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March 29, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-29

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:Page 8-Saturday, March 29, 1980--The Michigan Daily
NCAA HOCKEY:

N. Mic
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP)-Bill'
Joyce's second goal of the game, his
40th of the season, propelled Northern
;Michigan to a 5-4 victory over Cornell
last night and a berth in the finals of the
NCAA hockey tournament.
Northern Michigan, 34-5-1, the No. 2
team in the West, meets North Dakota,
30-5-1, the top-seeded Western club, for
the title tonight.
JOYCE BATTLED down the left side
at 10:52 of the third period with
Cornell's Tim Strawman leaning on
him and shovelled the puck past Big
Red goalie Doug Eliot to break a 3-3 tie.
Don Waddell then iced it for Northern
r Michigan with a goal at 17:43, which
proved to be the winning goal, though
Roy Kerling scored for Cornell with five
seconds left.
Brock Tredway put Cornell in front at
3:27 of the first period, but Walt Kyle, a
transfer student who played for Boston
College in the 1919 tournament, tied it
up for Northern Michigan at 7:53.
Tom Laidlaw's breakaway goal at
2:13 of the second period gave the
tikets for Prei
Inauguration
A lmitd onday, Ap
A limited number of general
Shapiro's Inaugural Ceremor
available for students, facult
attend. The Inauguration will
concert at 2:00 p.m. Both e
torium on Monday, April 14.
Tickets will be available on4
upon presentation of an indiv
kets will be limited to two pe
from the Office of the Regist
from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00.
5:00 p.m. Monday through F
31

igan dumps Cornell, 5-4

v --

Wildcats the lead, and Joyce's first
score on a power play at 5:58, extended
it to 3-1.
Greg Reid scored his first goal in his
first collegiate game for Cornell at 7:17
and Jeff Baikie tied the game at 3-3 with
a 25-footer at 13:38.
North Dakota 4,
Dartmouth 1
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (UPI) - Phil
Sykes had a public apology to make.
"I'd like to apologize to the guys in
the penalty box on my first penalty,"
said Notth Dakota's sophomore wing.
"I was pretty rude to them."
Dartmouth would have liked Sykes to
speak more and play less.
Sykes atoned for his errors by scoring
a pair of goals during a four-goal ex-
plosion Thursday night, lifting North
Dakota to a 4-1 win over Dartmouth and
into the finals of the 33rd NCAA Hockey
Championships.
North Dakota, 30-8-1, will meet the

winner of the other semifinal between
ECAC champion Cornell and CCHA
titlist Northern Michigan.
The two victors meet in tonight's
final.
"I thought the guy had taken a dive,"
said Sykes, who began and ended the
five-minute scoring blitz, his second
tally being a shorthanded, unassisted
effort at 16:16 on a breakaway.
"We hadn't played in a while and I
was not on my game. But the yelling
was kind of out of character," he said.
His scoring, however, was totally in
character.
The ,two goals gave Sykes 21 for the
season. His first tied the game at 11:16
when he drilled a 25-footer from the
right circle low to the far corner off a
feed from senior center Mark Taylor,
the nation's second leading scorer.
North Dakota, which has won its last
13 games, had not played since March
15 after sweeping Notre Dame in the
WCHA playoffs.
And itsshowed, as Dartmouth's Mark
Bedard's rebound goal at 13:08 of the
first period and strong goaltending by
junior Bob Gaudet enabled the Big
Green to maintain a 1-0 lead midway in-
to the third period.

"Our game was off in the first
period," said Fighting Sioux Coach
John Gaspirini. "I don't know if we
were tight, but we were tired and
sluggish. We took control in the second
period and got rid of the jitters. I knew
it was just a matter of time before we
got that first one."
Freshman center Dusty Carroll
scored what proved to be the game
winner 1:07 after Sykes' first. Senior
center Rick Zapearniuk scored at 14:53
on a short backhander before Sykes
finished it off.
"I thought it was a pretty good game
for 51 minutes," said Dartmouth Coach
George Crowe, whose team dropp~ed to
18-11-1 and lost to North Dakota for the
second straight year in the NCAA
semifinals.
"I looked up with nine minutes to play
and started to think we could do it. I
think it would have been different if we
had gotten a second one. We had a
couple of good chances. I think we got
beat by a better team. They're a real
fine team and they deserve it."
North Dakota lost last year's cham-
pionship game to"Minnesota 4-3. The
Fighting Sioux will be shooting for its
third NCAA championship, having won
in 1959 and 1963.

Alan
Fanger
Orr's sensitie .. .

11
t-
'7

I

aI
iand Concert
WrI14, 1980
admission tickets to President
ny and inaugural Concert are
ty and staff who would like to
be held at 10:30 a.m. and the
vents will be held in Hill Audi-
a first-come, first-served basis
vidual's identification card. Tic-
r person and will be distributed
trar, Room 1518, LSA Building,
noon and from 1:00 p.m. until
riday beginning Monday, March

Women ne tters ready
dlespite little practice

...prays for 'Cip-'
M ICHIGAN HAD just beaten Nebraska, 76-69, in the first round of the
National Invitation Tournament, and the writers were eager to hear
the perennial post-game wisdoms of one John Orr.
We expected to see a jubiliant Orr gallop into the 'M' Hospitality Lounge
and extol the virtues of a team which was bound to find the Big Apple.
What we saw (and heard) was a deeply sensitive man, one who put aside
the pleasures of victory for a fleeting moment, and let his heart do the -
talking.
"I talked to 'Cip' (Nebraska coach Joe Cipriano) last night. He's pretty'
sick. I'm very sorry he couldn't make it out here."
A battle against cancer
When a reporter queried Orr as to the nature of Cipriano's illness, Orr
solemnly replied, "He's got cancer."
"I pray for him every night.'
Moments later, as we converged on the Michigan players, I saw tears.,
streak down the cheeks of a writer. Then all at once, I began to cry. Without
any cause for concern among the other writers, I had broken, wihot
reluctance, the unwritten rule which states that members of the media must "
not allow their emotions to overtake their sense of accuracy and objectivity:
Johnny Orr and Joe Cipriano are close friends. Until Orr accepted the >
Iowa State head coaching position Tuesday, both men owned the title of
"dean of coaches" in their respective conferences. Orr had coached at-
Michigan for 12 years, while Cipriano was finishing his 17th year as
Nebraska's head coach.
But Cipriano's 17th season wasn't a season at all. He spent most of the
campaign in a hospital bed, taking chemotherapy and other treatments,
while assistant coach Moe Iba ran the team. Despite his absence, Nebraska
managed to finish second in the Big Eight, and earn a bid to the NIT.,:
Cipriano and Iba were named co-coaches of the year in their conference.
When Orr walked into that press room, you could sense that something
had diluted that pure thrill of victory-you could tell that Orr's concern about
the life of a good friend was allowed to creep into his post-game remarks.
Orr's compassionate concern for his Nebraska colleague is just one
illustration of the man's character-while coaching may indeed behis
formal dedication while coaching is the profession to which lie is formally-
dedicated, his kindness, generosity, and sensitivity are certainly more than
hobby-like.
He 's just a super guy
I vividly remember the Illinois game in Champaign, and the post-game
press conference in which the Michigan coach reacted rather strongly to one
of my questions. Two days later he paid me a sincere apology, something
many coaches would never do. This was Orr at his finest-making sure his
rapport with the press (except Joe Falls) and the public was always positive
in nature.
He returned to Ann Arbor Tuesday following his acceptance of the Iowa
State position, and was in his Michigan office the next day clad in maize and
blue, sporting both a smile and a thick coat of sentimentality for the city he
had grown to love. In twelve years, he had made his mark on the communityA
not just by his regular appearances on bench, but by his charity work, his
many summer camp sessions out at Concordia College, and his devotion to
alumni concerns.
When Johnny Orr packs his belongings and heads for the land of corn, he
will leave more than a successful coaching record in his tracks. It's the
depth of character-the ability to shed the cloak of big-time basketball and
deal with concerns off the court that will make him a significant figure in the
Michigan sports history books.

O~ .
c- SATURDAI
9pm -Iam
NO COVER!I
trlh ouRt
rpa(o
1140 South Universitv

, By KENT WALLEY
Despite not being able to practice for
the last few days, the Michigan
women's tennis team "should not have
too much trouble" with Miami of Ohio
today, according to Coach Oliver
Owens. That is, if they get to play the
match.,
Due to an accidental double booking
of the Track and Tennis Building, an art
fair will be held inside and the match,
weather permitting, will be held on the
outdoor varsity courts.
Due to other difficulties with
scheduling in the Track and Tennis
Building, the team has had little chance
to prepare for this match. However,
Owens is still very optimistic about the
Wolverines' chances today. He figured
that "a couple of matches could be
close, but overall the team should do
well."
Number one singles player Kathy
Karzen (a senior) has lost only one
match. One of her wins was against an
All-American from Clemson. Owens
said that Karzen is "one of the top twen-
ty in the nation."
Junior Sue Weber will be playing
number two singles, and according to
Owens, she had a good year last year
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and is really looking good now.
Other starters today will be senior
Ann Kercher, freshman Robbie Risdon,
sophomore Debbie Klein, and freshman
Daisy Martin.
Even though the team has not been
able to have official practices, they
have been working a lot on their own.
Said Owens, "They're the hardest-
working group of girls of any team
around."
The effects of all this hard work won't
be seen this weekend, but probably next
week when the women's netters will get
a chance to see where they stand in the
Big Ten. They play Wisconsin, Min-
nesota, Northwestern, and Iowa. Owens
said that today's match "is just a
preparatory match for next week." So
if it doesn't rain, the netters will get
some practice even if it will be in a
match.

0

PURDUE NEX T MA TCH

A6

Lacrosse seeks status

By KIM HANAFEE
Lacrosse at Michigan is a club sport,
unlike most other teams. The team con-
sists of both graduates Ind un-
dergraduates, most of whom have been

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with the Lacrosse Club at least two to
three years.
"We do have a lot of young players
and this is going to be a transition kind
of year," said sophomore Tom Shields.
GAINING VARSITY status has been
a team objective and it would be
especially convenient this year, con-
cnsidering, the team's youth, according to
Shields. "The varsity would go down for
a while in the' absence of the older
players:, but we would be able. to
recruit. We have a younger team this
year so it would be practical to go var-
sity because we wouldn't lose as
much."
Shields mentioned that Athletic
Director Don Canham promised they
would be the next team to turn varsity,
but Shields said the soccer club was
given a similar promise by Canham.
"Soccer will probably be the next
team to become varsity," said Shields.
"Canham told us we'd have a bad
record if we went varsity. Also, it costs
money and they (the Athletic'Depar-

-T
tment) don't know if they want to spend
it if they won't get any revenue in
return," said Shields.
"BUT IT would be good forti
game," he added. "It's exciting and it
would get people to watch."
The club used to consistently win the
Midwestern Lacrosse Club Champion-
ships, usually by defeating Notre Dame
for the title. The last three yealrs,
however, the team has lost, but' this
year, its members feel Michigan hias
the strength to come back.
After a Florida training session,S
which the team won two and lost two,
the club prepared to open its season
tonight at 7 p.m. on the Ferry Field tar-
tan turf.
Like most schools the Lacrosse 4ub
is scheduled to play, Purdue is fried
with midwestern natives who ire
relatively new to the game. "Purdi* .
not that good, but Columbus, who 'U
face the next day, is a good team," siid
Shields.'

-IN WRITIN
If you do, we want
you to work for the
1981 MICHIGANENSIAN.
New Staff Meeting:
Tues., April 8, 7:00 p.m.
at Student Publications

IGV

-I

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