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March 18, 1980 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-18

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 18, 1980-Page 7

STAR

BAR

41 die in San Salvador clash

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109 N. Main St.-f69-0109

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador
(UPI)-At least 41 people were killed,
in a string of clashes between
government forces and leftist activists
yesterday, and an intense firefight
along the edges of the National
University may have added more
casualties.
Witnesses said the gunbattle between
leftists inside the university and
government troops backed by armored
cars who surrounded the, campus
overnight lasted for two and a half
hours in mid-afternoon, then fell to
sporadic shooting.

THERE WERE no immediate reports
of dead or wounded, and troops ringing
the campus, a stronghold of four
powerful leftist groups, refused
permission to reporters who wanted to
go inside.
Early in the day, 23 people were
shot to death in a gun battle between
national guardsmen and leftist activists
who tried to break into a coffee
plantation recently nationalized by the
ruling military-civilian junta.
Authorities said members of the
leftist Popular Revolutionary Bloc
walked into the Colima Hacienda 30
miles north of the capital and tried to

seize some of the leaders of the
peasants who worked on the farm.
NATIONAL GUARDSMEN, sent into
the plantation two weeks ago when the
farm was nationalized, traded gunfire
with the leftists in a lengthy battle and
finally drove them off, a spokesman for
the jnta said.
Thue spokesperson also said 12
"subversives" and one guardsman
were killed early yesterdayrwhen some
200 leftist guerrillas armed with
submachine guns and shotguns
ambushed a guard patrol in San
Martin, 12 miles west of the capital.
The 36 deaths brought to 41 the death

toll on a day that also saw five persons
injured in two bombings, including one
accidental blast as leftist activists
seized the government water and
sewage building.
At least five people died earlier in the
day when treasury police armored cars
and truckloads of plainclothes agents
armed with submachine guns attacked
disgruntled workers occupying the
Beckman Instruments Co.
The raiders took three of the workers
to a separate room andshot them inthe
head, then attacked two workers with
machetes, killing one of them and
seriously injuring the other, a woman,
the survivors said.

APPEARING TONIGHT:
GANG WARS with JOHNNY THUNDERS
ANN ARBOR'S ORIGINAL HONKY TONK DANCE BAR

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Melee follows Dead Boys concerti

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ยข 4
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(Continued from Page 1)
us; it was because they liked us." He
estimated the damages to the Dead
Boys' equipment at about $1000, a two
speakers and much of Johnny Blitz's
drum set were damaged (Bob Tickle
estimates "about a $200 loss in
damages to the Second Chance's rented
audio equipment, in addition to the
club's broken glasses, pitchers, and
furniture).
Throughout their brief set, the Dead
Boys reportedly aimed insults at their
*audience. A tape recording of the.
RIVER BLINDNESS
ACCRA, Ghana (AP)-River blind-
ness, caused by a parasite which is
transmitted by the bite of the black fly,
is a major problem in West Africa. An'
estimated 100,000 people suffer from
the disease and many others live in
danger of infection.
Seven countries of the Volta River
basin (where the black fly breeds)-
Benin, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Mali,
Niger, Togo and Upper Volta-have
joined in a long-range program to
eliminate the disease. With financial
help and equipment from four United
Nations' agencies-the World Bank,
WHO, FAO and the U.N. Development
Program-weekly spraying of the Volta
and its tributaries is under way.
It is estimated that it will take 20
years for the blAck fly to be eradicated
but already there has been a significant
reduction in the breeding areas curren-
tly being sprayed.f

performance revealed band members
calling glass-hurtling fans "mother . .
.," 'ass holes," and other obscene
names. The onslaught of beer glasses.
reportedly came after Blitz poured a
pitcher of beer over the audience and
his drums.
In addition, lead singer Bators
reportedly began spitting beer on the
audience, according to witness Jim
Barry. "The first thing I saw was Stiv
spitting beer all over the audience, and
it was, well, 'let's go from there.' It was
like the band just wanted to get a
reacton out of the audience."
AFTER ENDURING the audience's
wrath for several songs, the Dead Boys
fled backstage and to : their basement
dressing room.
"All of a sudden, these guys come
hauling down the stairs," recalled
Madhatter, who was working security
at the time. "They were freaking out; I
knew either the place was on fire or
they were throwing shit onstage. It was
like there had been an earthquake."
As many audience members tried to
get the Dead Boys to return, the band's
road crew dtismantled the glass-ridden
equipment. The, road manager
reportedly took the guitars offstage
using a table as a shield.
Drummer Johnny Blitz claims he
suffered a "mild concussion" and a
broken nose, and said that the band's
"roady," whose name he could not
recall, also received a consussion.
He said that he left the nightclub
"anid went to see a doctor," although
the two local hospitals denied admitting
anyone by the name of Blitz.

----_ _- -- 1 rE U

DRUMMER BLITZ appeared some
30 minutes after the Dead Boys had
stopped playing, and offered $500 to the
person who injured his nose with a
thrown glass to "come downstairs" and
have it out with him "one on one." "I've
been in this band for four years," he
shouted, "and I've never been hit with a
bottle. I come to Ann Arbor and I get hit
in the head with a bottle."
The Dead Boys currently have two
albums out, one entitled "Young, Loud,
and Snotty;" other, "We Have Come
For Your Children."
"We didn't expect the problems with
the audience," said Madhatter. "We
expected to have problems with the
Dead Boys." Bators said the audience's
energy was justified-"not to hurt us,
but to let that energy out. Breaking
glass, breaking anything is a great
outlet for frustrations-it was
tremendous."

.L v _Mm- v a ,./

minority
efforts
needed-
Powe r
(Continued from Page 1)
fered suggestions to increase minority
enrollment and decrease minority at-
trition.
A Chicano woman suggested
providing role models for students,
citing the fact that there are no Chicano
professors at the University. Ad-
ministrative Assistant Eunice Burns
said the administration should contact
people from families in which no one
has attended college and encourage
them to enroll in the University.
Although throughout the lecture the
speakers pointed to the grave problems
concerning minority enrollment and at-
trition, Jeffry ended her presentation
on an optimistic note.
"It is my belief that the times ahead
of us are not (going to be) easy, but if in
the '80's we have an unfailing commit-
ment and persistence and fortitude to
withstand the barriers ... eventually,
we will get there," Jeffry said.

6IN

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ROUND TABLE AWARD
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP)-The
American Revolution Round Table
Award for the best book on the
American Revolution published in 1979
has been awarded to Joseph P. Tustin.
Tusin was honored for his work on
"Diary of the American War: A
Hessian Journal," by Capt.Johann
Ewald. Tustin spent 30 years editing
and translating the diary, an account of
the Revolutionary War kept by a
Hessian mercenary soldier who arrived
in this country in 1776 to fight for the
British.

Saint Louis University's
Academic Year in Madrid
IN
C4
Al

Potter views
Continued from Page 5)

3T
THE PRACTICAL,-"

NOVATIVE
DURSES IN

Glierm an

/

PPLICATION OF THE SPANISH
LANGUAGE ......COURSES
EMPHASIZING
t(POKEN SPANISH*.
For information:
The Director
Saint Louis University
in Spain
Calle dela Viva, 3
Madrid 3-Spain

available, the total absence of such ob-
viously meritorious works tends to
chronically undermine the judicial
acumen of the Awards Jury.
EVEN SO, there were surprisingly
few howlers in the 7:00 to 9:00 winner's
show Sunday night. With the exception
of Paul Winkler's Bondi, a tedious,
split-screen rendering of beach
frolickers, and Vincent Scilla~s Is This
.Life or Just Love of Death?, a maudlin,
visually scattering ode to loneliness in
New-York City, there wasn't a really
bad film in the entire bunch.
Sptephen Marro's The Box Man, also
'dealing with the torments of urban sur-
vival, was a lovely, whimsical little
satire about a man who decided to
chuck the rat-race rigors and go live,
literally, in a cardboard box. He sets up
house on city sidewalks, traffic islands,
any place he can call nirvanah-until a
fellow in distress jolts jim back into the
real world. Marro consistently blends
gritty realism and expressionism to
make a film that is both hilariouslr far-
cial and genuinely moving. The Box
Man also boasts a remarkably *x-
pressive lead actor named Bruce
Siegel, whose funny, poignant perfor-
mance is an anomaly in a festival
where human actors are usually sym-
bolic stick figures at best.
1 AMONG OTHER winners, Pat

Oleszko's Kneel and Dimples was a
pleasant but second-rate (for her) pup-
pet illusion. Much more effective was
Mike Connor's In Search Of, a wonder-
fully anarchistic spectacle of a grubby
clay figure occupoed predominantly
with a search for his missing head.
Connor's film hysterically illustrated
the almost limitless entertainment
potential of the combined glories of in-
novative animation and genuine wit..
Buck and Spanky, by John Tintori
and Mary Cybulski, was an arch, often
inaccessible exercise in surrealism
which nonetheless exhibited a sur-
passing artistic expertise. A brilliant
little sequence involving the continuous
transformation of sketched heads into a
series ofsdifferent persons seemed to
consciously, joyously illuminate the
universal similarity in all of us.
. Paul Glabicki's Five Improvisations
played gorgeous rhythmatic tricks
intermingling computer squiggle with
artistic homages to pioneer animator
Windsor McKay, while Judy Whitaker's
Radius transformed the anatomy of a
bicycle into a mysterious, concentric
universe all its own. Lastly, Aaron
Bass' Zo-oid demonstrated if nothing
else a frenetic-paced talent for an 11-
year old animation artist. The thing is, I
was drawing better pictures than he
was when I was only five. If only I'd had
ambition ...

(Continued from Page 5,
life, a cartoon biology lecture at once
grandly abstract and charmingly per-
sonalized: In one priceless moment of
evolutionary condensation, a fish is
tossed out of water, staring dismayed
at its dry surroundings until it suddenly
sprouts little walking fins, and grins
with childish glee at the new apen-
dages.
Steve Schular tried to paint a grim-
mer portrait of evolution in RKO Zoic
(as in "paleozoic era," etc.) which
naggingly juxtaposed fossilized
trilobites with clips from the inner
workings of a Coca-Cola bottler. In the
inimitable words of Danny Partridge:
Heavy. Other films in the lofty
philosophical/psychological vein were,
more evocative. Jane Dickson's A Nice
Hot Bath and Fu-Ding Cheng's Flight of
Ideas both strained after a cinematic
equivalent of stream-of-consciousness,
and though Bath was simply too
crudely symbolic to have such resonan-
ce, Flight of Ideas occasionally took off.
A printed prologue tells us that the
movie is out to convey theexperience of
meditation-a journey from "uhboun-
ded madness" to "pure
awareness,,-and then a narrator
repeats "Flight of
ideas ... flight ... flight" as a mantra
and harsh, free-associatory images fly
by in lullingly rapid succession. I wish
Cheng had stuck some more pure
awareness into all the unbounded mad-
ness, but the madness (fixated, for
some reason, on the John F. Kennedy

era) had me hypnotized.
The most outstanding visual trip of
the evening, though, was Larry Cuba's
Two Space, an absolutely mesmerizing
computer-graphic animation with a
Gamelon soundtrack. Cuba's interplay
of white dots was so effective that I
think I could have stared at it for two
hours without blinking. A film with a
similar effect was Rob Zeibel's Smile
and Relax, a voyeuristic peek at a
woman's infinite variety of moods and
facial expressions.
I was going to end this article by
balling out the Festival judges for
picking Elvin Jones: Different Drum-
mer as top documentary, instead of
Lingo or Save Our Planet, a politically
standard but cinematically breath-
taking documentary on nukes. But the
ax, alas, has fallen, and all we can do is
wait until next year. Personally, I can
hardly wait.

HE DIDN'T GET THERE BY HANGING AROUND
THE HOME CAMPUS
Designed for the concerned student who may not be financially
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ENJOY THE THEATERS, MUSEUMS, & CULTURAL LIFE
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