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January 17, 1980 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-17

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, January 17, 1980-Page 7

I)
N

Put On Your Dancing Shoes.
Learn From The Best.
Take a U-M Dance
Department Class.

SEVEN OBERLIN COLLEGE students recreate a 19th century slave escape trip will last 30 days ending at the school.
following the underground railway between Kentucky and Ohio. The 400-mile
OBER LIN BLACKS RECREA TE 400-MILE JOURNEY:

Students travel

slave railroad

RIPLEY, Ohio (AP) - A group of ragtag, foot-
weary blacks struggled against the current of the
wide Ohio River in a rowboat yesterday as they
crossed from Kentucky.
Wearing the tattered clothing of slaves, the five
men and two women from Oberlin College re-
enacted the experiences of their forebears along the
underground railroad.
INEXPERIENCED AT the oars and plagued by
the January chill, the students were like the hun-
dreds of black men and women who left the slave
territory of the South across the river to Ohio - a.
free state.
But certain elements of yesterday's crossing were
modern. The students wore life jackets, and on
reaching the Ohio shore were greeted by 300
cheering Ripley elementary school students and a
television news crew.
And they.crossedthe river by daylight instead of
in the welcome cover of darkress that aided slaves
headed for free states and Canada more than 100
years ago.

THE CROSSING was a landmark in the group's
400-mile journey from southerf! Kentucky to nor-
thern Ohio - a journey reviving the so-called un-
derground railroad - not really a railroad at all but
a series of friendly way stations and buggies of-
fering aid to fleeing slaves in the 1800s.
Striving for realism, the students have worn one
set of clothes since leaving Greensburg, Ky., on foot
Jan. 2. They plan to keep walking until they reach
Oberlin around Feb. 3.
"We could only make one-tenth of the feeling that
those slaves must have had," said David Hoard,
project leader. "We respected what they did when
we started. Now we have awe at the fear and the
pain they must have had."
"WE'VE BEEN CHASED by dogs, taunted and
threatened. People have driven by and called us
nigger. We've been stopped on a dark road by a
sheriff who wanted to know what we were doing."
The students have been preceded by a trailer
where meals of chicken and grits are prepared.

They stay overnight at homes that include those on-
ce used by runaway slaves.
Hoard designed the project as part of the four-
week winter term at Oberlin, one of the first schools
in the nation to open its doors to women and blacks
and an important stop on the underground railway.
The trip was funded by $9,378 from the National En-
dowment for the Humanities.
HOARD SAID the group read about the un-
derground railway before beginning its journey.
But he said reading does not compare with ex-
perience.
The students are avoiding motels and restaurants
along the route, but are making occasional stops to
talk to church groups.
Besides Hoard of Paoli, Pa., the group, including
those riding in the van, comprises Larry Spinks of
St. Louis, Marzella Player of Reston, Va., Lester
Barclay and Adrienne Banks of Chicago, Gail
Ellison of Park Forest, Ill., Herman Beavers of
Cleveland, Richard Littlejohn of Bridgeport, Conn.,
and George Barnwell of Clinton, Md.

Two six-week Winter Semester Sessions:
(1) JAN. 21-MARCH 1
(2) MARCH 17-APRIL 26
All classes held in Dance Building studios.
ADULT DANCE DIVISION
Beginning Modern (Willie Feuer)
intermediate-Advanced Modern (Susan Matheke)
Advanced-Beginning Ballet (Christopher Flynn)
l'ntermediate Ballet (Christopher Flynn)
Beginning Jazz (Lorry Ham)
PREPARATORY DANCE DIVISION
Children's Ballet (Ages 10-14) (Gay Delanghe)
Young Dancers Workshop (Ages 12-18) (Gay Delanghe)
Register by mail, in person, or by phone with Master Charge
or Visa. Call U-M Courses in Adult Education from 8-5 at (313)
763-4321 ext. 27 for additional information.
Cn rc U-M Extension Service
y1 ell412 MaynardSt.AnflArW~481O9
Jan. 18-Jan. 19
A Special Shabbat, Celebrated at Hillel
with Guest RA B D A DFL,
Chaplain at Princeton University
Speaking On:
"THE HOLOCAUST AND AFTER:-
THEOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS"
FRIDAY, 8:00 P.M.
And Leading a Study Sesson On:
"RAV KOOK AND SECULAR STUDY"
5,4 URD V :30P.M.

New University Club, and grub

(Continued from Page 1)
Black said the type of work going on
now is the,, first of many steps that will
take one to two years to complete.
The 'U' Club has been plagued with
management and other problems for
problems has been a history of un-
favorable showings on health inspec-
tions.
IN JANUARY 1979, student Larry
Pulkownik, then president of theNUnion,
said he did not think the Club would be
able to continue its operations
"primarily because it isn't a student-
oriented organization. What is needed
is a student-oriented, possibly student-
run, food service."
Those now involved with the Club
said they are hopeful that Pulkownik
was correct, and that a student-
oriented, or at least community-orien-
ted, Club will be successful.
The current changes at the 'U' Club
include painting, refurbishing the bar,
removing old curtains to show off the
window design, and adding many plan-
ts. Carpeting also will be stripped to
reveal a tile floor.
*SLINE SAID a major impetus for the
entire Union renovation program came
from concerned students, but "just
'calling it (the Union) a student center
doesn't make it one. Without real good
food service we're never going to at-
tract the students back to the building."
One of the major priorities in the
long-range plan (for the Union) is to
provide "dynamite" dining, Sline said.
Requirements for such dining, he said,
would include "good service, high
quality food, and reasonable prices."
Black said an attitude change ac-
*companied the decision to make the
physical renovations. "For so long,
every effort was made not to make the
students feel a part of it (the Union)."
Now, Black claims, the idea is the more
patrons, students or otherwise, the bet-
ter.
MOST OLD members, he added,
were not greatly upset by the change in
outlook. "The old members were pretty

well dissatisfied (with the former
operation). I think the majority of the
old members were in favor of seeing
some changes made down here," Black
explained.
Prof. Charles "Fritz" Lehmann,
president of the 'U' Club board of direc-
tors, said he was hopeful the changes
will be successful.
"(W e expect) a larger clientele, par-
ticularly since the University com-
munity has now been blanketed in,"
Lehmann said.
BLACK SAID he hoped the 'U' Club

might be self-sufficient in one year, but
warned changes in the Union have been
(and will be) "traumatic."
The new 'U' Club menu was carefully
constructed to be "as broad as
possible," Black said. "We don't want
to discourage anyone from coming in."
Featured items will include "Th4
Bread Board," a submarine sandwich
priced by the inch (vegetarian version
also available), and various soups,
salads, sandwiches, and entrees. A
Sunday brunch and special prices at the
bar on Sunday night also are scheduled.

If you are
serious about
Law School, you
can't afford
not to consider
our time-proven
program. We
offer you more:

I

ALSO:

SERVICES:

I

Friday-5:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX AND CONSERVATIVE MINYANS
Saturday-9:30 a.m.
ORTHODOX MINYAN
MEALS:
Friday-6:45 p.m.
FULL COURSE SHABBAT DINNER $3.00

.I

Saturday-12:00 noon
SHABBAT LUNCH $1.50
Reservations for both must be
made by noon Friday. All at:

Studying
got you
down

Take a
break

Ut the UM.v i.ty d fthf

Classes Now Forming for the
* February 2 LSAT
Phone 1-261-SAT for complete
nformation without cost or obligation.

1429 Hill Street-663-3336

r.

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1980-81 ACADEMIC YEAR,

rI

The University of Michigan
Center for Japanese Studies &
Department of For Eastern Languages
and Literatures
PUBLIC LECTURE

At!

Available Starting January 17,

, 1980
500 SAB

In Ms. Charlene Coady's Office,

1

1

"TOKYO IN TE MEL/ PERIOD"
EDWARD G. SEIDENSTICKER
Professor of Japanese Literature
Columbia University
Thursday, January' 17, 1980-4-5 pm
200 lane Hall, Washington and state streets

6

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Study in London and Stockholm
SUMMER OF '80
COMPARATIVE HEALTH SYSTEMS

POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director, Assistant
Resident Director, Resident
Advisor, Head Librarian, Resident
Fellow, Minority Peer Advisors
and Graduate Student Teaching
Assistant
Advisory positions require the completion of a minimum of 55 credit hours by the end of the 1980
Winter Term for the Resident Fellows in Residential College, Resident Advisor and Minority Peer
Advisor positions; Graduate status for Graduate Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot Program,
Head Librarian, and Resident Director positions. However, qualified undergraduate applicants
may be considered for the Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann Arbor Campus
during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours by the
end of the 1980 Winter Term. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in resi-
dence halls at University level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must have a
2.5 cumulative grade point average in the school or college in which they are enrolled. Graduate
applicants must be in good academic standing at the end of the 1979 Fall term in the school or
college in which they are enrolled. (5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to

July 5-Aug. 29, 1980
6 week intensive course 6 se

mester credits-

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