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January 16, 1980 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-16

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Page 10-Wednesdoy, January 16, 1980-The Michigan Daily

6

Media angered by fran's U.S. journalist ban

NEW YORK (AP ) - Media reaction.
was swift to the ruling by the Iranian
Revolutionary Council that all jour-
nalists working for American news
organizations would have to leave the
country.
The order issued yesterday calls for
the correspondents to leave by mid-
night Friday Iranian time (3:30 p.m.
EST).
The heads of leading news
organizations in the United States sent
cables to Abolghassem Sadegh, direc-
tor of foreign press at the Ministry of
:National Guidance, predicting the ac-
tion would deprive the American people
of first-hand accurate reports and

would delay a resolution of the crisis.
"BY EXPELLING the American
press you increase the likelihood that
the bias and distortion you deplore will
increase" said Roone Arledge,
president of ABC News.
"CBS News believes that the ap-
parent order . . . is contrary to widely
accepted freedom of information prin-
ciples to which your country sub-
scribes," said William Leonard,
president of CBS News.
"The AP is chagrined that we must
now report on this story without the fir-
st-hand observations of our own staff
correspondents," said Keith Fuller,
president and general maniager of the

Associated Press.
"WE WILL ALL find ways to con-
tinue to report the basic news develop-
ments, but this is not a worthy sub-
stitute for staff coverage.
"Needless to say, we have tried to
cover this difficult and emotional story
with objectivity."
The Iranian government said the ap-
proximately 100 journalists for
American news organizations, part of a
300-member international press corps,
were being expelled because of what it
called "biased reporting" on events in
Iran.
Roderick Beaton, president of United
Press International, defended coverage

by his Iranian staff, saying it "has been
a model of accuracy and objectivity."
"WE FEEL other American
correspondents have done an equally
accurate job," he said. "The eventual
solution to the differences between the
United States and Iran rests with
diplomats and the leaders of the two
nations, not the journalists being ex-
pelled."
Benjamin Bradlee, executive editor
of the Washington Post, told the AP that

"obviously ... the American public
suffers when information is restricted.
I think the public is going to suffer and
the problem of releasing the hostages is
tougher to solve."
Hal Gulliver, editor of the Atlanta
Constitution, said: "The government of
Iran is an outlaw government with no
one apparently in real control or
authority. The expulsion of American
journalists is no more irrational than
any number of other comments and ac-

tions in Iran over the past several
weeks."
Mort Pye of the Newark, N.J. Star-
Ledger said, "Obviously I think what's
happening in Iran depends on havinm
competent reporters there.. . I think
we have to take anything the Iranian of-
ficials say with a grain of salt."
Arledge of ABC said Iran now risks
the danger of being censured by "every
democratic nation that respects, indeed
demands, a free flow of information."

Iran says U.S. reporters

6

GRAUATI NG

ENGI
Have you considered these factors
you will work?
1. Will the job offer challenge and
responsibility?
2. Will your future employer en-
courage job mobility?
3. Will your future employer en-
courage, support and reward
continued professional educa-
tion?
4. How much choice will you'have
in selecting your work assign-
ment?
d. Big starting salaries are nice -
but what is the salary growth
and promotion potential in the
job?

must leave by midnig
(Continued from Page 1) night that any American journalist
country, but did not set a deadline. The unable to meet the expulsion deadline
National Guidance Ministry told the because of exceptional circumstances
Associated Press yesterday that the would have to appeal personally to the
deadline for leaving the country is mid- National Guidance Ministry by noon
ght Fridayn today to explain his position.
The ranan gvermentof yatolah Los Angeles radio journalist Alex
Ruhollah Khomeini accused the Paen, who delivered an estimated 2.5
American journalists, part of a 300- million Christmas cards to the
member international press corps, of hostages, indicated he would appeal.
"biased reporting" on the Iranian because of the Superbowl professional
situation. football game Sunday. He said that on
It said French, British and West Monday, before the explusion deadline
German journalists and those from was issued, the embassy militants
other countries could stay for the time agreed to let him provide the hostages
being. The non-American journalists, withed t ecoin of the gae
41.Sadegh said, can look at Iran "in a wthaterecU ordn tent amag.fr
more fair way" since the hostages are ionS ata iovernt ntcampa gn for
not their fellow countrymen. sanctions against Iran wasttaken
TEHRAN RADIO announced last yesterday to Brussels, Belgium, where

it Friday
Deputy Secretary of State Warren
Christopher met with members of the
North Atlantic Council.
THE SOVIET NEWS agency Tass
criticized Christopher's talks, saying
they "may lead to a further heightening
of international tensions and to an en-
chancement of military preparations."O
The Western group's meeting on Iran
followed the Soviet veto of a U.N.
Security Council resolution on sap-
ctions Sunday. The Carter ad-
ministration pledged to continue
working for an embargo on all goods to,
Iran, excluding food and medicine, un-
til the hostages are released.
Meanwtime, Geri Joseph, U.S. am-
bassador to the Netherlands, and Ar-
thur Ravine, a State Departmen4
assistant legal advisor, handed a World
Court registrar the brief setting out the
U.S. case against Iran.
The United States, won an interim or-
der frokm the 15-member court Dec. 15,
when the justices called for an im-
mediate release of the hostages.

in determining where

6. Can you afford the cost-of-
living in the area?
At the Naval Weapons tenter we
have given these things a lot of
consideration and believe we
have the answers for you.
Arrange through your placement
office to interview with our repre-
sentative Dan Brown
on January 22 and 23
We think you will like
what you hear.

1

STOREWIDE PANT SALE
STRAIGHT LEGS LEVIS
CORDSDOSH
PAINTERS 20 /EE CEE
BOOTLEG LEE
ALL ALL
PRE-WASHED BIB
PANTS OVERALLS
30%/ Off 20 % Off
Entire Stock of WINTER COATS & VESTS 20% OFF
ALL FLANNEL SHIRTS 20% OFF
COTTON CHAMIOS
SALE ENDS 1-19-80

MSA

0

appoints

If you cannot fit an interview into your schedule, write or call:

VNT OF
w2A POS

C. KAREN ALTIERI
Professional Employment Coordinator
NAVAL WEAPONS CENTER (CODE 09201)
China Lake, CA 93555 - (714) 939-3371

An Equal Opportunity Employer.
These are Career Civil Service Positions.

U.S. Citizenship Required

U=

201 E. Washington at Fourth
Open M-Sat 9-6 994-3572

master chary,
: .

i

OPPORTUNITIES IN MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT
WITH
LEVER BROTHERS
COMPANY!s
ASSIGNMENTS
AVAILABLE IN:
CHEMICAL PROCESSING,
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION,
PROJECT/PLANT, OR"
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
The Hammond Plant, located southeast of Chicago"
is the largest Lever facility and is undergoing major
expansion.
Your manufacturing career at Lever will provide youA
with the opportunity to specialize in process engin-
eering or production supervision, or to be exposed to~
a variety of line and staff assignments in preparation
for general management responsibilities.
Production supervisory responsibilities would span"
processing and/or packing activities in line.produc-
tion including equipment efficiency, work perform-
ance and cost control to insure continuous produc-
tion within established quality and quantity stan-
dards.
Upon joining the company, you will begin on the job
training, which is formalized but allows for custom-
izing. Your initial training will include exposure to
the full range of manufacturing activities including:
Manufacturing Management, Warehousing Pro-
duction services, Plant Engineering, Industrial
Engineering, Finance, Personnel/Industrial
Relations and Quality Control
Through participation in on-going company spon-
sored training and development programs, in addi-
tion to your on-the-job experience, you will build a
variety of skills in management of people and pro-
cesses.
Our company recruiter will be interviewing on Cam-
pus on January 21st.I!
We are looking forward to meeting with you -to
r-,r urmr fitirP emnirnment nnssihilities with

3to 'U'
Cellar board
(Continued from Page.31
sideration during their selection
process.
"It was not my desire to postpone the
appointments," O'Neal said, "but to
realign these appointments with a mind
to affirmative action."
PIC CO-ORINDATOR Bob DiScipio
defended his committee's decision to
support the appointees, saying Barr,
Neumeir, and Markovich were best
qualified for the job. Nine, persn in all
applied for the position, he said, in-
cluding one 24-year-old black woman.
"We based our decision on the ap
plicant's qualifications, enthusiasm
and interest (in the U Cellar),"
DiScipio said. "We alsok felt that the
people we've recommended were
familiar with the organization and had
the most experience."
O'Neal countered DiScipio's remarks
by pointing out that prior experience
and familiarity with organizations hasa
worked against women and minorities
seeking jobs inthe past.
MSA VICE-PRESIDENT LauriU
Tyler argued in favor of the appoin-
tments as did assembly treasurer Brad
Canale. Tyler noted that the U Cellar
board positions had been vacant since
before Christmas and that the Assem-
bly had already postponed a decision on
the matter once before.
"We all know the great history the U
Cellar has had," said Canale. "In no
way are they in good financial health.
The board has to address critical
questions in the near future and the
need to have these positions filled as
soon as possible." The treasurer also
noted that the board's first meeting of
the year is slated for next Monday.

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