Page 3)
In order to vote in the February
primary, voters must register by Jan.
21.
Even though a Republican has not
held a seat in the Second Ward in the
past decade, Toni Burton is optimistic.
about her chances. She saidshe will
stress the student concerns ot housing
and rent.
FOR THE first time since the present
voting districts were established in
1970, a Republican primary will be held
in the traditionally Republican Fifth
Ward. William Gudenau, one of the four
contenders for the position, was the city
Republican party chairman between

1975 and 1978. He said he has con-
siderable support in the business com-
munity.
Joyce Chesbrough said that name
recognition will be more important
than issues in the Fifth Ward
Republican primary. The long-time
city resident and teacher at Slauson
Junior High said she plans to conduct
her campaign largely on a door-to-door
basis.
The other two Republican conten-
ders, Lou Henry Velker and Augustine
LaLonde, could not be reached for
comment yesterday.
IN APRIL the winner of the primary
will be facing Democrat Thomas Blet-

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cher for the seat currently held b
James Cmejrek (R-Fifth Ward.)
In the First Ward, which includes
West and South Quads, some student
rental housing, and some residential'
areas to the north of campus, incum-
bent Susan Greenberg will be facing
University junior Donald Hubbard in
April. Both candidates in the peren-
-nially Democratic ward said their
campaigns are still in the
organizational stages. Y
Hubbard, who described himself as a
"moderate," has had experience
working on' political campaigns. Hub-
bard and his committee are conducting
a survey to determine issues of prime
concern to the voters in his ward.
GREENBERG SAID the delivery o
city services and property tax reduc-
tions will be the major issues in her
campaign for re-election.
Republican Clifford Sheldon will be
campaigning without opposition to
retain his seat in the Third War&~
"There's a real concern with property
taxes and... the proposed interchange
at I-94 and Platt Roads," Sheldon said.'
He added that he plans to do some door-'
to-door campaigning in the ward which
covers a large section of the eastern.
part of the city.
Fourth Ward residents are concerned
about the property tax issue, the lack of
a South Area land use plan, and a solid
waste shredder, according , t
Democratic challenger Barbara-
Perkins. Perkins just completed an ap,
pointment on the city airport com-
mission, but has never run for elected_
office before. She said she has con-
siderable support in the southeast sec-
tion of the ward and in the area around-
Burns Park.
RUNNING FOR his second term
David Fisher, (R-Fourth Ward), in
troduced a resolution to reduce proper-
ty taxes by reducing the millage on
residential properties at last Monday's=
city council meeting. The resolution
will be discussed next Monday.
Each year, one of the two Council
seats in each ward is on the general
election ballot, the other seat is up in,
alternate years. The current council
has a seven-four Republican majority,"
led, by Republican Mayor Louis
Belcher.
Presently, there are no proposals on
the general election ballot, but on Jan.
14, Council will be considering several
items in the proposed 1980-85 capital
improvements budget that would
require voter approval.

AP

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