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January 13, 1980 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-13

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Page 12-Sunday, January 13, 1980-The Michigan Daily

j

CHANCES SLIM FOR 'MEET THE PRESS' DEBA TE

Campaign rolls*
(Continued from Page 1T ce may have been overlooked.
announcement of the encounter at the But with the debate killed by Carter's
United Auto Workers hall. withdrawal, the candidates looking for
PARTYLEADERS were curious to exposure and the news medi4 hoping
see the three candidates together after for a break in campaign routine, the
days of sharp debate over Carter's im- $10-a-person dinner assumed a new
position of a partial grain embargo to dimension.
punish the Soviet Union for invading THE DINNER took place against a
Afghanistan. backdrop of Kennedy-Carter campaign
The dinner climaxed a week in which infighting that has split the Democratic
Kennedy took his campaign for the par- Party in Iowa.
ty's 1980 presidential nomination down As an example, the politically active
to the farm to exploit fears that the em- UAW, which has a large membership in
bargo would depress grain prices. Waterloo, played a key role in Carter's
The. president sent his wife, 1976 campaign but has shifted loyalties
Rosalynn, Agriculture Secretary Bob to Kennedy.
Bergland and Mondale out in an attem- Waterloo also has been the site of bit-
pt to persuade Iowans that the embargo ter disputes between Carter and Ken-
was the most effective way to respond 'nedy, factions within the largest black
to Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. community in Iowa.
ORIGINALLY intended as an in- THE CROSS-CUTTING loyalties here
nocuous fund-raising dinner, the three- are incredible," said one local party
way appearance mushroomed into one leader. "I'm still surprised anyone
of the major stops on the road to Iowa's agreed to show up."
Jan. 21 caucuses. Kennedy wound up six days of exten-
Had a Carter-Kennedy-Brown debate sive speechmaking with stops in five
set for last Monday in Ds Moines come Iowa cities - Cedar Rapids, Mason
off as scheduled, last night's appearan- City, Sioux City, Des Moines and

without Carter

Bert Lance to face
fraud trial tomorrow

Waterloo.
In each place,he implored his
audience yesterday to attend the
caucuses because, "Where you stand in
that caucus may very well make a dif-
ference about the future of this coun-
try."
IN ADEL, IOWA, Rosalynn Carter
appealed to Iowans to support the
Soviet grain embargo, saying "A united
America is the most powerful force in
the world."

A Des Moines Register poll this week
of Iowa Democrats showed Carter
leading Kennedy 57 to 25 per cent with
only four per cent for Brownand the
rest undecided.
Last month, the newspaper's poll
showed 40 per cent for Carter, 40 per
cent for Kennedy and eight per cent for
Brown. In August, Kennedy led Carter
by 49 per cent to 26 per cent. Brown was
not included.

Women eye private buses

(Continued from Page 1)'
be operated entirely by women, and
trying to expand it would require much
time without certainty that the project
would ever be approved, Januszewski
said. In addition, she said, it would
mean dependence on AATA.
"With the women's transit system we
would be in more control of our,
process," she added.
ONE AREA LEFT to be examined is
the route the transit system would
cover. "I think ideally we want it to be
for both University and non-University
women," said Januszewski. But she

added that a shortage of either funds or
volunteers to run the operation and
drive the vehicles could severely limit
the area covered.
Rice agreed on the goals of the
project, but was pessimistic about the
possibility of city-wide coverage.
"We'd love to have it serve the whole
community-but I don't think we have
the resources at this time," she said.
Although Januszewski acknowledged
she isn't sure how long the planning and
organization will take, she said she
hopes a women's transit system can be
in operation "at least by fall."

ATLANTA (AP)-Bert Lance, the
confidant of President Carter and a
man once called the "deputy
president," goes on trial tomorrow on
bank fraud charges.
Lance, 48, and three
associates-Richard Carr, Thomas
Mitchell and Jack Mullins-will be
tried in federal court on charges of
fraud and conspiracy in their business
dealings between 1970 and 1978.
Lance, a banker who was federal
budget director for eight months in
1977, is charged in 22 of 33 counts in a
bank fraud and conspiracy indictment.
He could face a maximum sentence of
95 years plus $115,000 in fines if convic-
ted on all charges.
WHILE IN Washington, Lance had so
much influence on President Carter
that he was sometimes called the
"deputy president." Lance, a towering
6 feet 5, often played tennis with Carter.
The two had lunch together twice a
week and talked on the telephone daily.
Lance and his co-defendants have
pleaded innocent to all charges. But
controversy over Lance's banking
practices forced his resignation on
Sept. 21, 1977. When Carter announced
his friend's departure, he was near
tears.
"I don't think there is any way that I
could find anyone to replace Bert Lance
that would be, in my judgment, as com-
petent, as strong, as decent and as close
to me as a friend and adviser," Carter
said.
LANCE, THE SON of the president of
a small Methodist college, dropped out
of the University of Georgia when he
was 20 to support his wife, LaBelle, and
their newborn child, the first of four
sons. He officiated at high school foot-
ball games to supplement his $90-a-
month job in the Calhoun First National
Bank, founded by his wife's grand-

SOFTBALL
An Organizational Meeting for all
new women who are interested in.
playing intercollegiate softball.
DATE: Wednesday, Jan. 16th
TIME: 4:00 pm
PLACE: Athletic Adm. Bldg.'
1000 S. State St.,
Basement Classroom

Lane
... 95-year maximum sentence
father.
By 1963, when he was 32, Lance and
some associates had purchased contr(
of the bank. Lance was named
president. He increased the bank's
assets sevenfold in seven years.
Lance met Carter, then a state
senator, in 1966. He rounded up
business support for Carter's unsuc-
cessful campaign for governor later
that year. Carter ran again in 1970, with
Lance's help, and won. Lance became
head of the state highway department.
WHEN CARTER left the governor'
office in 1974, prohibited from seeking b
second term, he supported Lance as a
successor. But Lance finished third in
the Democratic primary.
The alleged financing of his guber-
natorial campaign through overdrafts
and unsecured loans is prominent
among the charges against Lance and
his three co-defendants, all of whom
were involved in the campaign.

SPAGHETTI SPECIAL
LOME ______
GETIT!! All the Pasta
you can eat for
only $2.50
MONDAY
Burrito Special
a5 p..- l2 .m..
*"ly $1."s5

Cobo Arena doors smashed
in rush for concert tickets

DETROIT (UPI) - Six glass doors
were shattered and a seventh ripped off
its hinges early yesterday when about
2,000 young people stormed the Cobo
Arena box office.
Police said many of the youths had
been waiting outside all night, enduring
temperatures in the low teens, to buy
tickets for the February concert of'the
popular Canadian rock group "Rush."

THE CROWD pushed through the
doors after rumors circulated that
there weren't enough tickets for
everyone in line, police said.
No one was injured. One person, a 21-
year-old man, was arrested and
charged with disorderly conduct.
Fifty police officers were sent to the
riverfront arena to restore order. .

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