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April 03, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-03

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, April 3, 1980-Page 9

Chap in
By FRED FIEBER
Much of the world is hungry, and Harry
*hapin doesn't want anyone to forget it. Chapin
appeared in concert Tuesday night at Michigan
Theater as a guest of the Committee Concerned
with World Hunger.
But hunger isn't the singer-activist's only
concern.
"Our basic problem is that people are no
longer serious about our society. We have the
tragedies of neglected old people, battered
children, and hunger in our midst. Someone's
' to raise consciousness,' he said.
THE SINGER, WHO is also a member of the
Presidential Commission Against World
Hunger, was in town in conjunction with World
Hunger Week.

0
: U.s. c
During his brief stay, he set up an afternoon
press conference, gave pre-concert interviews,-"
sang and lectured for three hours, signed
autographs, and gave more interviews.
The theme through all the sessions was the
same, "Hunger is the most unacceptable
system of a world which should have long since
dealt with the problem. There's more than
enough food on this planet. Why do people go
hungry?" Chapin asked.
CHAPIN BELIEVES much of the problem is
the fault of America's leaders' and institutions'
unwillingness to talk about the problem.
"Because of it, we have to be the ombudsmen,
we have to get involved," he said.
But he cautioned people to be thoughtful in
their eagerness to get involved. "Merely

i

G

r
ii't ignww
sending money to the starving won't solve their ]
problem, because it isn't enough. The $730
million raised in this country last year on
behalf of the world's hungry was only enough to
provide each starving person with $1.50 worth ]
of food for the whole year," he said.
As a result, Chapin has decided to take a
different tack in combatting the problem. "We
need to change policy in Washington. You
know, conglomerates such as Nestle's, I.T. & T.
and Gulf Oil want you to feed the hungry
because it will take the weight off them. But not
one cent of the benefits from my concerts will
go directly toward feeding the hungry. It will
go toward lobbying to change policy."
"I'M NOT JUT another socialist," Chapin
said. "I'm challenging those who say we do ]

world

have a free enterprise system-they're the
ones who aren't seeing the real world. We have
a high school textbook case of monopolies and
oligopolies in America. If you don't want to
believe your eyes, ears, heart and brain, than
it's your problem, not mine."
"I'm not ready to be a socialist yet. We still
need to have individual incentive in society but
not without a democratic choice about what
those areas are, and certainly not with the kind
of market control that we have. When this
world is falling apart, I'm not so sure we need a
man on the moon. While you may not agree
with my solutions, you have to agree with my
analysis of the problem."
Chapin says that food cooperatives are one
positive step toward changing the U.S. food

hunger
market. "They are a logical alternative to
supermarkets-they provide safer, more
nutritious food and money is not wasted on
middlemen. Thus, they are following the
patterns of a true free enterprise system," he
said.
Chapin also had some advice for University
students. "If U-M students as a category are
not in the process of helping us save America
and solve its problems, then we have no hope. If
a significance percentage of people at an
institution as extraordinary as this are not
truly concerned with the problems of the way
society is going, then I think we're in trouble,"
he said.

t

No grads file for

RSG election

By BETH PERSKY
With only two days left to file, no
ackham students have indicated an
interest in running for seats on their
Zevon -
out of luck
(Continued from Page 7)
I SHOULD mention the penultimate
evon conceit: that is, his newly-found
talent for creating classical string "in-
terludes." In keeping with his classy
"wine and bullets" attitude, Zevon:
decides that maybe we should
"mature" a little bit before we indulge
jin our serious games. Supposedly
Warren lived near Igor Stravinski in his
youth, and wart profoundly influenced
by him. Well, Zevon has about as much
status as a classical writer as I do as a
itar player: a lot of expectations and
absolutely no talent.
Warren Zevon has stayed fairly close
to Jackson Browns throughout his
career; not only as a friend, but also as
a musical accomplice.' Both have
slowly digressed from their first
albums onward, and both are stuck in
tried and true formulas. The major dif-
ference between them is that while
Browne accepts his place as a romantic
courtesan, Zevon continues to delude
*imself into thinking he's something
other than what he truly is: a one
(maybe two) joke artist whom it is very
difficult to 'take seriously. Though
Browns wrote the song about himself, it
is easy to surmise that Warren Zevon is
the real Pretender. Don't even bother
saying a prayer.

school's student government.
In past elections, according to
present Rackham Student Government
(RSG) leaders, few students have filed
for positions on the ballot, and most
government members were either
write-in candidates or were recruited
by other RSG members. Last year, for
example, several write-in candidates
indicated after their election that they
had no knowledge of their candidacy.
In addition' to difficulties involving
students in 'the graduate school
government, RSG is often faced with a.
lack of voters in the elections. Though
6,300 students are enrolled in the
Rackham graduate school, only 60
voted in last fall's election.
ACCORDING TO Kevin Tamaki,
chair of the RSG election committee,
both problems are due to a combintion
of factors, including time shortages for
graduate students, student apathy, and
general disinterest.

"Graduate students feel RSG doesn't
represent them, and don't have the
time to put into it," said Tamaki, who
added that graduate students "'don't
feel as close to us (RSG) as
undergraduates wouldto MSA."
Because of the .involvement of
graduate students in the academic
world, he said, they "generally don't
have as much time to put into" student
government as undergraduates.
ELECTIONS COMMITTEE member
Barbara Baker cited the problems of
time constraints and apathy also, but
added that RSG has a low budget,
leading graduate students to believe
they "can't get much done" through
RSG. According to Baker, a great deal
can still be accomplished without an
extensive budget.
Despite budgetary constraints in
RSG, recent projects have included a
student survey, a graduate student
handbook, a newsletter, and thesis

support groups. In addition, said
Tamaki, RSG is making an effort to
establish a grass roots network to
increse publicity for themselves.
Positions available in Tuesday and
Wednesday's election include
president, vice-president, and 12
representatives from Rackham's five
divisions. The elections are held twice a
year.

THE DEPARTMENT OF
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
PRESENTS A PUBLIC LECTURE
Martha Vicinus
Professor of English at Indiana University, Bloomington
"Helpless and Unfriended"
Nineteenth-Century
Domestic Melodrama
THURSDAY, APRIL 3,1980-4 P.M.
WEST CONFERENCE ROOM RACKHAM

4

The All

Media Company
presents:

BETWEEN

110.
S,;,A

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All speakers of English as a second language* are invited
to take part in an experimental test of English language
proficiency to be given in ANGELL HALL AT 7:00 ON APRIL
7 AND 10.
You will receive $7.00 for approximately 1/ hours of
your time. In addition, test results will be made avail-
able to participants. If Interested in taking the test,
call the following numbers to register:
764-2413, 764-2416

JOBS,
an original rock musical/drama
April 3,4, 5; 8:00 p.m.
Lydia Mendellsohn
Theatre
in the Michigan League
TICKETS $2.00 reserved
available at the Michigan Union,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre Box Office,
and Schoolkid's Records

TONIGH

This event co-sponsored by
Michigan Student Assembly
and with support of the

* No ELI students currently enrolled
Courses are eligible for the test.

in the Intensive English

AMM

Michigan Council
for the Arts
1200 Sixth Avenue
Detroit, Mt 48226

21

_ _
...

RECORD LIQUD

TbO

Si

LE

Due to Our Planned Remodeling
UNIVERSITY CELLAR is Discontinuing its\ Pop-Rock-Jazz* Collection
EVERYTHING MUST GO

'C

OFFF

The'Price on the Sticker

ALL SALES FINAL

*CLASSICAL RECORDS NOT ON SALE

NO DEALERS

Notice to all CLASSICAL customers: We intend to maintain and enlarge the

classical

section

and continue to offer substantial

savings.

A store

which sells

exclusively classical merchandise

is admittedly an experiment which has not

been tried in this community. Its success will depend on your continued support.

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