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March 11, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-11

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 11, 1980-Page 7
R ECOR D S

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By MARK DIGHTON
Who would ever have thought when
Kevin Godley and Lol Creme left 10
C.C. in 1976 that they would be turning
out albums like Freeze Frame today?
In place of the dependably perfect and,
predictable pop of their former group,
Godley and Creme have fostered a
psychotic pop vision influenced by
Frank Zappa as much as The Rasp-
berries.
Their I0cc influences have not been
forsaken, though. The balanced inter-'
play of bass and tenor voices and the
unforgettable hooks of this'British pop
cornerstone have been transplanted in-
tact to this album. The classic pop
structure of verse-chorus has been ab-
andoned, however, for a song structure
not too different from that of Phillip
Glass-connected themes that seem to
relate only coincidentally. Just witness
"The Sporting Life" from their
previous album, L, an ironic
celebration of suicide and boredom in

modern life, that flows from one
melody to another without any tran-
sition . . . and without really needing
one.
UNFORTUNATELY, there is nothing
of that'epic caliber on Freeze Frame. It
is now quite apparent that Godley and
Crene have also inherited one of the
major faults of 10cc-sterile perfec-
tionism. There is not a rough edge on
this album. The drums sound like they
were recorded in the next room just so
they wouldn't interrupt the cool sub-
telty of the album. What's more likely is
that they were recorded through an
amazing array of filters and sound
processors.
But in any case, the closest thing this
album ever comes to being biting is a
little satirical smugness. The perfor-
mers have entirely forsaken the playful
sense of humor of early 10cc (such as
"Worst Band in the World" off Sheet
Music) for a very adult (but ultimately
boring) artiness. A couple of the songs
on this album are even had, which
doesn't often happen to artists like
these. "Get Well Soon" is a hopelessly
sentimental pop song with gratingly
cute instrumentation. It's probably the
most melancholically beautiful song
they've done since "I'm Not in Love"
without the charming hook and
dramatic development of the latter.
Cold though Godley and Creme's

sound is, it's fascinatin. 'It may be
sterilly perfect, but perfect nonetheless
... and'really clever to boot. I know I
can listen to Steely Dan for hours just
marvelling at their inhumanly flawless,
sound even when I don't like the songs.

to the brain and are just as quickly rip-
ped out by a random change of theme,
often substituting an equally catchy but
transient hook. Being quite the students
of sound, Godley and Creme know how
to play with your musical expectation
like a good Hitchcock film plays with
your dramatic expectations. In "Ran-
dom Brainwave" they develop a soft,
airy verse to a point where you expect it
to slide into an equally melodic and
beautiful chorus. Instead, you find
yourself abruptly dropped into a sharp,
automated chorus which magically
shifts back into the mellow verse
without any real loss of continuity.
Many people might not consider the
processed sound of this band a fault. It
is certainly understandable, given the
fact that the two of them make every
single sound on this album except for a
few guitar solos by Phil Manzanera and
back-up vocals on one song by Paul
McCartney. What else can you expect
from guys who also do music for Ben-
son and Hedges commercials and
produced Neil Sedaka's comeback
album? I must continue to question the
need for this smug sterility-yet I have
to admit that this argument seems
completely irrelevant when lost in the
atmosphere of Freeze Frame.

EVEY
TUESDA o'eG a
after 4:00, p "
FA
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* All~ou atSalad Ba
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free with
; No tipPin9
Dinners also
include
baked potato

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and warm roll
with butter.

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Extra-Cut RIB EYE Extra-Cut
CHOPPED BEEF STEAK RIB EYE STEAK
DINNER DINNER DINNER
2.439 $259 $e1349
Reg. $3.19 Reg. $3.29 Reg. $4.09

Godley and Creme write much more in-
teresting songs. Even alien perfection
can be employed effectively by impec-
cable music technicians like these.
Each sound is perfectly balanced,
especially the maniacally electronic
guitar solo and psychotically cool
vocals of "I Pity Inanimate Objects."
Then there's that totally unique con-
ception of song structure. Perfect slices
of pop melody instantaneously hook in-

I'l

3354 East Washtenaw Ave.
(Across from Arborlond
Shopping Center)
On West Stadium Blvd.
(Just North of Intersection
of Stadium and liberty)

mmolkkL

A 2 16mm Festival opens tonight

u Liberty St. 71-9700
Fomerly filth Foru Theater

14

Cannot be used in combination with other
discounts. At Participating Steakhouses.
VS

'1%

1

HURRY! ENDS THURSDAY!

The 18th Ann Arbor Film Festival
will open tonight and run through Sun-
day, abandoning its traditional location
in the old Architecture & Design
Building for a new setting-the
Michigan Theatre, Ann Arbor's one
remaining souvenir from the days of
cavernous Hollywood movie palaces.
The hectic, crowded atmosphere of
earlier festivals may be missed, but
this year's festival manager, Woody
Sempliner, feels the event will benefit
from the larger screen, different at-
mosphere and increase in seating-1800
seats, offering three times as much
room as the site of the first seventeen
festivals.

THE SIX-NIGHT event has long been
recognized as the central forum of
American experimental film. Director
George Manupelli, a noted figure in
U.S. 16mm film, began the festival in
1962 while teaching ht the U. of M. art
school. The initial fesitval offered 30
films, all of which were screened; this
year, over 300 entries were received,
and a screening committee has deter-
mined which among them to show
during the week at the Michigan. About
25 to 30 hours (out of an average of 150)
of film are selected to be shown to the
public and festival judges.
Audiences at previous festivals have
seen early works by such filmmakers

as George Lucas and Brian DePalma,
Academy award-winning animators
Will Vinton and Frank Mouris, and An-
dy Warhol, who appeared with the
Velvet Underground at one of the first
competitions. Past judges have in-
cluded film critic Pauline Kael. This
year, the judging committee will award
a total of about $6,000 to participating
filmmakers. Following the screening in
Ann Arbor, the Awards Jury reduces
the Festival to nine hours of footage;
this group of about 30 works is then sent
on a tour of other institutions around
the country.
Public screenings will be at 7, 9, and
11 PM nightly from tonight through
Friday and at 1, 7, and 9 PM Saturday.
Festival winners will be shown Sunday
at 7, 9, and 11 PM; single admission for
each show is $2.

GEORGE
BURNS
6:20, 8:0 10:0 e'
Mon Tue.Thur
Wed. 2:30, 4:20,Beat
6:20, 8:10, 10:00 the
Stil 5:30 - Systeml

*Soviet pullout from
Afghanistan unlikely

opp
-

(Continued from Page 1)
U.S. "imperialism" and Chinese,
-hegemonism," the Soviets now seem
to be telling the world to accept their
,actions.
ONLY A fortnight ago, President
Leonid Brezhnev and leading Soviet
publications suggested a Soviet troop
pullout was possible if the United States
and Afghanistan's neighbors' would
"guarantee" to stop meddling in
internal Afghan affairs.
"It appears clear that the Soviet
offensive in Kunar province further
north has now been extended to
Paktia," said one Western military
observer in Islamabad.
In a dispatch from Kabul, Tass said

Pushtu tribal leaders in Afghanistan
have voiced support for the Moscow-
backed goverpment of Babrak Karmal
and citizens have formed voluntary
"groups of resistance" to fight the
rebels.
In another development, an
American businessman who arrived in
New Delhi, India from the Afghan
capital said he saw an American
arrested in Kabul's old bazaar 10 days
ago for taking pictures there.
The businessman, who declined to
give his name, said he was unsure of the
man's name but that4 he was a carpet
dealer from Boston and was arrested
with a group of Pakistanis.

The University of Michigan Branch of the Society of Auto-
E motive Engineers presents a
TUNE-UP CLASS
7:00 PM, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1980
ROOM 325 WEST ENGINEERING
20 people from the tune-up class will be invited to tune their own car at the-
TUNE-UP CLINIC:
9:00 to 4:00 on Saturday, March 15
Diagnostic equipment, tools and guidance supplied
A $6.00 fee will be charged-$7.00 with air conditioning
8 CAFIMINA BURANAwMam
March 13-15 at 8 POWER SEVEN
March16 at 3 CENTER IDEADY
U of Michigan School of Music/DANCE COMPANY
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CHAMBER CHOIR

UniversityCourse 418.
BLACK CHILDREN IN AMERICA:
Current Research and Advocacy Issues
March 18, April 3 - Tues. and Thur. 7:00-9:30 P.M. - 407 Loro Hall (Old A&D Bldg.)
VONNIE C. McLOYD, Ph.D., Coordinator 1 CREDIT HOUR
207 LORCH HALL REGISTRATION: 207 Larch Hall
764-0430 909 Monroe Street
PREREQUISITES: Permission of Instructor
GUEST SPEAKERS: DIANA SLAUGHER. Ph.D., Northwestern University; WILLIAM CROSS. Ph.D.. Cornell
University; A. WADE BOYKINS, Ph.D., Cornell University; ERNEST D. WASHINGTON. Ph.D.. University of
Massachusetts.
Readings for three weeks will be available at Albert's Copy center. Students should ALREADY have
completed the readings for the first week when they come to class on March 18th. For further infar-
mation. contact Vonnie c. McLoyd of 764,0430, Rosellen Cheek at 764.5513, or Checkpoint at 764.6810.
This mini course supported by U M International Year of the Child Committee
The Ann Arbor Film Coopesivse Presents at Nat. Sci.: $1.50
Tuesday, March 11
JOSEPH ANDREWS
(Tony Richardson, 1977) 7:00-NAT. SCI.
Richardson returns to the Tom Jones country of wenches, rogues, and innocents
with yet another brilliant adaptation of Fielding. A young man (PETER FIRTH)
rises on the social scale by rising to the sexual occasion, all the while trying to
remain faithful to one true love. MICHAEL HORDERN, BERYL REID and ANN-
MARGARET as the notorious Lady Boob, "Richardson's triumph. . . all the 'charm
and gusto of Tom Jones."-Arthur Knight. This film, sabotaged byits dis-
tributrs, went in and out of circulation quicker than a cockroch.fter two
years of trying, we've brought it here, do not miss. It may be your only chance.
TOM JONES
(Tony Richardson, 1963) 9:00-NAT. SCI.
Based on a ribald novel by Henry Fielding, this film is a bawdy social satire of
eighteenth century England, Richardson adds hilarity to his usual somber social
commentary in this biting statement. Well acted and beautifully photographed,
the film stars Albert Finney and Susannah York.
Tomorrow: Federico Fellini's LA DOLCE VITA and Claude Chabrol's TEN
DAY'S WONDER at Aud. A.
AT THE MICHIGAN THEATRE
" " """" "A" "A" "
.- .A
LEAVING HOME AT AGE 18

-1.

e0ose

the
DAVE BRUBE-CK
QUARTET

u

I

special guest
peter 'madcat ruth

III

m

[i

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