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March 14, 1980 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-14

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 14, 1980-Page 5
BUDGET CUTS MA YALLOWNEWBEATS

Police may add

campus patrols

W By WILLIAM THOMPSON
If the Ann Arbor Police Department
can cut overtime costs and make other
budgetary changes, enough money may
be saved to begin conducting regular
foot patrols around campus next year.
Executive Office Walter Hawkins
said the police department will submit
a budget request to the city
administrator in April that will ask for
more patrol officers. But excessive
ounts of overtime among officers
presently are hindering chances for the
foot patrols' initiation.
Both Mayor Louis Belcher and
Hawkins said more money can be saved
if officers' overtime is reduced.
"We are paying time and half at a
pretty. good clip," he said. "The police
unions have told is that their officers

are working too much overtime."
BUT, SOME CITY officials said they
believe reduced overtime will not solve
the budget problem.
"I am not very optimistic that
overtime can be reduced," said
assistant City Administrator Patrick
Kenney. "Much of the overtime budget
for the city is built in."
Police Chief Walter Krasny agreed
with Kenney. "Certain types of
overtime we're never going to be able
to get rid of," he said.
Krasny, Belcher,' and Hawkins
agreed that time spent testifying in
court was a cause for overtime work
which could not be eliminated. But
Belcher said the courts have already
started scheduling to minimize police
court time and could reduce it still

more.
But Kenney said he doubted that the
patrols would ever be initiated. "I don't
know if there will be an increase in
police officers," he said. But he added,
"The police department feels they
could use more (officers) and they are
probably right."
THE PROPOSED FOOT patrols will
cost the police department $40,000 per
year to pay and equip each additional
officer. In addition to the campus, the
State Street and Main Street areas also
may be regularly patrolled, Hawkins
said. He said the daily hours of the
patrols were uncertain, but noted that
"they will probably not be late at
night."
Belcher also said increasing
efficiency in the department will save
the necessary money. He suggested

Anti-registration events come 15
years after Vietnam teach-in

By GREGG WOLPER
This weekend's anti-draft registration
teach-in takes place nearly 15 years
*fter the country's first teach-in, which
was also held at the University.
Faculty members initiated the first
teach-in on March 24, 1965, to protest
the escalation of the Vietnam War,
More than 3,000 students attended the
event,, which. began at 8 p.m. and
continued until 8 a.m. the next day.
THE TEACH-IN began with speakers
in the early evening, followed by films
and workshops. beginning at midnight.
Most of the events took place in Angell
Mall, and the teach-in concluded with a'
morning rally on the Diag.
"Many students said it was the most
meaningful educational experience
they had at college," recalls Sociology
Prof. William Gamson, one of the main
faculty leaders of the 1965 teach-in.
"There was some pretty intense
discussion going on throughout the
night."
The teach-in led to similar protests at
mpuses across the country and to a
ational teach-in in Washington, D.C.,
less than two months later. "Other
campuses just needed a little push,"
said Gamson. "The movement spread
like wildfire."
Gamson said the present political
situation could be influenced by teach-
Is like the one being offered this
'weekend. "An early, visible
mobilization can have a great effect,"
Teac h-in
{professoirs.
oppose
class boycott
(Continued from Page 1)
attend his discussion either. "I would
prefer (that people come) who have
free time," he said. Stafford added that
he would have been willing to discuss
the issues in the evening when there
would have been no conflict with
classes.
One professor not directly involved
with the teach-in shares the concern
about conflicting with classes.
Cconomics Prof. Ann Anderson said
at while many professors agree about
the value of discussing the issues,
"there are mixed feelings as to whether
it should take place during class time."

he said.
"There was a very different
atmosphere then," Gamson added.
"People today are much quicker to
understand than earlier.," '

The University cooperated in the first
teach-in, according to Gamson, by
making facilities available , and
relaxing the curfew restrictions then in
effect for women.

turning over much clerical work to
cheaper non-police personnel.
But Hawkins said he did not favor
converting to non-police clerical
workers. "Efficiency is already
increasing and hopefully we will save
some bucks," he said.
Krasny warned that the foot patrol's
costs may cause police efficiency to
suffer. "There could be delays in police
officers getting to the scenes of things
that are not real critical," he said.
"People are going to have to wait, but
all over town, one of the big questions
raised is foot beats."
Belcher also noted that a plan which
would reduce the number of officers per
car on patrol from two to one has also
been proposed, but he said he is
undecided on that plan.
Jury
gives Gacy
electric
chair
(Continued from Page 1)
Garippo, however, denied .that
motion and a motion to declare the
state's death penalty wstatute uncon-
stitutional. Amirante then chose to let
. the jury decide whether Gacy should
die for his crimes. His other option was
to have Garippo make the deter-
mination.
"It is our decision at this time that we
would rather go with 12 people as op-
e posed to one person," Amirante said.
GACY, CALLED to the bench by
Garippo, said he understood his senten-
n cing options.
Gacy's date with the electric chair is
. certain to be delayed -, perhaps for
years. State law requires an automatic
appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court.
And the capital punishment law itself -
put into effect less than three years ago
- is being challenged in the courts.
The current Illinois death penalty law
s took effect June 21, 1977. Twelve of
' Gacy's victims are known to have been
killed after that date, making him
eligible for capital punishment as a
multiple murderer.
"I'd be willing to pull the switch. Of
all the families involved, I'll be the first
to volunteer," said Harold Piest, father
l of Robert Piest, 15, the last of Gacy's
f victims.

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TEACH-IN ACTIVITIES
9-10:00 Prof. Allen Whiting: U.S. Foreign Policy. Angell Aud. C
Howard Simon, President, Michigan ACLU: Politics of the Draft
Kuenzel Room (Union)
10-12:00 Free Movies: To be shown continuously through 5:00 (except 12-1)
1-5:00 Hearts and Minds, Intelligence Network, Hiroshina, and others
11-12:00 Prof. J. David Singer: Soviet invasion of Afghanistan as a respons(
to U.S. actions. Angell Aud. C.

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12:00-1:00
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Diag Rally: Speakers will include: Carol King, President, Michigan
NOW; Jim Bristol, jailed WW II CO; State Rep. Perry Bullard.
Profs. Frank Stafford and Peter Steiner: Economics of the Draft
Angell Aud. C.

1:30-2:30 Prof. Dick Mann: Personal Commitment and Political Activism
Union Conf. Rooms 5,6.
2-4:00 NAACP Student reps and Jim Steel, National Chair, Young Worker
Liberation League: Importance of Student Voting and Activism
Angell Room 1035.
2-3:00 State Rep. Perry Bullard and PIRGIM member Marc Manason
Panel Discussion of (S 1722) Proposed Cjiuninal Code Revision
Angell Aud. C..
2:30-5:00 Profs. John Broomfield and Richard Ahern: Current Politica
Situation of Afghanistan Region and an "Illustrated Overview of
a History of.a Fragmented Land." Union Conf. Rooms 5, 6.

No restrictions
Confirmed reservations " free wine with dinner, cognac after e
no restrictions on stays to 1 yr. or advance purchase. Prices valid
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prices subject to change and government approval. Purchase
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Call in NYC, 757-8585; elsewhere, call 800-555-1212 for the
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Profs. Charles Bright and William Rosenberg: U.S.-Soviet Relations.
Angell Aud. C.
ROTC member R.E. Iwirtzt and Tom Finn of Vietnam Veterans
Against the War: Comparison of 1960s to Present Military Situation
and Resistance Activism. Angell Room 1035.

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