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March 15, 1980 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-15
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7W

Page 2-Saturday, March 15, 1980-The Michigan Daily

S

75

-W

S

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, Ma
WITH STUDENT FASHION

he Midigan 1DaUiQ
Ten Best-Dressed Professors
In an effort to maintain the University's strong reputation for quality in everv aspect, the Daily has
compiled a list of the "Ten Best-Dressed Professors. " Based upon reader nominations, the foliowing dapper
dressers are listed at random, with the exception of the first-place winner. Reports that professors are recruited
and granted tenure on the basis of their wardrobes could not be confirmed.
1. LAW PROF. JOHN- REED-Upon hearing of his most recent honor, first place winner
John Reed claimed to be "embarrassed" and modestly asked, "Who are the idiots who nominated
me?" Reed, who, according to one law student, "looks like he stepped out of Gentlemen's
Quarterly," nonetheless graciously consented to be photographed (left).

The

'in' look never looked bc

2. MUSIC PROF. ELAINE SIS-
MAN-Truly the Swan Lake of our
list, Sisman dresses nothing less
than spectacularly.
Sisman prides herself as the
only professor whose wardrobe is
larger than the number of lectures
she teaches. Last year. she wore a
beautiful white dress for her famed
Romeo and Juliet lecture. Don't
miss it, it's a knockout.
3. ECONOMICS PROF.
WILLIAM SH EPHERD-Shepherd
brought the one and only note of
"sobriety" to this list, when one
student remarked about him,
"Sheoherd dresses like a banker."
Despite this fact, the Daily fashion
critics decided even bankers need
some attention, so he, too, was
named among the best-dressed.
4. ASSISTANT COM-
MUNICATIONS PROF.
ELIZABETH LEEBRON-Proving
the old adage that the grade is
mightier than the truth, one rather
enterprising student noted that

Leebron "dresses sharply--plus I
need an A." Another student cynic
suggested Leebron "is the only one
who cares about the way she looks."
5. ASSISTANT LAW PROF.
MICHAEL ROSENZWEIG--In good
conscience, And Justice for All, we
could not keep a professor off the list
who reportedly looks like Al Pacino.
According to one second-year law
student, in his navy suit with red tie.
Rosenzweig is "a real fox."
6. ENGLISH PROF. RUSSELL
FRASER-This eminent
Shakespearean scholar is known
for his partiality to the color green.
Whether garbed in a carefully ap-
pointed green corduroy suit with
light shirt, patterned tie, and collar
pin, or a tartan plaid sportcoat with
green turtleneck sweater and Frye
boots, Fraser is always well-dressed
and entertaining.
7. ASSISTANT LIBRARY
SCIENCE PROF. EDWIN COR-
TEZ-Versatility is the name of the
game for Cortez, who reportedly is a
"knockout" when he wears either a

three-piece suit or a pair of jeans.
8. ASSOCIATE HISTORY PROF.
GERALD LINDERMAN-Known
throughout the department as "Mr.
Clean," Linderman always comes to
lecture dressed to a 'T.' The oxford
shoes, the three-point hankie, the
neatly pressed front pockets, and
white shirts . . . he's got it all.
(Reportedly, he even puts starch in
his jammies.)
9. ECONOMICS PROF. ANN
ANDERSON-Fashion critics in
Anderson's classes have labeled her
wardrobe "top fashion" and
'sophisticated without being snot-
ty.'
10. ASSISTANT ENGLISH PROF.
STEVEN LAVINE-Neatly coif-
fured and casually bedecked, Lavine
resembles his former classmates at
Harvard University-a preppie
through-and-through. From the
elbow patches on his corduroy suits,
to his topsiders, to his collection of
Pierre Cardin ties, he dresses the
way our mothers want us to
dress-like a doctor.

Continued from Page 5
"Christine wiped the tears from her almond eyes
with fingers covered with diamonds, which shone and
blinked in the bright courtroom light like a freshly
polished beacon light on a rockbound coast. Madam
wore blue serge, topped with a neat black turban and
a couple of silver wolverine pelts, hung about her
shapely neck, stealing the fancies of any man, except
Henry II. He was impeccably clad in a light suit of
reddish-faun color, suitable for divorce trials or
European weddings ..."
Well, the new spring fashions are here from the
campuses of Princeton and Berkeley, where fashion
is born. Jeff (right) is ready for either an evening of
study, or a date with a Sigma Delta Tau. He sports a
camel hair blazer, adorned with a silk kerchief and
oak buttons. His jacket is complemented nicely by a
narrowly-tapered pin-striped shirt in cool terra cotta,
frankly tucked into pleated clam-diggers, in earthy
shades. Jeff touches off his sharp ensemble with a
Calvin Klein yarmulke.
MARY ELLEN (left) captures the stares of the
college athletes as she proudly struts in a cool,
springy skirt, showing the rich natural ease of finely
striped cotton madras. Her vanilla blouse is spotted
sharply with green and pink flowers, which scream
for attention. A sky-blue Levi's vest puts the spell on
a Delta Mu or her chemistry prof. She walks in
comfort with European-style sneakers, the lower-half
of beautiful designer stockings.
Other style-conscious people prefer those coats
from the leather coat sale at the'State Fairgrounds?
Hundreds of styles to choose from: knee-length coats
for man and women. Winter apparel. Spring
windbreakers. Leather vests with matching socks.
Starting at $19.95. Imagine the stares from your
bowling team when you walk in the alley with
matching suede-leather waist coat and matching
monogrammed bowling bag. Be the first on your
block! Now you can walk the dog, and not be
embarrassed by that pseudo-leather thing you've
been wearing. Get the real thing. Special: Buy one
Daily Copy Editor Nick Katsarelas's mother
buys his clot hes for him.

coat, and your spouse gets the next one free !
One observation before we move on: One has the
idea that all those women who bought those knee-
length, quilt-like winter coatshwouldn't have bought
them had they known every other woman on campus
was buying them.
SEXISM HAS AGAIN become fashionable, and Bo
Derek and Co. have spurred the recent college trend
of rating women numerically. Score cards, in
Olympic black and white, have enjoyed climbing
sales at local sports and book stores. A local bar is
holding "Rating Nights," where women pay 50 cents
to stand on tables and be rated. If rated an average of
at least "7" by the male judges, they get their money
back and also get a free pitcher of beer, compliments
of the bar.
On the artistic front, the 70s saw an orgasmic rush
to capture a glimpse of King Tutankhamen, because
you were nobody unless you saw it. The departure of
the exhibit from the country brought tears and a
touching reflection from a Tut groupie, who followed
the thing around the states.
"You know," he said, pulling at his long hair, "it
was like, really, really, great, you know, and it's like
such a downer now. You know?"
YET, FASHIONABLE ART has seen a new arrival
recently: Gonzo-Punk Surrealism. Just recently, a
young artist from SoHo made his contribution to
Punk Surrealism by hanging by his feet from a
chandelier in the Alice Lloyd cafeteria, slashing his
wrists, and slowly turning to his death. Fashionable?
He thought so. Courageous? Yes. Hygienically
sound? Not really.
A national weekly magazine claims it is now
fashionable for politicians and celebrities to take
vacations in refuge camps, as long as they're
accompanied by photographers.
A recent poll shows that these college groups are
into the following things (in no particular order):
" Fraternities and Sororites: themselves, the
Village Bell, sex...

* Markely: Dooley's, pot, S
Earth, Wind, and Fire, money
" East Quad: Homosex=
Bruce, the Ramones, Bruce
the pseudo-intellectual thing.
" Pre-Meds: Studying, sti
studying ...
" Revolutionary Commu
George Bush, WNIC-AM, M
reruns, God, Milton Friedmar

/,
I,
{
t

;J
All the delightful cushioned
comfort of America s favorite
sandal in an exciting heel
height. Delightfully durable,
too, in naturally cool, genuine
leather. Super look. Super
comfort Unmistakably
BASS'

Prep clothes: Still 'in'
after all these years

r
v :E

By BETH ROSENBERG
EHRU JACKETS, hotpants,
and mini-skirts may have been
shuffled to the back of the
closet, but "preppie" clothes have
remained on the front hanger for years.
Fashioned after the New England
preparatory school attire, many
University students have adopted the
Eastern style of dress, according to
several Ann Arbor clothing merchants.
And if the current trends continue, Ann
Arbor area students will have no
problem competing with their
counterparts at Cambridge.
The well-stocked preppie wardrobe
offers a range of clothes from short-
sleeved alligator shirts and
monogrammed sweaters, to chinos,
straight-legged "cords," crew neck
Daily Night Editor Beth Rosen-
berg spent the balance of her bank
account on clothes while reporting
on this story.

sweaters, bright argyle socks,
Topsiders, "duck" shoes, and penny
loafers.
LSA JUNIOR Sam Morgan, a
salesman at Marty's on State Street,
said he thinks the preppie style is here
to stay. "It's a safe way to dress and it
never goes out of style," he said.
Morgan attributed some of the "prep
look's" popularity to peer pressure.
Bivouac Manager Barbara Wenokur-
Jacobs said the Nickels Arcade shop
sells 12 colors of chinos. Chinos,
designed after men's work pants, have
a straight waistline and baggy legs
which narrow towards the ankle.
Wenokur-Jacobs said students are
buying chinos and LaCoste tennis
shirts. "People are theorizing that
preppie lasts," she said, explaining that
with a recession hitting the country,
shoppers "don't want to buy something
and have to buy (another style) six
months later."
ACCORDING TO Sue Eckrich,
See CAMPUS, Page 6

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Heavenly Fashions Staff
ADRIENNE LYONS
Editor
ARLENE SARAYAN DANIEL WOODS
Sales Managers
Writers: Brad Benjamin, Nick Katsarelas, Buddy Mooorehouse, Beth Rosenberg.
Sales representatives: Patti Barron. Randi Cigelnik, Alissa Goldladen, Sue Gustynski, Iinda Solomon, Nancy Stempel.
Photographers: David Harris. Lisa Klausner. Maureen O'Malle, Peter Serling.

MAST'S CAMPUS STORE
619 E. Liberty 662-0266

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