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April 01, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-01

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01

2-Tuesday, April 1, 1980-The Michigan Daily
First Ward candidates

(Continued from Page 1)
campaign officials said they doubt if a
high or low turnout will change the out-
come one way or another.
Based on a study of City Council elec-
tions since 1973, roughly one-quarter of
the potential voters vote on election
day, according to First Ward
Democratic Chairman David Cahill.
GRADUATE STUDENT Mark Peter-
son, who serves as Greenberg's cam-
paign adviser, said he doubts students
will be especially receptive to Hubbard.
Students traditionally don't turn out in
high numbers to vote, and when they

do, they vote overwhelmingly
Democratic, Peterson said.
"'His (Hubbard's) real constituency
as a Republican is in the residential
area," said Peterson.'"I don't think
they trust students that much."
Peterson also predicts the turnout
will be low. He said he estimates that
between 2,000 and 2,500 of a 20,000
population ward will vote next Monday.
Cahill said it will probably be closer to
3,000.
While Greenberg said she is "never
optimistic until the ballots are cast,"
Peterson said he feels the Democratic

incumbent doesn't have too
worry about. Greenberg's c
treasurer Steve Pinney said h(
her to win by a two-to-one mar
SAYS HUBBARD, "I thinl
going to be a big surprise on M
the Democrats may lose one of
called 'safe' wards." The las
Republican council candidate
the First Ward was in1976.
An informal poll taken of 100
ts in South and West Quads y
indicated that 90 per cent
students questionedsaid the:
plan to vote in Monday's ele
either because they weren't r
to vote in the city or they knev
about the election.
"I'm not registered to vot
Arbor," said sophomore La
dman, a resident of West Qua(
- absentee in the elections at hor
Another West Quad sophom
Jorissen, said, "I am register
won't vote due to ignorance."
EARLY IN the campaign,
claimed Greenberg had one of
attendance records, on counc
two years as a council membe
berg has attended a total of:

sling mud
much to council meetings.
ampaign Hubbard defended what he admits
e expects were false accusations by saying he had
gin. noticed Greenberg's "legislative ac-
k there's complishments" were so "negligible"
[onday - that he assumed she never attended the
f their so- meetings.
t time a Hubbard has also lashed out at a
has won Greenberg statement that the city
could provide more "affordable
residen- housing" by encouraging the use of
esterday pre-fabricated and mobile homes.
of those Greenberg denies she ever made the
y did not statement, although she did propose the
ctions - idea in an interview with the Daily.
egistered Hubbard had requested a debate be
w nothing held between himself and the
e in Ann Democratic incumbent, but later can-
.e L an-celled the showdown.
rry Lan- Jaye said the Hubbard campaign
d. "I vote "decided it would not be good for both
me. sides of the campaign to start slinging
ored, butI mud at this late date." Cahill said Jaye
contacted him to cancel the debate
because "the atmosphere was so bad."
Hubbard Jaye also mentioned that the Hub-
the worst bard camp was especially upset by an
il. In her Ann Arbor Observer article which
1r, Green- labeled their choice for the council seat
103 of 106 "the worst candidate of the month."

_I

BELLA

ABZUG

IN A
UAC -VIEWPOINT PRESENTATION

.E
O_.
0~o-

APRIL
A T

3

HI LL

AUDITORIUM

.1

$1. 50 advance/$Z.00 at door

763-1107

FOR GRAD.' STUDENTS ONLY

I

Candidates needed for.

11

RACKHAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SPRING ELECTION-APRIL 8 and 9

Apply at RSG
or Call 764-5271

2006 Rackham Bldg.
M-F 9 am-12 noon

DEADLINE: FRIDAY, APRIL 4

Daily Official Bulletin
TUESDAY, APRIL 1,1980
Daily Calendar:
WUOM: Economic Club of Detroit, William H.
Donaldson, Dean Yale School of Organization and
Maagement, "Constructive Coexistence: Mandate
for Business and Government in the 80's," 10:15a.m.
Physics/Astronomy: S. Krimm, "How Do
Macromolecules Fold in Polymer Crystals?" 2038
Randall, 4 p.m.
English/History: Margaret Gibson, U-Liverpool,
England, "Boethius in the Carolingian Schools," E.
Conf. Rackham, 4 p.m.
Industrial and Operations Engineering: David Ar-
nold, U-East Anglia, England, "Computer
'Graphics," 243W. Eng., 4:10pp.m.
Computing Center: Paul Pickelmann,
"Programming Language Pascal," Seminar Room,
1st floor, Computing Center, 7p.m.
SUMMER JOBS
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
FEDERAL INTERNSHIP: Outdoor Recreation
Technician, assist in the coordination of the policy
updates for the management of the National Wildlife
Refuge System. Requirements: Must be returning to
school in the fall. Must have completed sophomore
year as a minimum. Grad student preferred. See
vicki Lawrence, 3200 SAB, for details and ap-
plication materials. Deadline: April 9.
ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
THE INN ON MACKINAC, Mackinac Island, MI.
All types of positions in the hospitality industry. Sign
up now for interviews on April 2.
OHIO EASTER SEALS CAMP. Still has openings
for males in camp for handicapped children. Sign up
beginning April 1 for interviews on Apr#7.
CAMP FIRE GIRLS OF DETROIT: All types of
camp positions. Sign up beginning April 1 forinter-
views on April 8. Work-study funds available.
CAMP TAMARACK, Ortonville and Brighton, MI.
All types of camp positions. Sign up beginning April 1
for interviews on April 9.
CAMP NATCHEZ, West Copake, NY. All types of
camp positions. Sign up beginning April 1 for inter-
views on April 10.
CAMP TANUGA, Kalkaska, MI. All types of camp
positions. Sign up beginning April 1 for interviews on
April 11.
SIGN UP PROCEDURES: On Tuesdays, you may
come to Ro9m 3529 SAB and sign up in person to in-
terview with organizations scheduled to visit during
the following week. Beginning on Wednesdays and
continuing throughout the week you may sign up in
person or by phone. Call 764-7456.
For more details about these organizations and
others offering summer employment, check the in-
formation in the Summer Jobs section of Career
Planning and Placement, 3200 SAB.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
High court rules against
party-affiliation firings
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court ruled yesterday, in a 6-3 opinion,
that it is unconstitutional to fire a public official solely because of party
affiliation. This affirmed a ruling barring a Democratic public defender in
Rockland County, N.Y., from dismissing two Republican assistants
inherited from his predecessor.
The court said government employees cannot be fired solely because of
their political party unless "party affiliation is an appropriate requirement
for effective performance of the public office involved." Without that proof,
a political firing violates an individual's constitutionally guaranteed
freedom of association, Justice John Paul Stevens wrote for the court.
Contract talks stalled, N.Y.
transit strike possible
NEW YORK - Contract talks aimed at averting a walkout by city
transit workers stalled yesterday hours before a deadline for a strike that
would strand millions of subway and bus riders.
Local 100 of the Transport Workers Union, representing 33,600 subway
and bus workers, said it would strike at 12:01 a.m. today unless its money
demands were met. A walkout would shut down the city's 230-mile subway
system and more than 1,600 miles of bus routes, forcing 2.7 million daily
riders to find other ways of getting to work. Mayor Edward Koch, who
previously had refused union requests that he join the talks, said yesterday
he would bring advice, but no money, to the bargaining.
Public Service Commission
to rule on Bell rate hike
LANSING - The state Public Service Commission is set to rule today on
a long-sought $146 million rate hike for Michigan Bell.
The increase, first requested in December 1978, would affect all three
million Bell customers across the state, including business and private
telephone rates. Should the full amount be granted, the average customer4
would pay 5.5 per cent more. Bell was granted a $41.2 million interim hike
last June, but wants another $105 million to offset rising costs.
Doctors say shah needs
chemotherapy treatment
CAIRO, Egypt - Doctors who removed the former shah of Iran's
enlarged spleen say cancer has spread to his liver, requiring renewed 4
chemotherapy treatment, according to a medical bulletin issued yesteday.
The bulletin said the shah was recovering normally from last week's
surgery and that he has been moved from the intensive care unit to a private
room at the Maadi military hospital.
Two killed, many forced to
flee in southern U.S. flood
Two persons were killed and more than 600 were forced to flee their
homes yesterday in some of the most severe flooding in years in Georgia,
Mississippi and Louisiana.
Meanwhile, a blustery storm dumped up to a foot of snow on the Rockies
and began its assault on the snow-shocked Kansas and Nebraska plains, still
reeling from a weekend storm that included up to 20-foot drifts. Heavy snow
warnings were posted for Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle, and
winter storm warnings extended from Montana to the Dakotas. Nebraska
officials considered sending out the National Guard to western points where
residents were digging out from up to two feet of snow.
Hunt family begins selling
off oil, gas interests
NEW YORK - The Hunt family of Texas, which made its money in oil
and lost hundreds of millions speculating in silver, began selling off its oil
properties yesterday to make up for its silver losses.
Engelhard Minerals and Chemicals Corp. announced that Nelson Hunt
and W. Herbert Hunt agreed to transfer "significant interests in major
Canadian oil and gas properties in the Beaufort Sea" in order to pay off a
silver debt. The Hunts had agreed to buy 19 million ounces of silver
yesterday from Engelhard at a price of about $35 an ounce. In return for
canceling that obligation, Hunt agreed to transfer 8.5 million ounces of silver
and the oil and gas interests to Engelhard.

1

01

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COMFORTABLY- HEAT OR PERSPIRATION'
CONVENIENTLY- WE'RE OPEN 7 DAYS PER
WEYEAR ROUND.PE

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Q U IC KLY TWO HOURS OF SUN.L
SAFELY- PERSOAL TME SCHEDULE

WITH OR WITHOUT A BATHING
PR IVAT ELY- SUIT IN YOUR OWN BOOT H.

1

A GOOD TAN USED TO REQUIRE SPENDING LONG HOURS LAYING IN THE
SUN,WHICH ALSO MEANT LONG HOURS OF EXPOSURE TO CROWDS, HEAT,
AND SUNBURN. AT CALIFORNIA TAN WE ELIMINATE THESE HASSLES.
*BRING THIS AD TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE TRIAL SESSION.
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING
COLONIAL LANES PLAZA 1960 S. INDUSTRIAL HWY., SUITE B ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
*1 IMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER PHONE: (313) 662-3713

DO YOU HAVEAN INTEREST?
IN PHOTOGRAPHY?
-IN GRAPHICS?
-IN BUSINESS?

01Iie 3trbigan ?Datil

-IN WRITIN
If you do, we want
yOU to work for the
191MICHIGANENSIAN.
New Staff Meeting:
Tues., April 8, 7:00 p.m.
at Student Publications

G?
-sa
-f

(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 143
Tuesday, April 1, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
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764.0557: Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764-0550; Composing Room: 764-0556.

I

I

Editor-in-Chief .................... MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor.................MITCH CANTOR
City Editor ..................... PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor.................TOMAS MIRGA
Editorial Page Editors..............JOSHUA PECK
- HOWARD WITT
Magazine Editors ................ ELISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
Arts Editors....................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY'
Sports Editor....................ALAN FANGER
Executive Sports Editors............... EISA FRYE
GARY LEVY
SCOTT LEWIS
NEWS STAFF WRITERS: Arlen Afremaw. Sara

Business Manager.......... ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Soles Manager.................DANIEL WOODS
Operations Manager......... KATHLEEN CULVER
Display Manager.. .. . .KRISTINA PETERSON
Classified Manager SUSAN KLING
Nationals Manager....... ROBERT THOMPSON
Finance Manager. . GREGG HADDAD
Circulation Manager................JAMES PICKETT
Ad Coordinator .............PETE PETERSEN

BUSINESS STAFF: Patricia Barron, Maxwell benolief,
Joseph Brodo,. Courtney Costeel, Randi Cigelink.
Dnna Drebin. Aida Eisenstat. Barbara Forslund, Alisso
Goldfaden. Jeffrey Gotheim. Leslie Graham. Michael
Greeniees. Laurel Groger. Julia Grave. Susan

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