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March 23, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-23

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4

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 23, 1980-Page 7
Investigator expects

1I

more Klan
WASHINGTON (AP)-A longtime
Anti-Defamation League investigator
predicts an increase in violence this
spring and summer as a growing and
heavily armed Ku Klux Klan plans
stepped-up activities.
Irwin Suall, who recently was called
in by the U.S. Civil Rights Commission
to give a private briefing on Klan
activities, said he foresees four types of
violence:
" Clashes with new, militant leftist
groups;
" Attacks on black civil rights
workers;
* Random violence against minority
group leaders; and,
" Isolated terrorist incidents like
cross-burnings by individuals
mimicking Klan tactics.
SUALL CALLED for better law
enforcement intelligence to avert such
incidents as the slayings last November
of five Communist Workers Party
members in Greensboro, N.C.
Fourteen Klansmen and Nazis have
been indicted in connection with the
Greensboro shootings.
Suall warned particularly of
potential danger in a planned April 19
Klan and Nazi rally in Raleigh, N.C., in
support of the defendants in the
Greensboro case.
HE EXPRESSED similar concern

violence
over the plans of the New York City-
based Committee Against Racism, an
affiliate of the far-left Progressive
Labor Party, to demonstrate May 3
outside the headquarters of the Texas
Klan in Pasadena, Tex.
Suall, head of the fact-finding
department of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, a national
Jewish organization, was called in last
Tuesday to present his findings to the
Civil Rights Comrpission.
The league has been monitoring Klan
activities since 1915 when Leo Frank,
the president of the Atlanta B'nai B'rith
Lodge was lynched. Suall has been in
charge of that effort since 1967.
IN AN INTERVIEW with the
Associated Press, he recounted what he
told the commission.
Suall cited four reasons for the
increased potential for violence,
including the Klan's new membership
gains, the season, rivalry among
competing Klans, and decisions .by
some Klans and far left groups to seek
out confrontation.
Meantime, he said the Klan is
growing from a low-point of 6,500
members in 1975 to an estimated 10,000
members in four major and some
isolated Klan organizations.

p.'

r

A oto
HEAVY RAIN in the Northeast left many motorists and homeowners stranded 20 in Westfield, Massachusetts where the Westfield river overflowed its banks.
yesterday. Above, Massachusetts resident George Herzig plows through Route
Five die in violent storms on east coast

MINORITY STUDENT SERVICES presents:
ETHNIC THEATER FESTIVAL
SATURDAY, SUNDAY,
MARCH22 MARCH23
tVa Gray Word and
Pt h e u u b a w o r k s h o p E cQb w k

From the Associated Press
The newborn spring threw a tantrum yesterday,
assaulting the Northeast with roof-ripping winds,
heavy snows, and driving rains that built the worst
floods in 25 years in some areas.
Communities were awash across New York and
New England, where up to nine inches of rain fell.
Many bridges were gone, and water was waist
deep across some roads and highways. Hundreds
of families abandoned their homes, while others
were isolated.
At least five persons were killed in weather-
related accidents Friday and yesterday. They in-
cluded a 26-year-old Maryland woman blown into
the path of an oncoming car in the suburbs of
Washington, where winds were clocked at more
than 60 mph.
WHILE GALE-FORCE winds pounded the

Eastern states from Virginia to New England, two
feet of snow was dumped in parts of western New
York State near Buffalo, and the Massachusetts
hilltowns of Savoy and.Windsor got up to 12 inches.
"We've got people stranded all over the place,"
said Sheriff Thomas Mayone of Ulster County,
N.Y., one of the regions under a state of emergen-
cy. "It's a heck of a mess."
The town of Middleburgh in Schoharie County,
N.Y. was cut off from the outside world as floods
blocked two state highways. But many of the
residents had been evacuated Friday when the
creeks started to rise.
ALL ROADS in Kingston, N.Y., were closed and
60 to 80 families were evacuated. Also hard hit by
flash floods were the New York towns of Wood-
stock, Saugerties, New Paltz and Shandaken.
The National Weather Service said the flooding

in parts of New York and New England was the
worst since 1965, the year of the last major flood in
the Northeast. The town of Tannersville in
southeastern New York state had received 9 in-
ches of rain since Friday morning.
In Massachusetts, where the Westfield River
surged over its banks after 3 inches of rain fell,
Westfield Police Chief Gerald O'Connor also said
the water was the highest it has been in his city
since the 1955 flood.
Students attending a dance at a high school in
Huntington, Mass., found their routes home
blocked by water. While state police led some of
them home in a convoy, 23 students and a dozen
adults spent the night in the school. At 3 a.m. they
were playing basketball in the gym.
Massachusetts police closed several.stretches of
U.S. Route 20 between West Springfield and the
Berkshires hilltown of Becket.

8:00 p.m.
Mendelssohn Theater
Workshop 9:30-11:30
Room 124 E. Quad
Students with I.D. $2.00
General Public $3.00
-Children under 12 admitted free

8:00 p.m.
Mendelssohn Theater
Children's performance
Mendelssohn Theater 2 p.m
Tickets available at Ticket
Central, Michigan Union
For more information: 764-5418

=Mod

SOCIAL SECURITY TAX CUT COULD RESULT:

Byrd wants to surpass a balanced budget

INTERVIWS FOR STAFF POSIMONS
AT
NEW CAMP FARDAND
"A CAMP THAT BuItDS MENCHEN"
This is the NEW CAMP 120 acres of rolling, wood-
FARDAND -0a ed hills, surround-
Jewish camp for ed' by thousands of
the 80's; scenically acres of state land
located in the beau- and Oiozens of clear.
tiful Wat>edoo Rec- beautiful lakes.
reation area, on
Our facilities are second to none-riding, sailing, sports, new waterfront,
woodlore, camping, canoeing, and wilderness experience. At camp we learn
about our. Jewish heritage by studying religion, history, and culture.
HIGH PAYING SUMMER JOBS WITH A PROFESSIONAL
STAFF TO PROVIDE TRAINING.
For interviews starting Monday, March 24
call 764-7456 or 663-4471

WASHINGTON (AP) - Senate
Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-W.
Va. ), raised the possibility of a 1981 tax
cut yesterday and called it "a very good
incentive" for Congress to go beyond a
balanced budget and achieve a federal
surplus.
Byrd said Congress' main task now is
to cut federal spending enough to
balance the fiscal 1981 budget as a step
toward reducing severe inflation.
A surplus, if any, could be used to
.'Violent'
shoe display
epapered in
protest
By NICK KATSARELAS
Two women, protesting what they
called the "violent" window display at
the Roots shoe store on State Street,
last night covered the window with
newspaper and posted a sign on top of
the window, reading "How does violen-
ce sell shoes?"
"We just think someone should object
to this kind of advertising," explained
Jenny Hoff, a freshwoman from Bur-
sley.
The window front displayed green toy
soldiers fighting each other, some
splashed with red paint. A woman's
arm is tied with rope, and toy soldiers
floated in vials of red blood-like liquid.
Machine guns and shoes hung from
white rope in front of a backdrop of
white torn paper, upon which was
sprayed in red paint, "Ruff & Ready."
"It's things like this that encourage
rapes, and violence against people,"
said Sheila Lummis, also a freshwoman
from Bursley.
AS THE women completed

hold off a scheduled Social Security tax
increase, he said, and that incentive
"should encourage us to make cuts -
even though those-cuts may hurt all of
us."
Reacting to reports of steadily clim-
bing prices, President Carter and
numerous members of Congress have
called for a balanced federal budget.
But that wold require substantial cuts
in various programs and Byrd said,
"We're already being barraged by
special interest groups" fighting reduc-
tions.
"I hope the American people will do
some lobbying, too," Byrd said.
If Congress votes deep enough cuts,
he said, "a surplus is possible."
And if it can be achieved in the fiscal
year that begins October 1, the surplus

money could be. used to hold back the
one per cent increase in the Social
Security payroll tax that is scheduled to
take effect next January, he said.
Revenue from that tax increase -
about $10.7 billion - is about the same
as the anticipated revenue from Car-
ter's proposed new fee on imported oil,
but Byrd said no direct relationship
should be drawn between the two.
"The most important thing is to get
inflation under control, and we're at-
tempting to start to do that with a
balanced budget," he said.
Byrd said he will oppose one budget-
balancing effort - a resolution
scheduled to come to the Senate floor
this week with the backing of Sen. Bill
Roth (R-Del.) and more than 40
colleagues.

t
t

The proposal, which would tie federal
spending to the gross national product,
is "an attractive idea but unworkable"
because it would require impossibly
deep cuts in existing programs, Byrd
said.
Democratic leaders will counter with
a substitute proposal that will call for a
balanced budget and also seek to defuse
the Roth measure by spelling out just
how badly Roth-resolution cuts would
hurt government programs; he said.

KEN GOLDSMITH, M.D.
Executive Director

GARY BASS, Ph.D.
interviewer

._. ...

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WANNASUBLET YOURIEA.
rrr4R 4
The Time, has Come for ?trQ,4 4rb
you to place an ad in rv
*a I
UMMER
UBLET
U PPLEMENT
I NAME (Actual size of ad)
Please print or type legibly In the
ADDR ESSspace provided, as you would like
H the copy to appear.
.P.ONE cost is $12.00)
I = . aI I .1_ -a 144 1 1 ^A h r% A 11 V

A Lenten Seminar on Conditions In, Alternatives
For, and Christian Responses To Incarceration
GABRIEL RICHARD CENTER
Next To St. Mary's Student Chapel
331 Thompson St., Ann Arbor
Monday, March 24, 7:00 P.M.
TOPIC: Alternatives To Lockup
SPEAKER: Marc Mauer, American Friends Service Committee,

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