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March 15, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-15

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Buses to aid

By LEE KATTERMAN
A new look in buses took 'its first
public "bow" at Ann Arbor City Hall
yesterday.
The Ann Arbor Transportation,
Authority (AATA) unveiled four new
"Advanced Design Transit Coaches"
with the announcement that the buses
will be in use starting this Monday.
THE NEW BUSES, manufactured by
Grumman Fixible Corporation of Ohio
and costing AATA $106,000 each, were
built to meet controversial state-
mandated accessibility standards for
handicapped riders. The front steps of

three of the four buses can unfold i
hydraulic-lift platforim, provi
riders in wheelchairs access to re
bus lines. These buses can
"kneel"-that is, air from the
suspension can be released, prov
better access by lowering the
another five inches closer to
ground.
A year-old state law requires th
new buses purchased by p
transporation companies be equ
to allow wheelchair-bound passes
access. However, AATA Exec
Director Richard Simonetta said tt

Senators push for cr
Midwest regional pr

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, March 15, 1980-Page 3
handicapped
nto a feature will not be used "for a couple of In other cities that employ such lift-
iding months yet." equipped buses, only a few wheelchair-
gular Simonetta said that the AATA Local bound passengers have been counted.
also Advisory Committee, composed of According to AATA staff, both
front handicapped, senior citizens and Cleveland and Detroit have used
iding others, will be looking at the question of similarly equipped buses and report
steps how the new equipment can best be they service about two passengers in
the used and will make a recommendation wheelchairs per day.
at a later date. Buses equipped with the lift also face
at all "WE ARE STILL committed to Dial- the problem of falling behind schedule
ublic a-Ride (for senior citizens and the because of the extra time required to
ipped handicapped)," said Simonetta. "Our beadsthefheextrairequrdgto
nigers handicapped community has told us load the wheelchair, according to
utive this (lift equipped buses) is not 'the AATA Transportation Manager Henry
ie solution to full accessibility." Bonislawski.
he lift s"Obviously, the bus will need some
recovery time to get back on schedule,"
said Bonislawski, "and to meet our
other rider's needs, we may also have
e a tio n o to put more buses on some lines."
OTHER FEATURES on the new
e , buses include air-conditioning, a
iryspensimfotabdesigndtoraetherid
to decrease the noise level for riders.
moerofotben and morer insuaion
lled, March 4 and Alabama, Florida and Power steering and power brakes
Georgia March 11. makes the new buses "beautiful" to
drive, said AATA bus driver Minnette
os If the bills pass, the first Midwest Harman. Another driver, Patricia
Belt regional primary would occur in 1984. Minott, said all drivers will get an hour
is on Arthurhultz said bills are being of classroom instruction and a half hour
on of _ sponsored by Sen. Stanley Arnoff in of practice before taking the new buses
althy Ohio and Sen. Ron Johnstone in out for service.
nt to Wisconsin. A new route along Stadium
Some observers have argued Boulevard will begin runnin on
Michigan is virtually ignored in the Monday also. Four other routes on the
to be presidential nominating process west side of Ann Arbor will be changing
what because of the late May 20 date of its and service hours are being extended
em," primary. Indiana also has a May from 10p.m. untili11p.m.
primary while Ohio votes in June and Michan Departfunded by a
would Wisconsin in April. Transportation Demonstration Project
grant totaling $500,000 this year.

AT THE MICHIGAN THEATRE
- w:MMARq
R.YAIL
- El

7:00, 9:00 and 11:00 p.m. / Saturday 1:00, 7:00 and 9:00 p.m. All programs
are different and of substantially equal quality. Award winners and highlights
are screened on Sunday at 7:00, 9:00 and 11:00 p.m. Single admission is
$2.00 / Daily Series: $5.00 (not available Sunday). Advance sales begin at
6:00 p.m. for that day only / $20.00 series tickets are on sale the opening
day of the Festival at 5:30. All tickets are sold at the Michigan Theatre .
Liberty near State St.

mm

LANSING (UPI)-Sen. Phil Arthur-
hultz (R-Whitehall) said yesterday he is
jining GOP state senators in two other
*states in pushing legislation which
,Would have the effect of creating a
Midwest regional primary in 1984.
Arthurhultz said he and colleagues in
bhio and Wisconsin are introducing
bills changing their state's primaries to.
coincide with the one in Illinois-the
third Tuesday in March.
A fourth lawmaker in Indiana is
studying similar legislation.
ARTHURHULTZ orchestrated the
move, believing packaging the Midwest
'primaries would give the region
increased clout and force, candidates
and the media to pay more attention to
Its particular problems.
Such a grouping, he said, could offset
the advantage now enjoyed by the early
primary states. Michigan, Indiana,
Ohio and Wisconsin all vote after
Illinois.
Local action is needed because
efforts to create a national system of

regional primaries have sta
Arthurhultz said.
"Such issuesas the availability c
and home heating oil, the loss of
through plant relocation in Sun
states, governmental de-emphas
agricultural research, preservati
the Great Lakes and a he
automobile industry are importa
our area," Arthurhultz said.
"WE WANT THE candidates
aware of those issues and to hear
they have to say about th
Arthurhultz said.
"The regional primary v
significantly increase the impor
of our region in the presid
selection process. It would also r
the somewhat artificial importan
the very first contest," he said.
Arthurhultz said other areas alr
have similar arrangements-M
chusetts and Vermont hold brim

The Ann Arbor Film Coopermfive Presents at MLB: $1.50
Saturday,. March 15
MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY-GRAIL
(Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones, 1975) T7& 10:20-MLB 3
This time the lads of the circus zany their way through landscape that vaguely
resembles medieval England or perhaps, Ypsislanti, Michigan. A side-splitting
visual spoof of chivalry, courtly love, Ingar Bergman, and the Hollywood epic.
Not for lovers of the Tennyson version.
START THE REVOLUTION WITHOUT ME
(Bud Yorkin, 1970) 8:40--ML 33
Gene Wilder's funniest role is in this spoof of swashbucklers. Wilder and
Donald Sutherland play dual roles as two sets of twins mixed up at birth. One
set grows up peasant, the other artistocrat. Their accidental, but simultaneous
presence at the court of Louis XVI years later cause such riotour confusion
that the French Revolution is almost averted! "A mad affectionate tribute to
every historial melodrama anybody ever saw. Wilder and Sutherland perform
magically." L.A. TIMES. With BILLY WHITELAW and ORSON WELLES.
Next Monday: John Ford's ,FORT APACHE and SHE WORE A YELLOW
RIBBON. FREE

tance
ential
educe
ce of
ready
assa-
iaries

Bush urges break with
Iran, immediate embargo

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
Special to the Daily
CHICAGO-Republican Presidential
candidate George Bush yesterda.y
urged the Carter administration to
break off diplomatic relations with Iran
and impose an embargo immediately
"against all products proceeding to and
from Iran." i
In his strongest attack so far on
President Carter's handling of the
confrontation with Iran, Bush said the
Iranian embassy in Washington should
be closed and all Iranian diplomats sent
home immediately.
WHILE BUSH and other Republican
presidential candidates have called for
economic sanctions in the past, Bush's
speech yesterday marked the first call
by one of them for the termination of
formal diplomatic relations with Iran.
"It defies reason that at this late
stage, the administration has yet to take
this step against a regime which defies
all rules of international law and
civilized conduct among nations," Bush
said in a speech before the Chicago
Council on Foreign Relations.
Bush said he would support
communicati-ng with the Khomeini
government through other channels in
order to work toward the release of the
hostages in Tehran. A Bush
spokesperson explained after the
speech that the remark meant Bush

favored negotiating through third-party
foreign diplomats.
ALTHOUGH HE spoke out
forcefully on Iran-an issue once
considered off-limits for presidential
contenders-the former U.N.
ambassador admitted he did not have
all the information available to the
President. But, he added quickly,
Carter's treatment of the situation had
been "a policy of bluff, bluster and
political symbolism."
Bush lashed out against the false
sense of optimism which he said the
White House promoted soon after the
departure of the recent unsuccessful
U.N. commission to Iran.
He said the commission's failure was
another example of Carter's inability to
understand the intentions of Iranian
authorities.
"IN THE END, the White House
strategy of surrendering our own
initiative to the U.N. to free the
hostages proved as meaningless in
terms of the harsh reality of the
situation in Tehran as the President's
symbolic refusal to turn on the national
Christmas tree lights last December,"
Bush said.
Bush asserted at a news conference
after the speech that American troops
would not be needed in order to place an
embargo on goods to and from Iran.

CINEMA II
PRESENTS
CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON
" (JACK ARNOLD, 1954)
A research team on a scientific expedition down a South
American river find themselves in a mysterious tropical
lagoon, the domain of a prehistoric man-monster. Dis-
turbed by their presence, and provoked by the beautiful
woman while pursuing the Beauty he desires. A classic
and lots of fun. Shown in the original 3-DI (79 min.) 7:00
and 10:10.
THE FLY
(KURT NEUMANN, 1958)
A young scientist's attempt to create a Star Trek-like
transporter system turns into terror when his atoms be-
come mixed with a housefly's. Starring-who else-Vin-
cent Price. "At the climax, this balcony sitter nearly shot
through the roof."-New York Times. (95 min.) 8:30 only.
AU D. A $1.50 one show, $2.50 both shows
Tomorrow: OUR DAILY BREAD

I

Now PIaying at Butterfield

Theatres

I no

MMMMMMMOMM

WEDNESDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY"
$1.50 UNTIL 5:30

ADULTS FRI SAT SUN
EVE & HOLIDAYS $3 50
MON THRU THURS
EVENINGS $3.00
MATINEES UNTIL 5 30
EXCEPT HOLIDAYS $2 50
CHILDREN 14 &UNDER $1 50

I

MONDAY NIGHT IS
"GUEST NIGHT"
Two Adults Admitted
for $3.00

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-Noah

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Cam usa
1214 S.Unv st 68 6
on, CuesThurs. Fri at 7:30, 9:15
Wed. Sat, Sun at
1:00. 3:00.15:00. 7:00. 9:15

IT'S COLO
IT'S WET
IT'S HEREI
JR)

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Wayside
3020 v9.naw 434-1782
Mo, Tues ,Thurs Fri 7:30-9:15
Sat .,Sun. Wed
1:303:30-5:30-7:30-9:15

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A curse
from hell!

An American Dream
tines a lov(, tor.
.-

I~

CANNON FILMS RE EASE ® Mon., Tues., Thurs. Fri.
Mon. Tues, Thurs., Fri. 7:00-9:30
E E) 7:15.9:45 Sat., Sun. Wed.
Sat., Sun. Wed. 1:00-4:00-7:009:30
M 1:30-4:30-7:15-9:45
State 12.3-4
231 S. State-662-6264- 662-6264
(UPPER LEVEL) Mon., Tues, Thurs., Fri.
Mon., Tues.,,Thurs., Fri. 7:109:40 7:00-9:30
Sat., Sun., Wed. Sat., Sun., Wed.
1:25-4:25-7:10-9:40 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30
GEORGE SEGAL- NATALIE WOOD NOMINATED FOR
The comedy 2 ACADEMY AWARDS
that fools around a lot! PETER SELLERS

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,

FILMS

ENDS / :e-LAST,
THURS.
MARRIED
Ei UPLE
f~nauR

SHIRLEY MacLAINE
BEING
THERE
United Artists

Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Monty Python and the Holy Grail, 7, 10:20 p.m.;
Start the Revolution Without Me, 8:40 p.m., MLB 3.
Alternative Action-You Can't Take it With You, 7, 9:30 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Guild-18th Ann Arbor 16mm Film Festival, 1, 7, 9 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Cinema Two-Creatures From the Black Lagoon, 7, 10:10 p.m.; The Fly,
8:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Mediatrics-Cousin Cousine, 7, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
SPEAKERS
College of Engineering and Engine Council-Technology Day: various
speakers, exhibits, and tours, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Chrysler Center.
Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living-Handicapped Consumer
Invovement Conference, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Weber's Inn, 3050 Jackson Road.
Teach-In: Peace and Politics in the 1980's-workshops starting .10:30
a.m. and continuing throughout the day, Michigan Union. Bob Chenowith,
Elizabeth McAllister, and Sidney Lens will be speaking at 7:30 p.m. at
Rackham Aud.
PERFORMANCES
PTP Dance Co.-"Carmina Burana," "Seven Deadly Sin," 8 p.m.,
Power Center.'"
School of Music-Piano Recital, Phillis Keyes, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Oasis-Sirani Avedis, singer/songwriter, 7:30, 10 p.m., First Unitarian
Church, 1917 Washtenaw.
!'..-4..L.... T k -9. A fl- ...FC 1...>>A. . U ~ f l

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4j

TONIGHT AT MIDNITE 1
THE AREA'S FAVORITE
CULT CLASSIC
Ruth Gordon
Bud Cort
andmt

TONIGHT AT MIDNITR

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HiHis Hngu DSAre Hilarious!
State I_____
231 S. Statt.- 662-6264 662-5296
TONIGHT AT MIDNITE TONIGHT AT MIDNITE

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