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March 15, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

age 8-Saturday, March 15,;1980-The Michigan Daily
Gacy goes to death
row; says trial
was only 'round one'

Carter calls for gas tax

CHICAGO (UPI)-Convicted mass
murderer John Wayne Gacy yesterday
was driven under heavy security to
Stateville Correctional Center, where
he will be the "most famous inmate"
among the 22 prisoners on death row.

Gacy, standing emotionless,
Thursday was sentenced to die June 2 in
the electric chair for the sex slayings of
33 boys and young men.
GACY, A 37-year-old building
contractor, convicted sodomist and
part-time clown-later told his lawyers
the decision was just "round one" in a
lengthy appeals process that could last
years.
Illinois Corrections Director Gayle
Franzen said Gacy will join 22 other
prisoners currently on death row at
Stateville, a maximum-security prison
near Joliet, southwest of Chicago.
"He'll be the most famous inmate on
death row," Franzen said. "And he'll
be famous for quite a while."
"He may be rivaled only by Richard
Speck in the entire system." Speck,
among the general population in
Stateville, was convicted of slashing
and choking to death eight nurses in
1966.
A state psychiatrist testified during
Gacy's trial "He always wanted to be
famous ... and now he is famous."
However, Franzen said Gacy's status
as the man convicted of more killings
than any other person in U.S. history
will not give him special privileges.

(Continued from Page 1)
lealders and other guests in the Whitt
House East Room, the president said he
realized his proposals will cause pain to
some people. But, he said, "The cost of
acting is far less than the cost of not
acting.
"The temporary pain of sacrifice and
discipline is far less-for all of us
together-than the still worse
permanent pain of rising inflation,'
Carter said.
"In the fight against inflation, what is
at stake is more than material wealth
or material comfort," he said.
"What is at stake is whether or not we
Americans-as a nation, as a
people-will control our own destiny."
One official, who declined to be
identified, said, "We will see by the end
of the year an abatement of inflationary
forces."
THE INCREASE in gasoline prices
may come as a cruel blow to
Americans, who have watched prices
double in the past year. In addition, an
official said the increase will result in
an 0.4 percentage point -increase in the
Consumer Price Index, which is the
most common measure of inflation.
But Carter said the tax will help
reduce gasoline consumption in this
country, making possible a reduction in
AWARD FOR WATSON
NEW YORK (AP)-Smiling Tom
Watson did not win one of the Big Four
golf tournaments in 1979 but his con-
,sistency in other tour events enabled
him to wrap up his second straight
Seven Crowns of Sports award and a
check for $10,000.
Watson took a hand in 22 tour events
and won five. He was second four times
and third once.

oil imports amounting to 100,000 barrels
a day after a year and up to 250,000
barrels after three years.
Carter's economists had weeks of
discussions with Congress before the
package was announced. And
Democratic leaders promised the
president they will eliminate deficit
spending-for the first time since
1969-in the fiscal year that begins this
October.
The president said a decline in
imports would reduce the likelihood
that oil-exporting nations will raise
prices higher in the future.
MOST OF THE 1981 budget surplus
would come from $10 billion in
revenues from the import fee. But even
discounting this fee, Carter said his 1981
budget would be in exact balance, or
show a surplus of as much as $3 billion.
As part of his budget cutting program
for tight ?ning inflation, Carter ordered
that federal government employment
be trimmed by 20,000 jobs before the
end of the year.
A cut of that size would represent
about 1 per cent of the current full-time
civilian workforce of 1.91 million,
excluding postal workers, putting
employment back to 1979 levels.
The savings was estimated at $57
million.
Later last night, Carter, at a news
conference, accused Iranian
authorities of breaking commitments
on the American hostages. He said he
was bitterly disappointed but hoped
Iran's new parliamentary elections
might soon break the four-month
stalemate.
"We have done everything we could
during the last four months to honor the
principles of our nation and to protect

those hostages," Carter said at a news
conference.
"I don't know when they will be
released," he said.
Carter did not explain what
commitments he was accusing the
authorities in Tehran of not fulfilling.
Presumably, they related to the United
Nations fact-finding panel which
returned this week from Tehran
without seeing the estimated 50
Americans held hostage since last Nov.
4.
The president began his news

conference, the first in four weeks, by
reiterating his proposals to balance the
federal budget as a means of
combatting the nation's high rate
inflation, now running at an annual ra-
of about 18 per cent.
But most of the questioning regarded
foreign affairs, rather than the
economic program..
Carter took full responsibility for the
U.S. vote in the United Nations
criticizing Israel, saying it was "an
honest breakdown in
communications."

Gaev
..no special privileges

Nev. nurse may have
pulled patients 'pl ug.s
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP)-Investiga- OTHER EMPLOYEES of the same
tors said yesterday they were looking special unit allegedly made bets about
into allegations that an "Angel of when a particular patient would die.
Death" nurse switched off life-support Several employees in a "small unit"
systems at Nevada's largest private at the hospital were suspended on
hospital and that other employees Thursday, said David Brandsne
hosptalandtha othr eploeesexecutive director of the medicaT
placed bets on when patients would die, center.
Reports of the macabre betting game
at; Sunrise Hospital, a few blocks from a "It probably makes me about as sick
casino Strip, have prompted dozens of as anything I can think of," said
telephone calls to various law Brandsness, adding that the charges
enforcement agencies from relatives of were "as serious as any that could be
patients who have died at the hospital. made in the health-care profession."
"THERE'S ALL kinds of wild rumors
that are coming in right now-and some RALPH ; DiSIBIO, director of the
that may not be so wild," said Lt. B. J. state Human Resources Department in
Handlon, the assistant chief Carson City, said he had sent two ai4
investigator for the Clark County foarifiohe probebt heoai
district attorney's office. for a briefing on the probe but he said
The Las Vegas Review-Journal, in a his department would not get involved
story yesterday said the probe involved in the investigation.
a nurse who reportedly called herself "I'm more concerned about the
the "Angel of Death" and who allegedly credibility of the medical industry and
switched off life-supporting systems for the public's reaction," he said.
critically ill patients in one ward at the "Apparently this is an isolated incident.
hospital. We understand maybe only one person
She just decided it was time for is actually involved.
certain patients to go," the newspaper\ "There seems to be more to this than
quoted a source as saying. just allegations," he said.
Film festival continues

.

HUNGRY?
THE SOLUTION
IS THIS CLOSE!
Dali663-0511
you ring,
we bring!"

P-- I I

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ANN ARBOR
ANTIQUARIAN BOOK
FAIR AND SALE
MICHIGAN UNION: PENDLETON ROOM
SATURDAY MARCH 15 10AM - 6PM
More than 20 Midwest dealers
Admission free
Ann Arbor Antiquarian
Bookdealers Association

SUBMARINES & PIZZKA

I'

f Continued from Page 5)
technique is always visually seductive,
but 4/7/74 was, in addition, a hauntingly
evocative abstract design, a splendid,
sophisticated light show with wispy,
cloud-like shapes dotting the black
screen in subliminal flashes.
Inside Out was a highly stylized look
at the demons swimming around in a
man's imagination, and the technique
of stark line drawings spotted with oc-
casional bright colors proved
remarkably effective. Also noteworthy
was Labyrinth, a cute, visually char-
ming piece of pop existentialism that
has a sun-glassed Everyman wan-
dering around an ever-
metamorphasizing geometric structure
with his jaded dog, both commenting
heavily on the meaninglessness of life.
This wasn't a sterile downer, though.
Animator Shelley McIntosh proved a
humorous and contented questioner,
CARMINA BURANA
Tonight at 8 p.m. POWR
Tomorrow at 3 p.m CENTER
U-M Symphony Orchestra
Chamber Choir &
Dance Company u6 x

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At Wang, however,
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It's not that we're a small

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The point is, we think
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And vice-versa.

How to workinthe computer
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peppering her movie with lines like,
"He's aware of being aware of
something to be aware of."
SPEAKING OF sunglasses, it seems
that three-fourths of the actors in the,
movies are always wearing the dar
things, as some sort of pointedly blankt
identity-crushing device. This can
really grate on one's nerves, especially
when accompanied by the tedious anti-
melodramatic excesses . of, say,
Richard S. Stanford's Two/Four or
Toney Merritt's Masked Incident, both
of which boasted more pretensions than
their maker's limited creative abilities
could bolster. Where both films failed
was in establishing any sort of convin-
cing, unbroken mood. Instead,@
melange. of styles and camera
techniques were thrown into haphazard
mish-moshes that a bit more planning
(and, perhaps, talent) might have
ironed out.
For some direction, these guys should
take their cue from Pat Olezsko's Ash
Patrol, a surreal, sexy mockup of the
Cinderella saga and the evening's most
sustained and fully realized story-
piece. Olezsko (who's perforn ,
tonight at the 7:00 and 9:00 showsa
hawking her knick-knacks throughout
the week) works with a professional
filmmaker, who gives her movies a
secure cinematic gleam and enables
her to bring her flamboyant concepts
and costumes into full bloom. Ash
Patrol's irresistable tour de force was
Prince Chraming's Ball, a freaked-out,
Dionysiac affair with women flopping
around in huge hyperbolic breasts and
tomato-shaped humanoids that look
like something off of The Banana Spli
What's remarkable about Olezsko's
vision-and I don't think that's too lofty
a term for it-is its sheer exuberant in-
nocence. Ash Patrol has a heady
sexuality, but Andy Warhol's Trash is
the only other movie I can think of that
could transform a striptease (in this
case, Cinderella's) into a divinely
romantic love-dance.
I wish space permitted me to t
some more of the 29 films that played
the Michigan Theater Thursday night.
I'm afraid all I can dosis to urge you'not
to miss the rest.

/:4'
r ti
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'le

TICKETS AT POWER CENTER
tonight 6-8 p.m.
tomorrow 1-3 p.m.
Phone: 763-3333

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3 DAY GALA
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CI.INTCASTlR'S V I ACIF

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