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March 18, 1980 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-18

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C

Page 1O-Tuesday, March 18, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Regents likely to OK
9.5 to 13 per cent
in-state tuition hikes

FINAL DAY OF PEACE TEACH-IN
Experts disagree on draft issue

By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
A proposed tuition hike for
resident undergraduates of from 9.5
to 13 per cent for the 1980-81
academic year is expected to be ap-
proved by the Regents later this
week.
In response to the state's request
to see next year's tentative tuition
levels by early April, administrators
have been evaluating possible
tuition ranges over the last several
months. The state wants the figures
for computing state competitive
scholarships. Non-resident and
graduate tuition increases have not
been proposed.
Preparations by both the state and
the University regarding ap-
propriations for the next academic
year just recently picked up pace.
The legislature has been holding
higher education appropriations
hearings, and the University has
been evaluating its own budget
resources, bracing itself for cut-
backs.
IN JANUARY, Gov. William
Milliken proposed a 9.5 per cent hike
in state appropriations.

Harvey Brazer, chairman of the
Committee on the Economic Status
of the Faculty (CESF) spoke to the
faculty Senate Assembly yesterday
on negotiations for faculty salary in-
creases in 1980-81. Brazer said his
committee was concerned the
University administration has not
made faculty salaries a high enough
priority in the University budget.
"There are no commitments more
urgent than the need to prevent fur-
ther erosion of the economic status
of the faculty," Brazer wrote in a
memo to Acting Vice-President for
Academic Affairs and Chairman of
the Committee on Budget Ad-
ministration Alfred Sussman.'
BRAZER ALSO said it is wrong.
for the administration to suggest
that "faculty salaries and only
faculty salaries" are fed by hikes in
student tuition.
The tuition levels proposed to the
Regents for undergraduate residen-
ts in the lower division range from
$1,327 to $1,370 - up 9.5 to 13 per cent
from this year's $1,212 figure. Upper
division students face a similar in-
crease.

By GREGG WOLPER
President Carter's call for
registration could lead to a draft and
should be opposed, former Attorney
General Ramsey Clark and U.S. Rep.
Robert Carr (D-Lansing) said Sunday
in separate lectures on campus.
But Brayton Harris, assistant direc-
tor of the Selective Service, disagreed.
Harris, who appeared with Clark, said
that the purpose of registration is to en-
sure that the country can mobilize in an
emergency, and "not to have a
peacetime draft."
CLARK AND Harris addressed more
than 150 in Rackham Auditorium, while
Carr spoke to about 40 in Hutchins Hall.

Both events were included in the final
day of the "Peace and Politics" teach-
in sponsored by the Coalition Against
War.
Clark, who served as attorney
general in 1967-1968 under President
Johnson, said that he has "come to op-
pose all forced registration or conscrip-
tion, and added that registration would
increase the probability of war.
"To anticipate war and prepare for
war is to make war inevitable," Clark
said.
Further measures should be taken to
lessen the possibility of war, Clark said.
He called for the U.S. to dismantle
much of its nuclear weaponry and halt
the increases in the research and

development of military technology.
MOST EXPERTS agree that about 26
{countries will possess a nuclear bomb
by the year 2000, Clark said. "We had
better come to grips with the issue im-
mediately," he said. Clark received a
standing ovation as he left the
auditorium.
Carr, a member of the House Armed
Services Commitee since 1975, said that
the issue of registration cannot be
separated from that of thedraft.
"You can't divide the two," he said.
Many Congressional supporters of
registration see it as a way to resume
conscription, Carr said.
"If it's just registration, it is by its
very nature meaningless," Carr said.
"It isn't just registration, it's
registration in preparation for a draft."
CARR ENCOURAGED students to
attend the anti-registration rally to be
held in Washington this Saturday, but
stressed that personal visits to
congressmen or their staffs will have
more effect than the rally.
"Protests and rallies in Washington
are great for getting national media
coverage, but in terms of real impact
on legislation, I'd have to say they're
next to zero," Carr said. "We get a

protest march almost every day."
The possibility of the bill's passage i
"a bit murky," Carr said, because of
the President's recent budget revision,
and the fact that Congress has already
reached its spending limit. The
proposal may be defeated if and when it
appears before the ,full House, Carr
said. .
Harris, appearing as a represen-
tative of the White House, said that
registration and the draft wer
separate issues, and that the reaction to
the registration call "has put the
possibility of a peacetime draft ever-
farther off."
The country needs registration to be
prepared in the case of a national
emergency, according to Harris. "If
the U.S. had been better prepared in
1940 and 1941, World War II might have
been shorter by several years," he said.
Pressed by an audience member fore
definition of a national emergency,
Harris replied that "a national
emergency is what Congress and the
president agree is a national emergen-
cy.
Harris also said that the decision to
revitalize the Selective Service had
been made long before the president's
call for registration.

2 women get wrong
operations in, mix-up

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Two
women were wheeled into surgery at
Graduate Hospital, but, through a once-
in-a-million mixup, each one got the
operation that was intended for the
other, their relatives confirmed yester-
day.
One woman who checked in with a
ruptured disc had part of a neck thyroid
gland removed, while the other patient
who had the thyroid problem got the
cervical laminectomy at the back of her
head.
HOSPITAL OFFICIALS refused to
say whether the unnecessary surgery
would affect the future health of either
patient. They said the mistake was
"embarrassing" and "horribly regret-
ful."
Murray Levin, a member of the
hospital board, added "luckily both
patients are in good condition and the
patients are understanding of what
happened."
Alfred Edmonson said his wife went
in for back surgery last Thursday, but
when he went to see her afterward he,
was summoned to a room down the hall
by a staff physician.
Classes forming
for April 19 and
June 28 LSATs
CALL 1-261-LSAT OR WRITE:
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"HE (THE doctor), told me they had
made a mistake," Edmonson told a
reporter. "He said the doctor who was
to have operated on my wife operated
on the other woman."
Virginia Edmonson, 54, had the back
of her head shaved for the laminec-
tomy, but instead she is now recovering
from the thyroid operation with the
bandage on the front part of her-neck,
the husband said.
Annie Robinson, 50, who was to have
had the parathyroid gland removed,
reportedly wound up instead with
surgery on the back of her neck. But
hospital officials refused to say what
was actually done to her.
HAROLD CRAMER, the chairman of
the hospital board, originally created
an inquiry panel "to determine what
had transpired and to recommend
corrective procedures if necessary."
But he dropped that idea, he said, "in
order not to interfere with in-
vestigations now under way by the
Pennsylvania Health Department and
the hospital's peer review committee."
Robinson's plight was made public by
her protesting family. -
BOTH WOMEN were shielded by the
hospital from inquiring reporters, and
their telephone calls were being
monitored.
A spokesman for Graduate's
executive director, Paul Schofield,
planned to issue a statement on the
surgical mixup, but then backed off,
referring all questions to the hospital's
lawyer.
The 300-bed hospital was founded in
1926 as part of the University of Pen-
nsylvania Medical School system.
Budgetary problems forced Penn to cut
Graduate loose in 1977 although it still
maintains a medical teaching af-
filiation with the university on the
graduate level.

r

I

44

Uruguay diplomat escapes
from embassy in Colombia

THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
IA ^r~g~n 227 S. Ingalls THELITTLE

From AP and UPI
BOGOTA, Colombia - A Uruguayan
diplomat escaped from the guerrilla-
held Dominican Embassy in a dramatic
dash to freedom yesterday, sliding
down a rope of bedsheets and scram-
bling away as bullets flew around him.
An army officer who spoke with Fer-
nando Gomez after his pre-dawn escape
said another diplomat held hostage by
leftist guerrillas for 20 days refused to
join in the jump from the second story
window.
HOURS LATER, the guerrillas inside
the building said Venezuelan Am-
bassador Virgilio Lovera, 63, suffered a
massive heart attack. Other hostages
shouted to army officers outside to send
in the same specialist who visited
Lovera twice last week to check his
high blood pressure.
Dr. Enrique Urdaneta Holguin, who
was inside the diplomatic mission for
an hour, said the guerrillas indicated
they would not free any more hostages,
regardless of their state of health.
The officers offered instead to
evacuate Lovera by ambulance, a
move rejected by the guerrillas who in-
sisted the doctor must come to the em-
bassy or they would hold the Foreign
Ministry responsible if Lovera died
because of the lack of medical atten-
tion.

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UNDER COVER of darkness, the,
Uruguayan jumped into a garden in
front of the embassy, crawled behind
parked cars and then ran for his life
toward army troops, dodging thre
shots fired from the embassy, wi
nesses said.
"Don't shoot, don't shoot, I'm the
Uruguayan ambassador!" Gomez, 43,
shouted as he raced to freedom after 19
days' captivity with 32 other hostages,
including U.S. Ambassador, Diego
Asencio.
"We can't explain -how the am-
bassador was not hurt by the terrorists.
It was a moonlit night and he was com-
pletely exposed to their guns," said a4
army officer who participated in the
rescue.
GOMEZ WAS the first hostage to
escape from the embassy. Five days af-
ter the siege began, the Costa Rican
ambassador was released along with
several other women hostages and
later, the ambassador of Austria was
freed to join his ailing wife in Vienna.
A doctor who examined Gomez at a
military hospital said Gomez received
only bruises during his escapeg
although his chronic right shoulder
problem was aggravated during the
embassy takeover.
Ransom negotiations between the
government and the guerrillas broke
down after five sessions and no date has
been set for them to resume.
The guerrillas, demanding freedom
for jailed comrades, have vowed to kill
themselves and their captives if their,
conditions are not met.

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