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March 25, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-25

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 25, 1980-Page 3
New student literary magazine
makes its appearance this week

By GEOFFREY OLANS
Aspiring literary giants on campus
who have had difficulty publishing their
works locally can take heart. A new
student publication featuring various
forms of literary composition releases
its first issue this week - the third such
debut in recent months.
Called the "Contemporary Fiction
Review," the new magazine is
managed by 16 undergraduate students
and features various works, including
short fiction, poetry, and numerous
illustrations and graphics.
ACCORDING TO Sandy'Athans, the
magazine's executive editor, the
Review "will allow students to compare
their writings with that of their peers,
and at the same time provide a unique
opportunity for art students to display
their talents as well."
While there are other literary
magazines on campus, "none are
specifically geared for short fiction,"
like the Review, according to John
Wojewidka, the managing editor of the
journal.
Athans and Wojewidka stressed that
the magazine will place great emphasis,
on structure and layout. They said that

this would, distinguish it from other
student publications.
ATHANS AND Wojewidka mentioned
that the idea to create the Review was
met with a surprisingly mixed reaction
in the English Department. "While
some professors encouraged us, there
were others who weren't at all suppor-
tive," Athans said.
The second issue of the journal will
not be available until mid-April, accor-
ding to Athans. She said the magazine
will be published on a bi-monthly basis
beginning in September.
The editors said the publication will
be "totally self-sufficient" and financed
by revenue from sales and adver-
tisements. Copies of the debut issue are
currently on sale locally for 25 cents per
copy.
Wojewidka explained that the low
selling price was designed to make the
magazine affordable to the average
student. He said this was necessary to
avoid the fatal miptake of the Review's
defunct predecessor, The Gerbil, which
he said "tried to be too fancy and over-
priced itself."
The two editors also said that they ex-
tend a "standing invitation""'to all
students to submit their work.AgThe
submission box is in the Hopwood Room
on the first floor of Angel Hall.

Damj Photo by JIM KRUZ _
Unhappy landing
This 1973 Chevy pickup truck ended up on the front lawn of the house at 219 N. State yesterday afternoon after
apparently being struck by another automobile, according to city police officers on the scene. A four-year-old boy was
trapped in the truck for a short time but escaped the accident with only minor injuries.

MSA may spend $15,000 on Fishbowl

(Continued from Page 1)
*han nine per cent in the 1980-81 school
year, and;
" The University's justification for
renovating the area despite the reser-
vations of students, faculty members,
and administrators who say other
renovation projects on University
property deserve immediate attention.
MSA ACADEMIC Affairs Coor-
dinator Marc Breakstone said he has
not yet decided whether or not to sup-
port the proposal, but has some doubts
1 bout using MSA money to fund what he
aid should be a University project.
r. }' 2: :} ".i.' f, ,t }::{ fs't;."." aKA : . ''X .:..:7 . .

"Students won't be able to take a
piece of the Fishbowl with them when
they leave (the University),"
Breakstone said. "I'm not so sure the
students need it. I like the Fishbowl the
way it is."
Canale and Adams said the MSA ex-
penditure is justified because the Fish-
bowl is an important area for students.
"THE BENEFITS (of renovation),"
Canale said, "are going to far exceed
the cost. There are gross, gross
problems with the Fishbowl now."
Canale cited inadequate coffee and
doughnut facilities, uncontrolled

posting, and "the pitty atmosphere" as
some of the major problems with the
Fishbowl.
"The Michigan Student Assembly
serves student organizations. This area
is designed to serve students by
providing an information center,"
Canale said.
"THE MAIN thrust is that the studen-
ts and the administration are working
together," Canale added.
Adams added, "I don't think that
either of these two parties (the Univer-
sity and MSA) would have done the
project on their own."
"We're making it more of a student
center," Adams continued. He said the
changes would make the atmosphere
more relaxing, and keep posted infor-
mation more consistent and up-to-date.

MSA PRESIDENT Jim Alland said
he supports the renovation project. "I
think it's significant that MSA is ap-
proaching some major projects that
will make important changes in student
life," he said.
Alland said the Fishbowl project, if
approved, will set an important
precedent in terms of cooperation bet-
ween students and administration.
"This is not a renovation that is really
needed in a time of budget crunch,"
Alland said, "but I think the amount of
money going in is not that significant
over a long period of time."
HE SAID students should be able to
regain much of the investment in the
long run through money gained from
events advertised in Fishbowl posters
and from Fishbowl bake sales.

The Eighteenth Canuly Senester Presents:
"PRINT CULTURE and
ENLIGHTENMENT THOUGHT"
PROFESSOR ELIZABETH EISENSTEIN
Department of History, University of Michigan
TUESDAY, MARCH 25-4:00 p.m.
CLEMENTS LIBRARY

7

Rental agencies still show
many vacancies for the fal

abortion?
Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
ConfidentialCounseling
y Complete Birth Control Clinic
k >Medicaid.* Blue Cross
. 3-1810 Ann Arbor and
(33)41Downriver area
(313) 559-0590 Southfield ar
Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc.

Cinema Guild-Polish Film Series, Spiral, 7 p.m.; Death of a President,
9:059:05 pnr., Old Arch. Aud.
AAFC-Red Desert, 7 p.m.; Blow Up, 9 p.m.; Nat. Sci. Aud.
School of Music,, Dept. of Dance-Quarry, an opera in three move-
ments, 7:30 p.m., Dance ,Building, 1310 N. University Court, Studio A.
MEETINGS
PIRGIM-Energy Task Force meeting, 7 p.m., Union; Anti-Draft Task
Force meeting, 7 p.m., Union.
American Association of University Professors-Chapter Meet ing,
noon, Michigan League Conference Rooms 4 and 5.
SPEAKERS
International Center-Ruth Cadwallader, "Today's Vietnam," noon
luncheon, International Center, Union.
Resource Policy & Mgmt.-Bunyan Bryant, "Environmental Advocacy
for the 1980's," noon, 1028 Dana.
Public Health Stud. Assoc.-Sharon Greenwood, "Health Needs of
Women in Nepal," noon, M1112 SPH II.
PAC Guild House-Ben RamireZ/Skwagnaabi, "Cultural
Confrontations on Campus: Minority Group Experiences," noon, 802
Monroe.
Ctr. for Chinese Studies-James Crump, "The Life and Songs of Chang
Yang-Hao (1269-1329)," noon, Lane Hall Commons-Room.
Finley Carpenter Lecture-Ronald Lippitt, "Quest for Quality in
Educational Practice: Linking Knowledge to Practice, Education to
Community Resources, and University to Educational Community,' 4 p.m.,
Schorling Aud., Sch. of Ed.
Great Lakes & Marine Environ.-David Schindler, "Whole Lake
Experiments," 4p.m., 165 Chrysler Ctr.
Ctr. for Russian & E. Eur. Stud.-Igor Hajek, "Ondra Lysohorsky:
Stalin's Poet of a New Nation," 4 p.m., Commons room, MLB, 4 p.m.
18th C. Semester-Elizabeth Eisenstein, "Print Culture and
Enlightenment Thought," 4 p.m., Clements Library.
Chemistry-Vicki Cooper, "NMR Spectroscopy of Metal Nuclei," 4
p.m., 1200 Chem.
Bioengineering-Jerry _Schultz, "Molecular and Cellular Control in
Biology: Engineering Ioplications," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Eng.
Geological Sci.-Robert H. Shaver, "The Trouble with the Silurian:
American Style, 4 p.m., 4001 C. C. Little.
Hillel-Carol Rittner, "The Holocaust: Humanity's Shame," 7:30 p.m.
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Resource Policy & Mgmt.-Samuel P. Hays, "Public Values & Resource
Management: A Case of Cultural Lag," 7:30 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Res. College-Beverly House, "Changing Trends Among Blacks,
Women, Young People: Individual and Social Elements of Suicide," 7:30
p.m.. 126 E. Quad.
Eckankar-discussion of Key to Secret Worlds, 8 p.m., Room B, League.
MI Map Society-John Wolter, "The Emerging Discipline of
Cargography," 8 p.m., Bentley Library.
PERFORMANCES
Major Events-ZZ Top, Crisler Arena, 8 p.m.
EXHIBITS
Museum of Art-"American Photographys: Gifts from the collection of
Marvin Felheim," and "Fifteen Photographs: A Purchase Exhibition," 9
a.m.-5 p.m.
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology-"The Art of the Ancient Weaver:
Textiles from Egypt (4th-12th century A.D)," 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Clements Library-"Childhood in Early America," 9 a.m.-noon, 1-5 p.m.
Exhibit Museum-"Indians of the Great Lakes Region," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Ctr.-Paintings by John Guthrie, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Union Art Gallery-"Group exhibition of graduates from the U-M MFA

3

(Continued from Page 1)

time during the summer (to find a place
to live)."
Alternatives to units in houses and
apartment buildings include frater-
nity, sorority, and cooperative units.
Williams said that though the number
of available spots in individual houses
would not be known until late April,
less than 10 per cent of fraternity
housing units (about 25 spots) would be
available for non-members. Williams
said even fewer units would be
available in sororities.
GIGI BOSCH, member coordinator of
the Inter-Cooperative Council, said
"lots of places are open" in
cooperatives.
She added that co-ops on North Cam-
pus are "wide open," as are some of the
co-ops on the main campus. She ex-
plained that, unlike the housing rush for
apartments and houses, units in
cooperatives "fill up gradually."
Bosch warned that if a student is in-
terested in living in a co-op, he or she
should sign a lease before the end of
April. She said that at the end of
August, there are usually still places
available "on North Campus for men
and women, and on (the) main campus

for women."
The Off-Campus Housing Office,
located on the main floor of the Student
Activities Building, maintains lists of
names and numbers of those people
who are interested in a roommate or
places to live. In the office, there are
up-to-date lists for the number and type
of units available with the larger rental
agencies in the city.
7P
THESES - DISSERTATIONS
COVER LETTERS
REPORTS
SOFT COVER BINDING
24-HOUR TURN AROUND
THE TYPING POOL
612 SOUTH FOREST
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
(313) 6659843
OFFICE HOURS
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
10:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

G RADUATED
NURSES
CONGRA7UlATIONS
CLASS OF '80
As you graduate and
embark on your long-await-
ed nursing career, you owe
it to yourself to find out
about the opportunities
that are available for you at
Hurley Medical Center.
Hurley is a medical center
offering much more than
just general care for it's
patients. Besides the basic
services one would expect,
Hurley serves the area with
many highly specialized
programs. Orientation for
new employees is a
minifmum of 6 weeks. The
lehgth of the program is
determined by the adapt-
ability of the individual.
Hurley offers competitive
wages and an excellent
benefit package. For more
information, contact:

2-j

Reading and Discussion
by Pulitzer Prize Winning Poet
Maxine Kumin
Author: TO MAKE A PRAIRIE
UP COUNTRY
MARCH 28 FREE/8:00 p.m.,
PENDLETON CENTER, Michigan Union
Sponsored by: UM ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
MICHIGAN COUNCIL FOR THE HUMANITIES

BOARD FOR
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
ELECTIONS
(Held with MSA Elections)
ONE STUDENT MEMBERSHIP OPEN

Nurse Recruitment
HURLEY
MEDICAL CENTER
One Hurley Plaza
Flint, MI 48502

I I

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