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January 16, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-16

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FIRST LAD Y S UPPOR TS NA TIONAL HOLIDA Y

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 16, 1980-Page 7

5,000 march in

ATLANTA (AP) - First Lady
Rosalynn Carter said yesterday that
the president joins her in a renewed
Wominitment to work for a national
holiday honoring the Jan. 15 birthdate
of the late Martin Luther King Jr.
Carter's remarks at a two-hour
memorial service before an overflow
--crowd at Ebenezer Baptist Church
came only hours after the marble front
of King's crypt was defaced during the
night with streaks of red, black, and
green paint.
FOLLOWING THE services, about
,000 people marched one mile through

downtown streets to the state Capitol,
chanting, "We Want a National
Holiday," and waving signs favoring a
national and state holiday in memory of
King, who was assassinated 12 years
ago in Memphis, Tenn.
"When I left Washington this mor-
ning it was a holiday for the school
children there. And you and I and the
president are committed to a national
holiday for Martin Luther King Jr.,"
Carter said.
"Hope, faith, love. That is what we
celebrate today," she said. "We must
have a national holiday to com-

memory
memorate this great man of hope, faith
and love."
TH E PROPOSAL for a national
holiday for King lost twice in the House
last year and failed to make much
progress in the Senate. However, the
date is a holiday in the District of
Columbia.
There were no arrests in the defacing
of the tomb. The Rev. Fred Bennett,
chief of security for the Martin Luther
King Jr. Center for Social Change near
the crypt, said he would not begin an
investigation until after Tuesday's ac-
tivities.
Atlanta Police Maj. W. W. Holley said
it was just vandalism and he believed it
was done by a single individual and not
the work of an organized group.
CARTER LEFT for Washington,
before the march, which was led by
King's widow, Coretta Scott King; for-
mer Peace Corps director 'Sargeant
Shriver; Rabbi Marc Tannenbaum,
director of the American Jewish Com-
mittee; and Atlanta Mayor Maynard
Jackson.

of King
At the Capitol, King urged the crowd
to push for the holiday for her late
husband.
"The job begins when you leave here
today to work through the political
process and framework. We are going
to have a national holiday, and a state
holiday," she said. "Martin marched
with us today and we will keep on mar-
ching."
HELP US
STRIKE OUT
BIRTH DEFECTS
MARCH
OFDMES:
I1

Guerrillas loyal 10
Pol Pot finished'

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) - Guerrillas
A oyal to ousted Cambodian leader Pol
ot are "finished" as a military threat
to the Vietnamese-backed government
in Phnom Penh, a top Hanoi official
said yesterday. But he accused
Thailand of aiding the insurgents in
border areas with U.S. acquiescence.
The United States must intercede to
get the Thais to stop supporting the an-
ti-government Cambodians, Vice
Foreign Minister Phan Hien said.
HIEN, A KEY Vietnamese foreign
policy spokesman granted an interview
to Western journalists accompanying a
group of U.S. congressmen who made a
five-hour trip to Hanoi from Bangkok,
Thailand, to talk with Vietnamese of-
ficials about U.S. servicemen still
missing in action from the Indochina
War.
He said Vietnamese troops in western
Cambodia are carrying out "a, police
operation against gangs, bandits. But
militarily, in an organized way, it (the
"Pol Pot opposition) is finished."
Some 200,000 Vietnamese troops have
occupied Cambodia since they ousted
Pol Pot as premier a yea' ago,
replacing him with Vietnamese-backed
leader Heng Samrin. Both Thai and
Western analysts in recent weeks have
been expecting Vietnamese troops to
mount a dry-season offensive against
the Pol Pot troops scattered along the
border with Thailand.
THAI MILITARY sources have said
that in recent days Vietnamese troop
movements in western Cambodia have
put them in a position to launch such an
offensive whenever they choose. Some
analysts fear a clean-up operation
might spill over into Thai territory.
When asked about the predictions of a
new Vietnamese campaign, Hien said
that because the guerrillas have been
so weakened he would not use the word
"offensive.'"
"Basically the military problem in
Cambodia is solved already," Hien
said. "The problem now is reorganizing
a new society, a society which has been

destroyed."
HE TOLD THE reporters Vietnam
would respect Thailand's borders but in
turn expected Thai officials to end what
he insisted was support for the
guerrillas. In return for Vietnam's
promise to respect Thailand's
neutrality, Hien said, he expected
neutral behavior from Thai officials.
Hien said the United States should
bring pressure on Thailand to stop
aiding Pol Pot forces. "The United
States has some role, some influence,"
hesaid.
Vietnam's defense minister, Gen. Vo
Nguyeh Giap, was quoted in October as
saying the United States and China are
arming remnants of the Pol Pot forces
in an unnamed neighboring country,
apparently Thailand, for an attack on
Cambodia.
IN THE interiorofeCambodia, Hien
said, guerrillas are "no longer a
threat." But across the far western
border with Thailand, they have san-
ctuaries where they receive training,
weapons, ammunition aRd medicine, he
said.
Hien accused Thailand of helping the
guerrillas "sometimes openly,
sometimes they shut their eyes and let
the Khmer Rouge (the guerrillas) do
their job, sometimes they claim the
border line is in one place or another.
"If Thailand will be really neutral,
such sanctuaries must cease."
THE POL POT forces have been
waging their guerrilla campaign along
the Thai border, sometimes moving
back across it for a rest. They hiye
refused to lay down their arms and join
the tens of thousands of Cambodian
refugees who have flowed into Thailand
as a result of the continued fighting and
a vast shortage of food in Cambodia.
Vietnam has questioned the
neutrality of Thailand, which still
recognizes the Pol Pot government,
because it has allowed the ousted
regime's deputy premier, Teng Sary,
and other officials to pass back and for-
th through Thai territory.

,3
Ulrich 's:
The Source.
-.
i 4
E ;
-T

r

r

The University of Michigan
Center for Japanese Studies &
Department of Far Eastern Languages
and Literatures
PUBLIC LECTURE

WI-'

TOKYO /N THE MElTPERIOD"
EDWARD G. SEIDENSTICKER
Professor of Japanese Literature
Columbia University
Thursday, ianmr y 17,1980-4-5 pm
200 L~ade 1Hall, Washigton and State streets

A /

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St n y January 20
Advance tickets Available At: Schoolkids, Discount Records
(South U. & State St.) Wherehoyse Records (Ypsilanti & Ann Ar-
bor), Recordland Briarwood & Second Chance
5lG .19Dbcrlq§4zn§4rbor $10.00 994-535

Art & Engineering Supplies
Reference & Professional Books
Stationery & Office Supplies
Prints & Frames
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Textbooks
Calculators
If you can buy an item cheaper elsewhere,
Ulrich's will match the deal
or refund your money.

l

Hood to challenge Diggs
for Detroit House seat

ss
MORE THAN A BOOKSTORE

I

_

DETROIT (UPI) - The Rev.
Nicholas Hood III announced his can-
didacy yesterday for the 13th
Congressional District seat now held by
Charles Diggs, the veteran Detroit
Democrat convicted in a payroll pad-
ding scandal.
Hood, 28, will enter the August
Democratic primary in what district of-
-icials consider the first 'serious
political challenge in memory Diggs
has faced from within his own party.
HOOD, SON of city councilman
Nicholas Hood Jr., said Diggs' legal
problems were "not really" a factor in
his decision to challenge the 13-term
lawmaker.
"I've been thinking about running for
Congress all of my life," he told a news
conference at Plymouth United Church
Of Christ, where he is associate
minister. "And that's the truth."
Hood said he did not plan to make a
campaign issue out of Diggs' convic-
tion, noting "the courts will take care of
whatever legal problems he has.
"I think that the community is very

well aware of his situation," Hood said.
"I think that people want to hear con-
structive issues. I don't think that they
want to deal in negative personalities."
Hood, however, said one reason he
decided to seek the congressional post
was to counter the growing disenchan-
tment with politics" among voters who
"feel as though our political process is
corrupt."
Uof M Stylists
meet:
DaveTed& Chet
open mon-sat
8:30am - 51pm
at the Union
_________________________________ -I

50

549 East University

662-3201

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on.

qII I.

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;F FalafilIPalace
Flyer
NOW SERVING BREAKFAST
COFFEE-1OC acup
through the month of

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January during breakfast hrs.:

1

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