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March 11, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-11

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HIGHEST SINCE 1971 SA YS DEPAR TMENT CHAIRMAN

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 11; 1980-Page 3

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Political Science enrollment up

By LORENZO BENET
More students are taking University
litical science courses today than at
time since 1971, when campus
political turbulence was just beginning
to die down.
""The reasons for the sudden increase
are hard to decipher," said Samuel
Barnes, chairman of the department.
He said the enrollment increase could
be attributed "to the fact that political
science is a good preparation for law,
business, public policy, and other
graduate and Ph.D. programs."
V ROF. ALLAN WHITING said some
the increase might be because this
year is an election year.
,Barnes also cited a 1979 Chronicle of
Higher Education survey that listed the
University Political Science
Department as the fourth best in the
country. "We like to think the quality of
the program has something to do with
the increase," he added.
In 1979-..80, 5549 graduate and
undergraduate students enrolled in

political science courses. In 1970-71,
6552 students were enrolled in the
department.
"THE DEPARTMENT'S enrollment
has fluctuated over the past several
years," explained Barnes. "But we've
experienced a 9.5 per cent increase
since last year."
Barnes said the undergraduate Fall
enrollment rose 11 per cent since the
same time in 1978, while Winter
enrollment increased 4 per cent since
the same time last year.
Barnes said the enrollment increase
has caused overcrowding in certain
areas, such as classes on China,
constitutional law, and American
politics. But Barnes said enrollment is
generally lower in classes dealing with
foreign politics.
WHITING, WHO teaches Political
Science 361 (World Political Issues),
said his course had waiting list of 60
students, even though the class
accommodates up to 400 students.-'
"One of our China courses. (Political
Science 428) is jammed," he said. "We

figured on an enrollment of 75 for that
course and 90 signed up. Unfortunately
we can't get the room changed because
there are no rooms available that can
hold that number of students."
"Sometimes it is difficult to estimate
how many students will sign up for a
class," said Barnes. "We try to guess
what the final enrollment will be based
on past experience."
HE SAID that if a section expects 30
students to enroll, the department will
attempt to, secure a room to
accommodate 40 students, to allow for
some flexibility. Barnes noted that once
a room is assigned it is very difficult to
change it, especially during peak hours
when the larger rooms are occupied.
"Then department encourages its
professors not tosadmit morestudents
than there are seats because of the
problem with reassigning rooms," he
said.
If the trend in enrollment continues at
the current pace, Barnes said the
department will seek more funds from
LSA: Meanwhile, he said the
department will adjust by gradually
shifting resources from the graduate to
the undergraduate program and by
hiring new professors in areas of
increased interest.
"WE ARE IN the process of hiring
two professors who specialize in
American politics," Barnes said. "We
will also find money in the budget to.
hire more TAs for lower level courses."
Barnes stressed that last fall the
department offered 49 courses, five
fewer than the previous year. He also
said that last winter, the department
listed only 38 undergraduate courses.
"Next year we plan to add more
courses, and will distribute them

evenly between the two terms," Barnes
added.
He emphasized that the department's
quality has not suffered from the
overcrowding. The department, he
says, demands much of its students in
terms of reading and writing
workloads. He also said that next year
it will revise Political Science 361 by
including two discussion sections for
students who wish to receive four
credits, instead of the current two
credits for meeting two hours per week.
"It's also important to mention that
the student body is a vital part of the
department," said Barnes. "Students
sit on the various department
committees, participate in
organizations like the International
Relations Society, and will soon publish
the first Michigan Journal of Political
Science."
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FILMS
C inema Two-Black Peter, 7,9 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild-18th Ann Arbor 16mm Film Festival, 7, 9, 11 p.m.,
Michigan Theatre. Every show different-series tickets available.
Ann Arbor Film Co-operative-Joseph Andrews, 7 p.m., Tom Jones, 9
p.m.; Nat. Sci. Aud.
U-M Flyers-Aerobic Film Festival featuring the Blue Angels and Bob
Hoover, 8 p.m., UGLI Multi-purpose room.
SPEAKERS
Research Policy & Management Program-Marc Ross, "A National View
of Improved Energy Use,". noon, 1028 Dana.
PAC/Guild House-Marty Bombeck, "Sexism: An Unpleasant Reality of
University Life," noon, Guild House, 8702 Monroe.
Center for Chinese Studies-Harry Harding, "The Future of China," noon,
Lane Hall Commons Room. Brown bag lunch.
Ecumenical Campus Center, International Center-Lina Ben-Dor,
"Israeli Settlements and Peacve: A Provocative Viw," noon, International
Center. Luncheon.
Department of Chemistry-Werner Bachmann Memorial Lecture, Koji
Nakanishi, "Recent Studies on Visual Pigments and Bacteriorhodopsin,"
3:30 p.m., 1210 Chem. Bldg.
College of Engineering-Mathematics Colloquium-Stefan Hildebrandt, 4
p.m., 320' Angell.
Computing Center-Forrest Hartman, "Use and Function of the Ontel
Terminal, 4 p.m., MLB Lecture room 2.
Great Lakes & Marine Enviro.-David Armstrong, "PCBs in Lake
Michigan Sedim'ents,"4 p.m., 165 Chrysler Center.
Dept. of Chem.-Dennis Tuck, "Direct Electro-chemical Synthesis of
Inorganic and Organometallic Compounds," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem. Bldg.
Bioenbgineering-Michael Savageau, 'Molecular and Cellular Control in
Biology: Survey of Mechanisms and Questons," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Eng.
PIRGIM-Paul Teich, "Using the Courts for Law Reform," 7 p.m., Conf.
Rm. 4, Union.
College of Engineering-"Current and Future Process Technology for
VLSI (very large scale integration) Chips," Kensall Wise, 7:30-10 p.m.,
Cgrysler Center.
Population Studies Center/Center for Population Planning-Thomas
Burch, "Ylousehold Complexity: International Comparisons of Adult Co-
Residence," 7:30 p.m.; Faculty Lounge, 3rd floor, School of Public Health
Auditorium I.
Department of Psychiatry/School of Social Work/Center for Human
Growth and Development-John Bowlby, "Attachment and Loss," 8 p.m.,
mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League.
Music Theory Faculty Series-John Clough, "Music, and Mathematics,"
8:30 p.m., MLB Lecture Room 1.

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Needed for
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April 8th and 9th
Dedicated non-partisan persons who are searching
for rewarding experiences (with financial compen-
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MSA-3909 MICHIGAN UNION
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS:
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At Wang, however,
you'll get a chance to be a
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It's not that we're a small

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The point is, we think
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We also believe in

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If you'd like to work in
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MEETINGS

How towork in the computer
industry without becoming
a stallstic.

Graduate Women's Newowrk-5:00, Guild House, 802 Monroe.
PIRGIM-Energy Task Force, 7 p.m., Welker Room, Union.
PIRGIM-Anti-Draft Task Force, 7 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
Reagan for President-7:30 p.m., Conference Room 5, Union.
Rackham Student Government-7:30 p.m., Executive Board Room,
Rackham.
National Organization for Women-7:30, Unitarian Church, 1917
Washtenaw.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Harp Recital, Mark Brewer; 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Residential Colleghe-Lauran ce Yep, readings of children's literature,
science fiction, etc., 8-p.m., Benzinger Library, East Quad.

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]EXHIBITS

4

Kelsey Museum of Archaeology-9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Museum of Art-"Ceramics from U-M Collections," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Clements Library-"Childhood in Early America," 9 a.m.-noon; 1-5 p.m.
Slusser Gallery-"Pieces of Eight," "Potter's Dozen, Sculptural ceramics
and pottery,"9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Center-Paintings by John Guthrie, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Union Art Gallery-"Group exhibition of graduates from the U-M MFA
0program in ceramics," 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Rare Book Room-' French Illustrated Books of the Eighteenth Century,"
10 a.m.-noon, 1-5 p.m.
Matthaei Botanical Gardens-"Friendship through Flowers," Japanese
Flower Arrangements, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Stearns Collection-Musical Instruments, 1-4:30 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS

7

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WANG
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Making the worldmnore przductive.

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