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March 20, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-20

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Cleveland

desegregates 9

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 20, 1980-Page 5
junior highs

CLEVELAND (AP) - There were
long waits for buses and a few scattered
incidents of minor violence, but Ohio's
largest school district was generally
peaceful yesterday as Cleveland
desegregated 19 junior high schools.
Genevieve Pilarowsky, whose son
Mike, 13, waited for more than nine
minutes for a bus to an east side school,
was one mother who was upset.
"THIS IS quality education.
Everybody's ready for school but there
are no buses," she said.
The rear window of an empty school
bus was shattered, three students were
arrested for attacking a teacher, and
another student ws shot in the hand in
separate incidents as integration of the
city's schools moved into another
phase. There was no indication the in-
cidents were racially motivated.
A shortage of buses, mechanical
problems, and confusion contributed to
the delays in picking up thousands of
students.
ABOUT 7,000 seventh grade students
were assigned to different schools by
court order yesterday, with about half
~7 of them to be bused.
As one bus was driving to a garage af-
ter dropping off black students at
schools on Cleveland's predominantly
white west side, something smashed its
rear window, according to school
spokesman Douglas Drake. No one was
injured.,
School security director Thomas
Roche said police had determined only
that the window of the bus was shat-
to tered by "an unknown object, possibly
a pellet from a pellet gun."
AT THE 1,114-student Margaret
Spellacy Junior High - one of four

junior highs racially integrated last fall
- three students were arrested.yester-
day for allegedly assaulting a teacher,
Drake said. He said the students had
been drinking and one was seen with a
gun.
Drake also reported a student was
shot in the right hand and another was
hit with a stick in a fight outside the
mostly black East High, a school yet to
be integrated.
Despite the problems, school
Superintendent Peter P. Carlin said,
"Things are going very well, con-
sidering the fact that we almost
doubled our efforts in the transpor-
tation of students. We had very few
mishaps."
THOMAS REESE, 14, waiting for a
bus to take him to the east side was
clearly displeased with the busing plan.
"It stinks," he said.
A disabled school bus backed up traf-

fic on a heavily traveled bridge for 45
minutes, prompting bus driver Gloria
Gilliam to say "Everything's messed
up."i
DESEGREGATION beagn at 33 of
the city's 146 schools last fall, affecting
23,000 pupils, 8,500 of whom were bused.,
Under an order issued by U.S. District
Judge Frank Battisti, citywide in-
tegration is scheduled for September
1980 in the district with more than 90,000
pupils, two-thirds of them black.
Eighth graders will be bused to class
for the first day today, and ninth
graders will follow tomorrow. Monday
is the first full day of class for all 22,700
pupils affected in the desegregation of,
the junior high schools, 11,300 of them to
ride buses.
The district has been plagued with
problems fixing up schools and leasing
buses, and began the desegregation
with only a few extra vehicles in reser-

ve. The Ohio Highway Patrol continued
to inspect leased buses yesterday to try
to certify additional vehicles for use.
Desegregation had been scheduled to
begin Tuesday, but was delayed a-day
because of problems in certifying buses
leased from other states, to comply
with Ohio's minimum safety standards.
FROZEN VEGETABLES
KUTZEBUE, Alaska (AP)-Brig-
ham Young University is lending a
hand to the Eskimos of Kutzebue in the
tundra regions not far from Russia.
In an effort to help increase produc-
tion in family gardens, .fertilizer,
irrigation equipment and know-how
have been brought into areas that were
previously dependent upon hauling
water by hand.

F'Ii-

JEFFERSON.JUNIOR HIGH School welcomes black seventh graders from
Cleveland's east side. Yesterday was the first day of the court-ordered
desegregation for the city's junior high schools.

Two more months for captives?

HOUSING DIVISION
WEST QUADRANGLE
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS
FOR SPRING/SUMMER 1980
Available Starting March 11, 1980
In 1500 SAB
POSITIONS INCLUDE: RESIDENT DIRECTOR AND RESIDENT ADVISOR
Resident Advisor positions require a minimum of 55 credit hours. Graduate status preferred
for the resident directors positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U of M student on the Ann Arbor campus.
(2) Undergraduates must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours and have a 2.5
cumulative grade point average in the school or college in which they are enrolled. (3) Grad-
uate students must be in good academic standing in the school or college in which they are
enrolled. (4) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in residence halls at
University level for at least one year. (5) Proof of these qualifications will be required.
Current staff and other applicants who have an application on file must come to this office to
update their application form. Staff selection and placement shall be determined in the
following order:
1. Current staff in WQBN* who have been reappointed for the
1980-8 1 academic year.
2. Non-returning WQBN hall staff.
3. Returning staff from all other residence halls.
4. Non-returning staff from other halls.
5. Newly appointed staff from any hall.
6. Other qualified applicants. WQBN* equals West Quad, Barbour, and Newberry
DEADLINE FOR APPLICANTS: Friday, March 21, 1980-4:00 PM
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

(Continued from Page 1)
some domestic problems," he was
Quoted.
REPUBLICAN PRESSURE mounted
in the Senate, meanwhile, for the Car-
ter administration'to take new steps to
pressure Iran. Sen. Richard Lugar of
Indiana said he feared the hostages
may never be freed if the United States
does not follow a "strong and bold cour-
se."
He called for the U.S. government to
prepare for a naval blockade and
G ining of Iran's harbors and to detain
1 Iranian diplomats in the United
States. Senate Republican Leader
Howard Baker called Lugar's
state nt "appropriate."
The mostages have been held for 20
weeks by youg Moslem militants

demanding return of the deposed Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and his for-
tune to Iran.
REVOLUTIONARY leader Khomeini
has said the Americans' fate must be
decided by the new Majlis, or
Parliament, which will not be fully
elected until April 4. Other Iranian
leaders have said it will be May before
the Parliament is sufficiently organized
and ready to deal with the question of
whether and when to free the hostages.
Results from last Friday's elections
for the 270-seat Majlis have been
coming in slowly, but they show can-
didates endorsed by the clergy-led
Islamic Republican Party (IRP) in the
lead, having won about four per cent of
the seats decided, twice as many as
won by supporters of Bani-Sadr. The

rest are spread among independents
and candidates of smaller parties.
Bani-Sadr has made clear he wants a
quick resolution of the crisis, but IRP
domination of the Majlis could frustrate
his plans. Leaders of the conservative
party have endorsed the hard-line anti-
U.S. tactics of the embassy militants
and support their demand for the shah.

NOON LUNCHEON
Friday, March,21
John Forsythe: "Cuba Today"
GUILD HOUSE, 602 Monroe
Homemade Soup & Sandwich -754

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