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March 30, 1980 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-30

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INTER EST
See editorial page

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See Today for details

Niney Yers of Editorial Freedom

Vol. XC, No. 142

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Sunday, March 30, 1980

Ten Cents

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Annual
By NICK KATSARELAS
See Jane sublet to Dick. See Jane leave town. See
Dick destroy the apartment. See Dick not pay rent.
See landlord sue Jane. See Jane's summer ruined ...
Subletting your apartment or house can be an
onerous task, although it doesn't have to yield such
*astrous consequences.
One of the most important rules to remember about
summer subletting, according to David Calechman of
the Ann Arbor Tenants Union, is "everybody has the
right to sublet their apartment."
BUT EQUALLY important, explained Calechman,
is that the landlord has the right to approve the sub-
tenant. The tenant should arrange a meeting between
the landlord and the prospective sub-tenant.

sublet race is on

Calechman said a landlord cannot unreasonably
refuse a subtenant. Jo Williams, director of the Off-
Campus Housing Office, suggests that the tenant find
out specifically why the landlord objects to a tenant's
choice of subtenants, and "let us do the arguing for
them." Calechman also suggested that tenants con-
tact the Tenants Union or Student Legal Services for
questions or legal help.
After a subtenant is selected, both parties should
understand their obligations. Calechman explained
that the original tenant (also called the primary
tenant) has a responsibility to make sure rent is paid
to the landlord every month. The primary tenant
becomes, in essence, the landlord, and rent can be,
paid either to the primary tenant, or the actual lan-

dlord, depending upon the arrangements worked out
between the parties.
JONATHAN ROSE, director of Student Legal Ser-
vices, said the tenant should refer to his original lease
to find out whether the tenant and subtenant must
sign a sublease. In any case, said Rose, "it's probably
a good idea," that some agreement be signed. bet-
ween the parties.
Rose also suggested that a copy of the original
lease be attached to the sublease, since the subtenant
has the same responsibilities and rights as the first
tenant.
Ifa sublease is to be signed, Williams said some
landlords have their own forms, and added that the
See KEYS, Page 10

Ten Pages plus Supplements
0
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White' House denies
Iranian letter claim

From AP and UPI
Iranian state radio reported yester-
day that President Carter sent a per-
sonal letter to Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini admitting past mistakes in
U.S. foreign policy and calling for an in-
ternational commission to settle the.
U.S.-Iran crisis. The White House
categorically denied the report.
"The president sent no message to
Khomeini," White House press
secretary Jody Powell told reporters.
IN RESPONSE to questions, Powell
said no such message was sent to
Khomeini or any other Iranian official
by any representative of the U.S.
government. He did say Carter is con-
sidering additional steps that could lead
to a solution of the crisis, now nearly
five months old.
Iranian radio said the alleged Carter
message was delivered by the Swiss
ambassador in Tehran, but that was
denied oy the Swiss Foreign Ministry in
Geneva. Ministry spokesman Han-
sjoerg Renk said the Swiss ambassador
to Iran had not been involved in any
Carter-Khomeini message..
Tehran Radio, monitored by the BBC
in London, said Carter had sent a letter
in which he told Khomeini, "My gover-
nment inherited a very sensitive inter-
national situation, which is the result of
other policies and circumstances and
made all of us to commit (sic) mistakes
in the past."
THE SUPPOSED letter said, "We
are ready to accept the new realities
which are consequence (sic) of the
Iranian revolution."
On the subject of the embassy
takeover, the radio quoted Carter as

sa.ying, "I can quite understand that the
occupation of our embassy could have
been an acceptable reaction for Iranian
youths."
The letter said the United States was
"quite innocent" in the shah's move
last Monday to Egypt.
STATE DEPARTMENT officials ex-
pect the White House to decide next
week what steps it will take on the Iran
problem and they say military force is
not a likely possibility.
While the White House has not an-
nounced its plans, U.S. officials have
said privately in recent weeks that
America's options might include:
Imposing an embargo on all trade
with Iran except food and medicine.

* Reducing the number of Iranian.
diplomats in the United States.
" Asking western allies to take
economic measures against Iran and
reduce the size of their diplomatic
missions in Tehran.
In other developments yesterday, a
Tehran newspaper said a man who
killed his five-months pregnant sister to
save his family's "honor" claimed her
unborn child had been fathered by an'
unnamed hostage.
The report in the newspaper Kayhan
said authorities wanted to conduct
blood tests on the hostage to check the
unidentified man's claim.

Colombian guerrillas

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
TWELVE BARS AND STORES were cited by police for selling liquor and beer to minors in a check of 50 local establish-
ments Friday. The Ann Arbor Police Department, in a combined effort with police from surrounding towns, used a
special squad of 17 and 18-year olds to check the bars and stores.
MINORS BUY INTOXICANTS:
'Cos ab lquor violators .

to free 8 h
BOGOTA, Columbia (AP) - The
leader of the guerrillas holding 29
hostages said eight hostages without
diplomatic rank would be released this
week, according to a Roman Catholic
priest who visited the occupied em-
bassy Friday.
The hostages include-19 foreign
diplomats, tWo protocol officers from
the Colombian Foreign Ministry, and
eight private citizens - four Colombian
and four foreign.
THE REV. Javier de Nicolo told
reporters yesterday he thought the

ostages
guerrilla chief meant that the eight
private citizens would be freed and that
the two protocol officers would be held
with the foreign diplomats.
He said he did not know when the
hostages would be set free other than
"during Holy Week." Holy Week is
celebrated in Colombia from midnight
Friday, March 28, to next Sunday,
Easter Day.
The guerrillas, who seized the em-
bassy during a diplomatic reception
Feb. 27, and their 29 hostages began
See COLOMBIAN, Page 2

By LORENZO BENE T
Several campus area establishments
were among the 12 bars and stores cited
by police Friday night for selling in-
toxicants to minors, Ann Arbor Police
Chief Walter Krasny said yesterday.
ccording to Ann Arbor Police Detec-
ive Jerry Reynard, the operation in-
volved sending a special squad of
youths aged either 17 or 18 into the
businesses and having them attempt to
buy intoxicants.
HE SAID if the youths were suc-
cessful in purchasing the liquor, two
plainclothes officers were then sent in
to cite the sellers for liquor law
violations.
*klleged violators will be taken to
urt and the Michigan Liquor Control
Commission will be notified in Lansing,
added Reynard.
He also said it is possible for violators

to have the liquor licenses revoked or
suspended.
POLICE CITED the following Ann
Arbor businesses for the illegal sale of
intoxicants to minors: Bicycle Jim's,
1301 N. University Ave.; Del Rio Bar,
122 W. Washington St.; Thano's Lam-
plighter Restaurant, 421 E. Liberty St.;
Thano's Restaurant, 514 E. Washington
St.; Stadium Restaurant, 338 S. State
St.; The Cottage Inn, 510 E. William
St.; and Manikas Sirloin House, 307 S.
Main St.
Also cited were four establishments
in Ypsilanti and Pittsfield Township.
Four county police agencies - the
Ann Arbor police, Washtenaw County
Sheriff's Dept., Ypsilanti police, and
PitfedTwsi oie prticipated in the operation that netted 12
out of 50 establishments checked.
REYNARD STRESSED that no en-

trapment was involved in the operation.
"We don't have the kids go in and lie
about their age or show a fake I.D.," he
said, "If they are asked about their age
or to show an I.D. they do so."
But according to Jim Chaconas, a

See LOCAL, Page 7

Brown and Coppola
team up in Wisconsin
campaign spectacular

Pursell supports only
mild defense spending

By ARLYN AFREMOW
The federal defense budget should not
be drastically increased-especially if
it's at the expense of social programs,
U.S. Rep. Carl Pursell told a discussion
group at the Michigan Union yesterday.
The Ann Arbor Republican said the
military budget should only be
increased in carefully targeted areas,
"chas naval fleet appropriations.
Pursell acknowledged at the PIRGIM-
sponsored event some social program
cuts may be necessary both to finance
his proposed mild defense increases
and to help balance the budget-a move
he favors as an inflation-fighter.
But such budget cuts hould be made
across the board at department levels,

allowing cabinet members to decide
which specific programs to eliminate or
reduce, Pursell said.
Pursell also said he opposes
President Carter's draft registration
plan, preferring to concentrate funds on
"reserve units rather than draft and
registration."
"The impediment to getting new
troops into combat is training time, not
registration," Pursell said in a news-
release. "Experience indicates that
when our nation is threatened, the
combination of volunteers and draftees
is even greater than our training
capacity."
Pursell said the proposed budget
guidelines are expected to be debated
See PURSELL, Page 7

AP Photo
THREE THOUSAND people gathered at the Wisconsin capital in Madison
to watch California Gov. Edmund Brown's multi-media campaign speech.
Brown teamed up with movie director Francis Ford Copolla to produce
Friday's unusual program.

her supervisor, but TWA hasn't taken any disciplinary
action. No doubt the airline will experience some
turbulence if they pursue the matter further. 0

interest in using the news as fodder for his next film, The
Godfather, Part IV (or The Big Cheese). F1
'Breaker, breaker, let's score'
If you're cruising down U.S. Route 1 or Interstate 95 in
Ellicott City, Md., don't be surprised if you hear some
appeals over your citizens' band radio to make an unusual
sort of detour. Police in that city's county said last week
that prostitutes are trying to lure truckers and motorists off
the road via the airwaves. The police say the hookers
nn- --nn - y r - -n-rctniv' A OnA nn --n - - - - hnn

snow drift and short-circuited, causing the track to
postpone a 12-race program. The incident marked the third
time in a week that weather problems caused cancellation
of racing at the track. Hopefully it won't snow before
Easter.
On the inside
A writer argues that John Anderson is a conservative
on the editorial page . . . the arts page reviews "Old and,
New Dreams" and the music school's production of "The
Coronation of Poppea". . . sports looks at the NCAA hockey
finals and the results of the Michigan baseball double-

Of pepperoni, cheese, bullets
It takes no genius to see that there's a lot of dough in
pizza parlors, but someone is finally trying to take
advantage of it. Mobsters in Pennsylvania have apparently
infiltrated scores of nizza businesses. costing the state

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