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April 06, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-06

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-A-

A2 car dealers say sales good
record-breaking Japanese ai

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 6, 1980-Page 7;
despite
Ito exports
the front-wheel Aside from fuel-efficiency, one a4
oduced only six vantage of the foreign cars is that
import duty has to be paid, accordingto
a local Chrysler dealer. Phil Naylor o£
n, Chevette, and Naylor Motor Sales said labor costs ar
per cent of Ram- the "principal difference" in theJ
to Hagopian. A pricing factor. "In Japan, the cost of
r said, sales of labor is approximately one-half what it
nat same propor- is in the United States," Naylor ex-
plained.

B'y NANCY RUCKER
Despite record-breaking exports of
Japanese automobiles in February -
up 22 per cent from January - most
Ann Arbor dealers report good sales of
their American-made small cars.
Exports to the U.S. rose 34 per cent
from last year, a spokesperson for the
Japanese Automobile Manufacturers'
Association said.
"THERE'S NO question (exports
have) affected some of the sales," said
Ken Kennedy, sales manager of Jim
Bradley Pontiac in Ann Arbor. "But as
far as actual comparison with the
(foreign) cars, I don't think they hit us
as great.".
The Sunbird and Phoenix, two small
Pontiac models, accounted for 75 per
cent of Kennedy's February sales. The
dealer said demand for the Sunbird has
increased, and he claims the Phoenix
has never had enough production. "We
could sell all the Phoenixes we had," he
said.
Ed Ehnis, who has worked at Ann Ar-
bor Buick for 27 years, said he thinks
the U.S. government may be affecting
layoffs as much as the foreign imports.
"The government has sold the public on
the fact that anything bigger than a
Toyota or Datsun is unpatriotic," he
said.
TOYOTA ANN Arbor general
manager Al Dunning said import sales
will not taper off until domestic
producers "build in the same ratio as

public demand. Because the U.S. com-
panies "aren't building what people
want," he said, many people are unem-
ployed. Dunning reports his sales since
the beginning of the year "are up a lit-
tle."
Bill Ostrander of John Lee
Olds/Renault in, Ann Arbor said
business has been good, despite the in-
crease in Japanese autos on the
market. "We have no problems here at
all," he said. Ostrander would not
reveal sales figures for Oldsmobile's
compact cars, the Omega and Starfire.
The United Auto Workers union
(UAW) says almost 160,000 UAW mem-
bers have been laid off because of
declining car sales. Further, General
Motors recently announced permanent
cuts in vehicle output and reduced
operations at four U.S. plants.
IN ANN Arbor, Rampy Chevrolet
truck manager Gordon Hagopian said
he does not blame the UAW for
picketing in Dearborn recently. "The
people who live here should buy here,
and keep these people working," he
said.
Signs carried by the picketing
workers expressed similar sentiments,
including one which read: "Save a Job
- Buy Products made in America."
As for effects on Chevrolet sales,
Hagopian said he cannot get enough
Citations and Chevettes (the two most
popular American-made small-cars).
Rampy is three months behind in its or-

ders for the Citation,
drive "X"-model intr
months ago.
Currently, the Citati(
Monza account for 70 X
py's sales, according
year ago, the dealer
larger models filled th
tion.

CAMP NATCHEZ
LEADING NEW ENGLAND CO-ED CHILDREN'S CAMP
Located in the Berkshire Mountains on our own Natural
Lake-Looking for Energetic, Committed Outdoor People
Positions Av ilable:
WATERSKING, T NNIS, SOCCER, CERAMICS, CRAFTS, GENERAL ATHLETICS,
PHOTOGRAPHY, ECOLOGY, PIONEERING, CAMPCRAFT, SAILING, W.S.I.,
AND GENERAL COUNSELORS
RECRUITER ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, APRIL 10
CONTACT PLACEMENT SERVICE, 764-7456

Heavy training
When the Quincy, Ill. park board offered an antique locomotive to anyone
who could move it, 67-year-old J.L. Wade jumped right on the track. Wade,
a maverick tycoon, must engineer a method to move the 253-ton train across'
a condemned railroad bridge if he is to cart away his prize.
Demonstrators sit in
. at ROTC competition
(Continued from Page 1)

people think about this, then we've ac-
complished something," Streicker said.
Law student George Cole par-
ticipated in the Ham Shoot yesterday
and Thursday. Of the possible con-
tradiction between the event and
religious holidays, he said, "I do not see
such a contradiction, but I see how
others could."
Randall Davis, an LSA senior, said
that he was going to shoot yesterday but
left when the sit-in began. Davis said
that although he disagreed with war in
general, he didn't "see anything
wrong" with the Ham Shoot.
The sponsors of the Ham Shoot were
generally impressed with the attendan-

ce during the week. Close called it "an
overwhelming success," adding that
the unexpected turnout forced him to
obtain extra rifles from Eastern
Michigan university. Capt. John Laage
said that about 400 people participated,
yielding "better -than expected"
proceeds of about $500.

U of M Students for the ERA
present
A RALLY FOR THE
ElA
12:00 Noon + Wed., April 9 + on the Diag
Featured Speakers:
Laura Callow-ERAmerica
Carol King-Michigan NOW
Marilyn Reed-United Steel Workers
Eddie Van Horn-United Auto Workers
"ERA-it's Our Future"
Co-Sponsored by SERA, MSA, and LS&A

Subscribe to The Daily-Call 764-0558
There will be a series of
HONORS CONCENTRATION
SEMINARS
to be held
Tues. April8 through Thurs. April 10
Honors seniors in each field will present the different aspects
of their respective majors. They will explain the potential
advantages of choosing an HONORS-vs.-NON-HONORS
majors, clarify the differences between the two programs,
and most importantly, let you know exactly what is involved
in the writing of an honors thesis. The career opportunities
associated with each major will also be explained.
Majors in the humanities will be discussed on April 8
at 7:30 p.m. in 2225 Angell Hall. The social sciences will
be explored April 9 at 7:30 in 2203 Angell Hall. Majors
In the natural sciences will be discussed April 10 at 7:30
In2203 Angell Hall.
All honors underclassmen, & non-honors underclassmen, who
are considering an honors major should plan to attend the
appropriate set of seminars. Students considering careers
in medicine or law are also encouraged to-attend.

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