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March 26, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-26

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 26, 1980-Page 3
Committee passes bill
preventing contracts
with NLRA violators

SmBDaily Photo by PETER SERNG
Smie, Bossie!
It's hard to be cheery when the weather is gloomy, but these cows in a field near Ann Arbor managed to pose nicely for the
camera. They are reportedly as anxious for warm spring weather as humans are.
H EW DOES ROUTINE INSPECTION:
MSU sex' bias checked

*EAST LANSING (UPI) - The
Department of Health, Education and
Welfare is reviewing Michigan State
University's (MSU) compliance with
rules banning sex bias in graduate and
undergraduate academic programs, it
was announced yesterday.
An MSU spokesman said the school
already has provided "a truckload" of
materials to the HEW regional office in
Chicago, and a five-member team of
IEW investigators is expected on cam-
s next week to interview students and
Ahers.
SPOKESMEN FOR MSU and HEW
described the review as strictly routine
and said it was not triggered by any in-
cident at the school or complaint.
"We are mandated by legislation to
conduct periodic reviews of recipients
of federal assistance to determine
compliance," said Paul Turner, a
federal civil rights official in Chicago.
MSU is one of about 80 schools across
e country undergoing review this

By JULIE SELBST
The state House Labor Committee
recently approved a bill prohibiting the
state from entering into contracts with
companies convicted of National Labor
Relations Act violations more than
three times in any five year period.
The move, which relfects growing
pro-labor sentiment in the state, puts
Michigan on the national bandwagon in
a boycott of the J. P. Stevens Company.
The South Carolina textile firm is the
only corporation which exceeds the
three labor violations limit.
THE STATE "joined the national
boycott to convince the J. P. Stevens
Company to see the error of its ways,"
acording to Dan Sharp, aide to Rep.
Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor), the bill's
sponsor.
Several other states, including Ohio,
Connecticut, California, Maryland, and
Maine have adopted, either by ad-
ministrative or legislative action,
resolutions to boycott the company.
The bill has 17 co-sponsors and strong
bipartisan support. The current spon-
sors plan to invite additional co-
sponsors.
"We're expecting to end up with
about 80 co-sponsors," Sharp said.
THE BILL IS expected to be passed
by the House April 17, which is "Big
Business Day" in Lansing, Sharp said.
The state purchases articles such as
towels, linens, carpeting, and other tex-
tile products produced by the J. P.
Stevens Company for use in state men-
tal health facilities and offices.
Sharp said, "It appears that J. P.
Stevens isn't doing much contracting
with the state, but they're on all the bid
orders. That means it's possible that
the state could be forced to contract
with them if they were the lowest bid-
der, unless the resolution is adopted."
THE BILL also prohibits the state
from subcontracting from these com-
panies.
But presently, upholstery and
material made by J. P. Stevens Co. are
in the Ford Motor Company and
LIKE TO TRAVEL BUT
DON'T HAVE $$ ?
Join the FRIENDS INTERNATIONAL
CO-OP to meet foreign students and
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Great international cuisine! See our
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year for compliance with the federal
Title IX sex-bias guidelines, he said.
"My guess is yes," MSU spokesmen
Dale Arnold said when asked if school
officials expect to pass inspection in the
investigation.
MSU PRESIDENT Cecil Mackey was
informed of the HEW investigation
March 6.
HEW sent the school a letter asking
nearly 100 questions concerning all
phases of undergraduate, graduate and
professional school programs.
The probe does not cover compliance
with Title IX regulations relating to
athletics.
Arnold said Mackey will have only
limited cdmment on the probe until it is
completed, noting it could result in ac-
tion against the university if violations
are found.
THE FIVE-MEMBER team will con-
duct confidential interviews, with
students and others and MSU officials
have been warned not to intimidate

those wishing to provide information.
Academic issues being reviewed in-
clude admissions, recruitment, support
services, extracurricular activities and
selection of graduate research and
teaching assistants. Schools which
traditionally have been male or female
dominated will come under special
scrutiny, officials said.
He said MSU is one of several
Michigan institutions which have un-
dergone similar "compliance reviews"
in recent years.
Youplaythe
leasding role
in our fight against
suppt birth defects
ARCHLOF DIM E

Chrysler Corporation automobiles pur-
chased by the state for police vehicles,
Sharp explained.
According to Diane Pattinson,
legislative coordinator for the State
Department of Labor, Chrysler Cor-
poration has asked the effective date of
the subletting clause be delayed until
Jan. 1, 1982 to allow the auto company
time to find another contractor.
The J. P. StevensCompany employs
nearly 44,000 workers at 82 manufac-
turing facilities. During the past 14
years the firm has been involved in
more than 1,200 violations of the
National Labor Relations Act.

Awl&

r
>:

People are fanaticr when it comes to their Pilot Razor Point pens.
They're reluctant to give them up. And when someone borrows one,
what happens is inevitable,
First, theylove the way it writes. Really smooth and extra-fine. They
go wild over its clever metal collar that helps keep the point from going
squish. Naturally they "forget" to give it back, although it's only 79g.
This can be very embarrassing when they're caught in the act.
Others have pocketed Pilot's Fineliner pen, The one with the slghtly
less delicate stroke. It's only 690
So if you borrow someone's Razor
Point or Fineliner pen
you'd better
be prepared
to paythe
consequences.
But, for much less than a
dollar, you'd be smart
to buy your own.
More than just something to write wilh.

s
1

FILMS

Romance Languages-Mihai Viteazul: Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Scarface: Old Arch. Aud., 7, 9:05 p.m.
Matkade German House-Kleider Machen Leute: 603 Oxford, 8 p.m.
AAFC-Hour of the Wolf: MLB 3,9:30 plm.
MEETINGS
International Center-Intl. Travel Series, "Bon Voyage!": Intl. Ctr. Rec.
Rm., noon.
School of Education-Cross-campus transfer information meeting (secon-
dary education), Whitney Auditorium, 1309 SEB, 2 p.m.
Career Planning and Placement-"Alternative Careers for History
Majors": Lec. Rm. 2, MLB, 4 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Analytical Seminar-Charles Scheidt, "Optical Emission Spectroscopy of
Uniform Aerosol Droplets in a Hybrid Flame-arc Excitation Source," Room
1200 Chem Bldg, 4 p.m.
Environmental Law Society-Joe Stroud, "The Pleasant Peninsulas:
Enhancing our Environment," 138 Hutchins Hall, noon.
Resource Policy and Management- Samual P. Hays, "From Conser-
vation to Environment," 1202 School of Education, 11 a.m.
Public Health Student Assoc.-Julie Coldren, "Update of the Nestle
Boycott," M1112 SPH II, noon.
Ctr. for Afroamerican and African Studies-Obika Gray, "Post-
Independence Radicalism in Jamaica," 246 Lorch Hall, noon.
Continuing Education-Ellyn K. Heimforth, "SNAP Support System,"
Dean's Conference Room, School of Ed., 11:45 a.m.
Computing Center-"Using MTS Sigfiles," 1011 NUBS, 12:10 p.m.
Dharma Study Group-Tape of a talk by Choyam Trungpa, rinpoche:
"Mindfulness and Awareness," 215 E. Kingsley, 7:30 p.m.
Hillel-Rabbi Michael Balinsky, "Laws of Passover," 1429 Hill St., 8:30
p.m.
Laurie Rutenberg, "The Haggadah and How to Conduct a Sedar," 1429
Hill, 8:30 p.m.
Dept. of Romance Languages and Literatures-Ernst Pulgram,
"Language History: Hindsight and Foresight," Rackham Amphitheatre,
S 4:10p.m.
PIRGIM-Bob O'Leary, "Administrative Rules," Mich. Union,7 p.m.
Ecumenical Campus Center-Rev. Benjamin Wu, "Is the Gospel Good
News jn Asia?" 921 Church, 7:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Theatre and Drama-"The Master Builder," ;Trueblood Theatre,8 p.m.
English-Poetry readings by Hale Chatfield. Pendleton Arts Center,
11i1 rn Mitr. n Q rr

aA

Old and New Dreams
March. 28, Michigan Union

In Concert

Records and Tapes
available at

"Old And New Dreams is
former Ornette Coleman
sidemen Don Cherry, Dewey
Redman, Charlie Haden and
Ed Blackwell. With this LP
they established a strong
identity of their own." (Palmer)
Also available on ECM records: Magico ..
Charlie Haden/Jan Garbarek/
Egberto Gismonti (ECM-1-1151)

Charlie Haden Ed Blackwell

Don Cherry Dewey Redman

Voted:
Rolling Stone: Jazz Album of the Year (Robert Palmer)
New York Times: Top Ten Albums (Robert Palmer)
Village Voice: Top 100 Albums of the 70s (Gary Giddins)
: Musician: Underrated Jazz Artist-Charlie Haden (3rd

dCG AAM' NN j?~A£ Dd '$P.M'y DMW£)ROqA,,, iUTMR P4E. I6E U SN
...y ,. ^ , .

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