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March 18, 1980 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-18

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REP. DRAWS VARIETY OF BACKERS

Anderson supporters unite in Ill.

By AMY SALTZMAN
Special to the iaily
CHICAGO-Grace Gitstad and
George Golubouskis are not like-
minded in their political thinking.
Gitstad is an elderly Chicago housewife
who says she has been a Republican all

candidate in today's primary,
considers himself a liberal, and says he
would ordinarily never vote for a
Republican presidential candidate.
But both hope that John Anderson of
Rockford, Ill. will be the next president
of the United States.
GITSTAD AND Golubouskis reflect
the unique mix of followers that has
swarmed to Anderson's fledgling
campaign for the presidency over the
past two weeks. They represent what
Anderson calls a "new coalition" of
socially liberal but economically
conservative people.
It is this new combination of voters
that Anderson is counting on to hand
him a victory in today's Republican
primary.
The latest Chicago Tribune poll
shows Reagan slightly ahead of
Anderson, 36 to 34 per cent, with former
CIA director George Bush trailing far
behind with only 12 per cent. At the end
of last week a Tribune poll showed
Anderson with a small lead over
Reagan.
Despite recent jabs from the right
and the left, Anderson has continued his
straight-talking, issue-oriented
campaign, refusing to categorize
himself along neat, politically

expedient lines. "I think words like
conservative, moderate, and liberal
have largely outlived their usefulness.
They are almost totally irrelevant in
describing a president's stand on the
issues," Anderson said during a
campaign stop in Rockford.
"LIBERALS" AND "conservatives"
like Gitstad and Golubouskis use words
like "consistent," "truthful,"
"straightforward,"' and
"compassionate" to describe
Anderson.
Neither Gitstad nor Golubouskis
agree with Anderson on all the issues.
Gitstad doesn't like his pro-choice stand
on abortion. Golobouskis disagrees with
his moderate position on nuclear
power. But both say that the fact that
they know exactly where he stands on
all the issues places him high abokve
the other candidates.
. "I don't see eye to eye with him on
everything. But he's consistent. With
the other candidates you can't even add
up the plusses and the minuses because
you don't know what they are,"
Golubouskis said.
But as "the Anderson difference" has
become a serious phenomenon in the
Republican presidential sweepstakes,
the Illinois congressman has suddenly
found himself the target of political

forces on the right and on the left.
From the right, Anderson was hit by
his three Republican challengers who
in a debate here last week accused him
of not being a genuine Republican.
ANDERSON RESPONDED by
singling out Rep. Philip Crane (R-Ill.)
for "political immaturity" in
questioning his GOP loyalty. "I feel
very comfortable with the Republican
party. That's where I belong, and that's
where I'm going to stay," Anderson
said.
From the left, the Independent Voters
of Illinois-Independent Precinct
Organization (IVI-IPO), is urging
Anderson supporters not to abandon the
Democratic primary and important
local races. Instead, the group is
suggesting that independents and
liberal Democrats who want to vote for
Anderson take a Democratic ballot and
write in Anderson's name.
A local ad sponsored by the
organization states: "Voting for John
Anderson might make you -feel good,
but by sacrificing our local good guys,
you'll be hurting the people of Illinois
and the future of Chicago."
The Anderson camp has responded to
this jolt from the left with something in
between irritation and disgust.

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... strong front in Ill.
her life. Her second choice for president
is Ronald Reagan.
Golubouskis, one of some 40
University students who drove here
from Ann Arbor to work for their

With momentum shrinking and dim prospects
in Ill., primary, Bush starts to play rough

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
A Daily News Analysis
CHICAGO -- In the beginning,
George Bush created organization and
saw that it was good.
After organization, he created
momentum out of the cornfields of
*wa, and saw that it too was good.
Suddenly, the Reagan flood hit New
Hampshire, drowning the organization,

the momentum, the stardom,
everything that George Bush had
created.
NOW BUSH is struggling for political
survival. Once considered a possible
winner here in Illinois, he seems
doomed for a distant third in today's
Republican primary behind Reagan
and home state representative John
Anderson.

FILMS
Red Flag Theatre-The Mother, R. C. Theatre East Quad, 8 p.m.
Israeli Film Festival-The Policeman, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
AAFC-Persona, 7, 10:15 p.m.; Cries and Whispers, 8:30 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell.
U.S.-China Friendship Assoc.-The Monkey King, a cartoon in English,
7:30 p.m., Assembly Hall, Union.
Cinema Guild-Autumn Afternoon, Old Arch. Aud., 8 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Ctr: for Chinese Studies-Lois Oksenberg, "Autumn in China," slide
presentation, 12 p.m., Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Int'l Ctr./Ecumenical Campus Ctr.-Uri Lebiathan, "Relevancy for
Western Civilization of Studying the Aged on a Kibbitz," 12 p.m., Rec. room,
Int'l Center.
PAC/Guild House-Joe Summers, "Students Activism in the 80's: Coping
with the Depressed Economy," 12 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Resource Pol. and MGMT. Prog.-Gdnter Schramm, Shadow Pricing and
the Opportunity Cost of Labor: Deep Soil Plowing in Mexico," 12 p.m., 1028
Dana.
Public Policy Studies-Dmitri Simes, "Prospects for U.S.-Soviet
Relationships in the 1980's," 1:30 p.m., W. Conf. Rm., Rackham.
Bioengineering-Robert Rosen, "Molecular and Cellular Control in
Biology: Biological Implications," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Eng.
Career Planning and Placement-Dorothy Bestor, "Teaching-Just One
Career for Teachers?" 4 p.m., Schorling Aud., Sch. of Ed.
Chemistry-Bruce Anerill, "Synthetic Approaches to the Metal Cofactors
of Nitrogenase," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Geological Sci.-Gerd Olszak, "Relationships Between Crust and Mantle
in the Development of Deep Basins," 4 p.m., 4001 C.C. Little.
Spartacus Youth League-Dale Reissner, Phyllis Anwar,
"Afghanistan/Iran-No Third Road! Women in the East: Proletarian
Revolution or Slavery?" 7:30 p.m., Multipurpose room, UGLI.
Southern Africa: The Year of the Child-Goler Butcher, Dir. Africa Div.,
AID, "Southern Africa: The Year of the Child," 8 p.m., League.
Aerospace Engineering-Elaine S. Oran, Naval Research Laboratory,
Wash., D.C., "A Theoretical Model for Flame Ignition", 4 p.m., 107
Aerospace Bldg.
DSOC-Zolton Ferency, "Legal Means to Socialist Ends," 7:30 p.m.,
Kuenzel Rm, Union.
MEETINGS
Soc. of Christian Engineers-Ted Kennedy, Pres., Trenton Corp. speaker,
12 p.m., 311 E. Eng.
Russian Club-12 p.m., Commons rm., MLB.
Extension Service-"On Line Searching-Lockheed Dialog Data Bases:
Advanced Dialog System Refresher Seminar," 12:30 p.m., Mich. League.
CRLT-"The Socratic Method of Teaching," 7:30 p.m., 109 E. Madison.
PIRGIM-Lisa Mitchell-Yellin, "Fundraising Workshop," 7 p.m., Conf.
Rm. 5, Union.
Students for Equal Rights Amendments-10 p.m., Mo-Jo students lounge.
Committee fora Citizens Party-7:30 p.m., Room D, League. -
Orienteering Club-first meeting, 7:30 p.m., Room 2230, CCRB.
Ctr. for Western European Studies-Danilo Colci, informal discussion, 10
a.m., 5208 Angell.
Extension Service-"Off Road Vehicle Use as a Management Challenge,"
Rackham, for info., call 764-5304.
PDRFnRMANVFA

The old strategy has been thrown out,
especially since his poor showings in
the southern primaries last week. The
cornerstone of the new game plan is
two-fold: Show voters he's to the left of
Reagan and to the right of Anderson,
and dispel the notion that he's a media-
built contender lacking a consistent
ideological base.
To accomplish the first aim, the for-
mer CIA chief hasyrecently shifted from
the nice-guy approach, and is now pun-
ching hard. No longer is it politically
profitable to obey the Eleventh Com-
mandment - Thou shalt not criticize a
fellow Republican.
IN A FOREIGN policy address
Friday, he lashed out at a -Reagan
proposal which would set a deadline for
the release of the 50 U.S. hostages in
Iran.
"I would hope the governor has taken
into consideration the fact that we are
dealing in Iran with volatile, irrational
forces. This is to say that whatever the
fact that we are dealing with, the
Reagan secret plan, it is possible - in-
deed probable - that the zealots run-
ning the show in Tehran would ignore
the deadline - and then what?" Bush
said.
Actually, the barrage against Reagan
isn't that new. What is new is the attack
against Anderson. Now that Gerald
Ford has decided to stay out of the fray,
only the Illinois representative stands
in the way of a Reagan/Bush showdown
for the nomination. Only with that mat-
ch-up, Bush insiders admit, can he hope
to dethrone Reagan. Since the begin-
ning, Bush said that it's him against
Reagan and no one else has a chance.
AN ANDERSON win here- coupled
with another poor' Bush showing could
convince anti-Reagan Republicans that
only Anderson can knock off the former
California governor. Further substan-
tiating Bush's fear is a Chicago Tribune
poll which came out yesterday that
shows Bush third, far behind the two
front-runners. In February, 41 per cent
TM oe ren'
for a day
(Continued from Page 1)
alcoholic concoction the Club serves.
A few students were asked why they
were celebrating St. Patrick's Day.
"I'm drinking because St. Patrick is the
patron saint of engineers," Joe Filio
said.
Even those celebrants who woke up
this morning without a hangover
probably found themselves with some
reminder of yesterday's festivities:
The dye used to give an Irish tint to beer
and other food has the same effect on
teeth. So much for pearly whites.

of the moderates favored Bush and only
17 per cent backed Anderson. Yester-
day's poll shows Anderson with a 47 to
12 per cent lead over Bush among the
moderates.,
Thus, Bush has thrown his toughest
ammunition against Anderson.
"This country must have
registration. A 50-cent gasoline tax
would paralyze the elderly, and how
can we cut defense spendingnow,
especially after Afghanistan? These
are things John Anderson just cannot
understand," Bush said.
During a recent press conference, the
strain of the campaign and his plunge in
the polls seemed to be affecting Bush. A
reporter asked him for his response to
an Anderson allegation that, Bush would
support almost unlimited power for the
FBI, Bush's face suddenly reddened, he
pointed his finger, and grew visibly per-
turbed.
"Imagine the nerve of that guy. Did
he really say that?" Bush shouted. "It's
outrageous."

SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE AT
Located in the Catskill Mountains in Upstate N.Y.
Our 49th year
Positions available as cabin counselors and instructors in land
sports, water sports, lake and pool (W.S.I.), fiber arts, wood-
working, ceramics, music, photography, ham radio/electron-
ics, gymnastics, tennis, pioneering, and R.N.'s.
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS WED., MARCH 19th
For information-Contact Summer Placement Office, 764-7460.
Positions available for Teen Tour Leaders to Israel must have been to
Israel, worked with teens, and be 21 yrs-- plus. Send resume to Summer
Placement Office.

Now playing at Butterfield Theatres :
FEVE R OIDA S $3 MONDAY NIGHT IS
WEDNESDAY ISMOITRUAYS $3.5
"BARGAIN DAY" EVEN THNGS $ "GUEST NIGHT"
" GSEN &NDR$3.0Fr$30
MATINEES UNTI 530
TC93A uss e
Cam M 66-61 ITsCL
1214 S. Univo ity 668-6416 T SCRL
Mon Tues Thurs Fri at-7 30, 9:15oIT'SHER
Wdsat Sun at 'SEE
0305:00 7%0 9:15 (R) '
Wavside ENDS
Mon Tues., Thurs.Fr, 7:309 15 MAR.
Sat. Sun., Wed 20th
1:30-3:30-5:307:30-9:15.-
An American Dream
A curse v-'i 4meS a lov('tOry.
from hell! 7
0~4 en.
CANNON FILMS RELEASE Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7:009:30
715-9:45 Sat., Sur, Wed.
(VPR L :3-:3-:5-:5Sat.,Sun., Wed. 1:00-4:007:00-9:30
1 3030 7:5-9:45
State 1.2.3.4
231 S. State-662-6264- 662-6264
(UPPER LEVEL) Mon.,Toes. Thurs. Fri.
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7:10-9:40 7:009:30
Sat., Sun., Wed. Sat., Sun., Wed.
1:25-4:25-7:10-9:40 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30
GEORGE SEGAL- NATALIE WOOD NOMINATED FOR
The comedy 2 ACADEMY AWARDS
that fools around*' lot! PETER SELLERS
ENDS LAST SHIRLEY MacLAINE
THURS.G
MARRIED BEING
UPLETHERE
... United Artists

'V
i.
'I
Yi
Wi
6S
Wl

... takes new hard line

Another new twist to the Bush
playbook has been the candidate's sud-
den refusal , to discuss campaign
strategy, quite a turnaround for a man
who in January could only talk about
his momentum and his organization.
Gone is the Bush as a high school foot-
ball coach, constantly giving pep rallies
to his supporters. In return, there's a
more serious, almost desperate Bush,
stressing the issues.
"I will not respond to questions about
tactics. I will only talk about the
issues," he said.
Whether this switch will allow him to
stay securely in the presidential sweep-
stakes is uncertain, but his image as a
freshly prominent figure is definitely a
thing of the past.

NOW OPEN
EXPOSURE!

A GOOD TAN USED TO
REQUIRE SPENDING LONG
HOURS LAYING IN THE
SUMMER SUN, WHICH ALSO
MEANT LONG HOURS OF
EXPOSURE TO CROWDS,
HEAT, AND SUNBURN.
AT CALIFORNIA TAN WE

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A FRFF TRIAl SESION._

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